What Is SHA-256 And How Is It Related to Bitcoin ...

Litecoin Cash

Litecoin Cash (LCC) is a fork of Litecoin itself utilizing an SHA-256 hashing algorithm. While the initial goal was to focus on bringing back SHA-256, along the way we created "Hive Mining," an agent-based system allowing everyday users to participate in securing and hashing the network to earn real LCC rewards. Be sure to visit our website @ https://litecoinca.sh for more information and join us on DISCORD to speak with the team and get free LCC rains just for chatting and being active!
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Myriad - A coin for everyone.

Myriad (XMY) is a Multi-PoW consensus protocol secured by 5 mining algorithms. Each one suits different hardware.
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I created a SHA256 passphrase based address and it was guessed...any way to recover it? /r/Bitcoin

I created a SHA256 passphrase based address and it was guessed...any way to recover it? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] I created a SHA256 passphrase based address and it was guessed...any way to recover it?

The following post by AitorMorales is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7oqhja
The original post's content was as follows:
Last year I asked my girlfriend for a sentence that I would convert into her bitcoins.
She decided upon "Where did you meet your partner?" and with that I created the SHA256 based address 13Kai47pZM7UyYUjkpvnvXphkqoyNtLVXC13Kai47pZM7UyYUjkpvnvXphkqoyNtLVXC.
Then, after saving for several months, I purchased little by little into one bitcoin in Kraken and sent it there in September last year.
Yesterday I checked it out and found it was moved (stolen?) to another address: 133oMuF4cEiJhr1EsnEGKMvMHV2AKqGz2H
Actually, it was moved just one month after i purchased it.
If you reader is the one who moved this, I would like to appeal to your sense of honesty, please, I worked very hard to save that money. Would you send it back to me?
For the rest of you: Do you have any idea of what could I do?
Thank you all.
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bob The Magic Custodian



Summary: Everyone knows that when you give your assets to someone else, they always keep them safe. If this is true for individuals, it is certainly true for businesses.
Custodians always tell the truth and manage funds properly. They won't have any interest in taking the assets as an exchange operator would. Auditors tell the truth and can't be misled. That's because organizations that are regulated are incapable of lying and don't make mistakes.

First, some background. Here is a summary of how custodians make us more secure:

Previously, we might give Alice our crypto assets to hold. There were risks:

But "no worries", Alice has a custodian named Bob. Bob is dressed in a nice suit. He knows some politicians. And he drives a Porsche. "So you have nothing to worry about!". And look at all the benefits we get:
See - all problems are solved! All we have to worry about now is:
It's pretty simple. Before we had to trust Alice. Now we only have to trust Alice, Bob, and all the ways in which they communicate. Just think of how much more secure we are!

"On top of that", Bob assures us, "we're using a special wallet structure". Bob shows Alice a diagram. "We've broken the balance up and store it in lots of smaller wallets. That way", he assures her, "a thief can't take it all at once". And he points to a historic case where a large sum was taken "because it was stored in a single wallet... how stupid".
"Very early on, we used to have all the crypto in one wallet", he said, "and then one Christmas a hacker came and took it all. We call him the Grinch. Now we individually wrap each crypto and stick it under a binary search tree. The Grinch has never been back since."

"As well", Bob continues, "even if someone were to get in, we've got insurance. It covers all thefts and even coercion, collusion, and misplaced keys - only subject to the policy terms and conditions." And with that, he pulls out a phone-book sized contract and slams it on the desk with a thud. "Yep", he continues, "we're paying top dollar for one of the best policies in the country!"
"Can I read it?' Alice asks. "Sure," Bob says, "just as soon as our legal team is done with it. They're almost through the first chapter." He pauses, then continues. "And can you believe that sales guy Mike? He has the same year Porsche as me. I mean, what are the odds?"

"Do you use multi-sig?", Alice asks. "Absolutely!" Bob replies. "All our engineers are fully trained in multi-sig. Whenever we want to set up a new wallet, we generate 2 separate keys in an air-gapped process and store them in this proprietary system here. Look, it even requires the biometric signature from one of our team members to initiate any withdrawal." He demonstrates by pressing his thumb into the display. "We use a third-party cloud validation API to match the thumbprint and authorize each withdrawal. The keys are also backed up daily to an off-site third-party."
"Wow that's really impressive," Alice says, "but what if we need access for a withdrawal outside of office hours?" "Well that's no issue", Bob says, "just send us an email, call, or text message and we always have someone on staff to help out. Just another part of our strong commitment to all our customers!"

"What about Proof of Reserve?", Alice asks. "Of course", Bob replies, "though rather than publish any blockchain addresses or signed transaction, for privacy we just do a SHA256 refactoring of the inverse hash modulus for each UTXO nonce and combine the smart contract coefficient consensus in our hyperledger lightning node. But it's really simple to use." He pushes a button and a large green checkmark appears on a screen. "See - the algorithm ran through and reserves are proven."
"Wow", Alice says, "you really know your stuff! And that is easy to use! What about fiat balances?" "Yeah, we have an auditor too", Bob replies, "Been using him for a long time so we have quite a strong relationship going! We have special books we give him every year and he's very efficient! Checks the fiat, crypto, and everything all at once!"

"We used to have a nice offline multi-sig setup we've been using without issue for the past 5 years, but I think we'll move all our funds over to your facility," Alice says. "Awesome", Bob replies, "Thanks so much! This is perfect timing too - my Porsche got a dent on it this morning. We have the paperwork right over here." "Great!", Alice replies.
And with that, Alice gets out her pen and Bob gets the contract. "Don't worry", he says, "you can take your crypto-assets back anytime you like - just subject to our cancellation policy. Our annual management fees are also super low and we don't adjust them often".

How many holes have to exist for your funds to get stolen?
Just one.

Why are we taking a powerful offline multi-sig setup, widely used globally in hundreds of different/lacking regulatory environments with 0 breaches to date, and circumventing it by a demonstrably weak third party layer? And paying a great expense to do so?
If you go through the list of breaches in the past 2 years to highly credible organizations, you go through the list of major corporate frauds (only the ones we know about), you go through the list of all the times platforms have lost funds, you go through the list of times and ways that people have lost their crypto from identity theft, hot wallet exploits, extortion, etc... and then you go through this custodian with a fine-tooth comb and truly believe they have value to add far beyond what you could, sticking your funds in a wallet (or set of wallets) they control exclusively is the absolute worst possible way to take advantage of that security.

The best way to add security for crypto-assets is to make a stronger multi-sig. With one custodian, what you are doing is giving them your cryptocurrency and hoping they're honest, competent, and flawlessly secure. It's no different than storing it on a really secure exchange. Maybe the insurance will cover you. Didn't work for Bitpay in 2015. Didn't work for Yapizon in 2017. Insurance has never paid a claim in the entire history of cryptocurrency. But maybe you'll get lucky. Maybe your exact scenario will buck the trend and be what they're willing to cover. After the large deductible and hopefully without a long and expensive court battle.

And you want to advertise this increase in risk, the lapse of judgement, an accident waiting to happen, as though it's some kind of benefit to customers ("Free institutional-grade storage for your digital assets.")? And then some people are writing to the OSC that custodians should be mandatory for all funds on every exchange platform? That this somehow will make Canadians as a whole more secure or better protected compared with standard air-gapped multi-sig? On what planet?

Most of the problems in Canada stemmed from one thing - a lack of transparency. If Canadians had known what a joke Quadriga was - it wouldn't have grown to lose $400m from hard-working Canadians from coast to coast to coast. And Gerald Cotten would be in jail, not wherever he is now (at best, rotting peacefully). EZ-BTC and mister Dave Smilie would have been a tiny little scam to his friends, not a multi-million dollar fraud. Einstein would have got their act together or been shut down BEFORE losing millions and millions more in people's funds generously donated to criminals. MapleChange wouldn't have even been a thing. And maybe we'd know a little more about CoinTradeNewNote - like how much was lost in there. Almost all of the major losses with cryptocurrency exchanges involve deception with unbacked funds.
So it's great to see transparency reports from BitBuy and ShakePay where someone independently verified the backing. The only thing we don't have is:
It's not complicated to validate cryptocurrency assets. They need to exist, they need to be spendable, and they need to cover the total balances. There are plenty of credible people and firms across the country that have the capacity to reasonably perform this validation. Having more frequent checks by different, independent, parties who publish transparent reports is far more valuable than an annual check by a single "more credible/official" party who does the exact same basic checks and may or may not publish anything. Here's an example set of requirements that could be mandated:
There are ways to structure audits such that neither crypto assets nor customer information are ever put at risk, and both can still be properly validated and publicly verifiable. There are also ways to structure audits such that they are completely reasonable for small platforms and don't inhibit innovation in any way. By making the process as reasonable as possible, we can completely eliminate any reason/excuse that an honest platform would have for not being audited. That is arguable far more important than any incremental improvement we might get from mandating "the best of the best" accountants. Right now we have nothing mandated and tons of Canadians using offshore exchanges with no oversight whatsoever.

Transparency does not prove crypto assets are safe. CoinTradeNewNote, Flexcoin ($600k), and Canadian Bitcoins ($100k) are examples where crypto-assets were breached from platforms in Canada. All of them were online wallets and used no multi-sig as far as any records show. This is consistent with what we see globally - air-gapped multi-sig wallets have an impeccable record, while other schemes tend to suffer breach after breach. We don't actually know how much CoinTrader lost because there was no visibility. Rather than publishing details of what happened, the co-founder of CoinTrader silently moved on to found another platform - the "most trusted way to buy and sell crypto" - a site that has no information whatsoever (that I could find) on the storage practices and a FAQ advising that “[t]rading cryptocurrency is completely safe” and that having your own wallet is “entirely up to you! You can certainly keep cryptocurrency, or fiat, or both, on the app.” Doesn't sound like much was learned here, which is really sad to see.
It's not that complicated or unreasonable to set up a proper hardware wallet. Multi-sig can be learned in a single course. Something the equivalent complexity of a driver's license test could prevent all the cold storage exploits we've seen to date - even globally. Platform operators have a key advantage in detecting and preventing fraud - they know their customers far better than any custodian ever would. The best job that custodians can do is to find high integrity individuals and train them to form even better wallet signatories. Rather than mandating that all platforms expose themselves to arbitrary third party risks, regulations should center around ensuring that all signatories are background-checked, properly trained, and using proper procedures. We also need to make sure that signatories are empowered with rights and responsibilities to reject and report fraud. They need to know that they can safely challenge and delay a transaction - even if it turns out they made a mistake. We need to have an environment where mistakes are brought to the surface and dealt with. Not one where firms and people feel the need to hide what happened. In addition to a knowledge-based test, an auditor can privately interview each signatory to make sure they're not in coercive situations, and we should make sure they can freely and anonymously report any issues without threat of retaliation.
A proper multi-sig has each signature held by a separate person and is governed by policies and mutual decisions instead of a hierarchy. It includes at least one redundant signature. For best results, 3of4, 3of5, 3of6, 4of5, 4of6, 4of7, 5of6, or 5of7.

History has demonstrated over and over again the risk of hot wallets even to highly credible organizations. Nonetheless, many platforms have hot wallets for convenience. While such losses are generally compensated by platforms without issue (for example Poloniex, Bitstamp, Bitfinex, Gatecoin, Coincheck, Bithumb, Zaif, CoinBene, Binance, Bitrue, Bitpoint, Upbit, VinDAX, and now KuCoin), the public tends to focus more on cases that didn't end well. Regardless of what systems are employed, there is always some level of risk. For that reason, most members of the public would prefer to see third party insurance.
Rather than trying to convince third party profit-seekers to provide comprehensive insurance and then relying on an expensive and slow legal system to enforce against whatever legal loopholes they manage to find each and every time something goes wrong, insurance could be run through multiple exchange operators and regulators, with the shared interest of having a reputable industry, keeping costs down, and taking care of Canadians. For example, a 4 of 7 multi-sig insurance fund held between 5 independent exchange operators and 2 regulatory bodies. All Canadian exchanges could pay premiums at a set rate based on their needed coverage, with a higher price paid for hot wallet coverage (anything not an air-gapped multi-sig cold wallet). Such a model would be much cheaper to manage, offer better coverage, and be much more reliable to payout when needed. The kind of coverage you could have under this model is unheard of. You could even create something like the CDIC to protect Canadians who get their trading accounts hacked if they can sufficiently prove the loss is legitimate. In cases of fraud, gross negligence, or insolvency, the fund can be used to pay affected users directly (utilizing the last transparent balance report in the worst case), something which private insurance would never touch. While it's recommended to have official policies for coverage, a model where members vote would fully cover edge cases. (Could be similar to the Supreme Court where justices vote based on case law.)
Such a model could fully protect all Canadians across all platforms. You can have a fiat coverage governed by legal agreements, and crypto-asset coverage governed by both multi-sig and legal agreements. It could be practical, affordable, and inclusive.

Now, we are at a crossroads. We can happily give up our freedom, our innovation, and our money. We can pay hefty expenses to auditors, lawyers, and regulators year after year (and make no mistake - this cost will grow to many millions or even billions as the industry grows - and it will be borne by all Canadians on every platform because platforms are not going to eat up these costs at a loss). We can make it nearly impossible for any new platform to enter the marketplace, forcing Canadians to use the same stagnant platforms year after year. We can centralize and consolidate the entire industry into 2 or 3 big players and have everyone else fail (possibly to heavy losses of users of those platforms). And when a flawed security model doesn't work and gets breached, we can make it even more complicated with even more people in suits making big money doing the job that blockchain was supposed to do in the first place. We can build a system which is so intertwined and dependent on big government, traditional finance, and central bankers that it's future depends entirely on that of the fiat system, of fractional banking, and of government bail-outs. If we choose this path, as history has shown us over and over again, we can not go back, save for revolution. Our children and grandchildren will still be paying the consequences of what we decided today.
Or, we can find solutions that work. We can maintain an open and innovative environment while making the adjustments we need to make to fully protect Canadian investors and cryptocurrency users, giving easy and affordable access to cryptocurrency for all Canadians on the platform of their choice, and creating an environment in which entrepreneurs and problem solvers can bring those solutions forward easily. None of the above precludes innovation in any way, or adds any unreasonable cost - and these three policies would demonstrably eliminate or resolve all 109 historic cases as studied here - that's every single case researched so far going back to 2011. It includes every loss that was studied so far not just in Canada but globally as well.
Unfortunately, finding answers is the least challenging part. Far more challenging is to get platform operators and regulators to agree on anything. My last post got no response whatsoever, and while the OSC has told me they're happy for industry feedback, I believe my opinion alone is fairly meaningless. This takes the whole community working together to solve. So please let me know your thoughts. Please take the time to upvote and share this with people. Please - let's get this solved and not leave it up to other people to do.

Facts/background/sources (skip if you like):



Thoughts?
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

Syscoin Platform’s Great Reddit Scaling Bake-off Proposal

Syscoin Platform’s Great Reddit Scaling Bake-off Proposal

https://preview.redd.it/rqt2dldyg8e51.jpg?width=1044&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=777ae9d4fbbb54c3540682b72700fc4ba3de0a44
We are excited to participate and present Syscoin Platform's ideal characteristics and capabilities towards a well-rounded Reddit Community Points solution!
Our scaling solution for Reddit Community Points involves 2-way peg interoperability with Ethereum. This will provide a scalable token layer built specifically for speed and high volumes of simple value transfers at a very low cost, while providing sovereign ownership and onchain finality.
Token transfers scale by taking advantage of a globally sorting mempool that provides for probabilistically secure assumptions of “as good as settled”. The opportunity here for token receivers is to have an app-layer interactivity on the speed/security tradeoff (99.9999% assurance within 10 seconds). We call this Z-DAG, and it achieves high-throughput across a mesh network topology presently composed of about 2,000 geographically dispersed full-nodes. Similar to Bitcoin, however, these nodes are incentivized to run full-nodes for the benefit of network security, through a bonded validator scheme. These nodes do not participate in the consensus of transactions or block validation any differently than other nodes and therefore do not degrade the security model of Bitcoin’s validate first then trust, across every node. Each token transfer settles on-chain. The protocol follows Bitcoin core policies so it has adequate code coverage and protocol hardening to be qualified as production quality software. It shares a significant portion of Bitcoin’s own hashpower through merged-mining.
This platform as a whole can serve token microtransactions, larger settlements, and store-of-value in an ideal fashion, providing probabilistic scalability whilst remaining decentralized according to Bitcoin design. It is accessible to ERC-20 via a permissionless and trust-minimized bridge that works in both directions. The bridge and token platform are currently available on the Syscoin mainnet. This has been gaining recent attention for use by loyalty point programs and stablecoins such as Binance USD.

Solutions

Syscoin Foundation identified a few paths for Reddit to leverage this infrastructure, each with trade-offs. The first provides the most cost-savings and scaling benefits at some sacrifice of token autonomy. The second offers more preservation of autonomy with a more narrow scope of cost savings than the first option, but savings even so. The third introduces more complexity than the previous two yet provides the most overall benefits. We consider the third as most viable as it enables Reddit to benefit even while retaining existing smart contract functionality. We will focus on the third option, and include the first two for good measure.
  1. Distribution, burns and user-to-user transfers of Reddit Points are entirely carried out on the Syscoin network. This full-on approach to utilizing the Syscoin network provides the most scalability and transaction cost benefits of these scenarios. The tradeoff here is distribution and subscription handling likely migrating away from smart contracts into the application layer.
  2. The Reddit Community Points ecosystem can continue to use existing smart contracts as they are used today on the Ethereum mainchain. Users migrate a portion of their tokens to Syscoin, the scaling network, to gain much lower fees, scalability, and a proven base layer, without sacrificing sovereign ownership. They would use Syscoin for user-to-user transfers. Tips redeemable in ten seconds or less, a high-throughput relay network, and onchain settlement at a block target of 60 seconds.
  3. Integration between Matic Network and Syscoin Platform - similar to Syscoin’s current integration with Ethereum - will provide Reddit Community Points with EVM scalability (including the Memberships ERC777 operator) on the Matic side, and performant simple value transfers, robust decentralized security, and sovereign store-of-value on the Syscoin side. It’s “the best of both worlds”. The trade-off is more complex interoperability.

Syscoin + Matic Integration

Matic and Blockchain Foundry Inc, the public company formed by the founders of Syscoin, recently entered a partnership for joint research and business development initiatives. This is ideal for all parties as Matic Network and Syscoin Platform provide complementary utility. Syscoin offers characteristics for sovereign ownership and security based on Bitcoin’s time-tested model, and shares a significant portion of Bitcoin’s own hashpower. Syscoin’s focus is on secure and scalable simple value transfers, trust-minimized interoperability, and opt-in regulatory compliance for tokenized assets rather than scalability for smart contract execution. On the other hand, Matic Network can provide scalable EVM for smart contract execution. Reddit Community Points can benefit from both.
Syscoin + Matic integration is actively being explored by both teams, as it is helpful to Reddit, Ethereum, and the industry as a whole.

Proving Performance & Cost Savings

Our POC focuses on 100,000 on-chain settlements of token transfers on the Syscoin Core blockchain. Transfers and burns perform equally with Syscoin. For POCs related to smart contracts (subscriptions, etc), refer to the Matic Network proposal.
On-chain settlement of 100k transactions was accomplished within roughly twelve minutes, well-exceeding Reddit’s expectation of five days. This was performed using six full-nodes operating on compute-optimized AWS c4.2xlarge instances which were geographically distributed (Virginia, London, Sao Paulo Brazil, Oregon, Singapore, Germany). A higher quantity of settlements could be reached within the same time-frame with more broadcasting nodes involved, or using hosts with more resources for faster execution of the process.
Addresses used: 100,014
The demonstration was executed using this tool. The results can be seen in the following blocks:
612722: https://sys1.bcfn.ca/block/6d47796d043bb4c508d29123e6ae81b051f5e0aaef849f253c8f3a6942a022ce
612723: https://sys1.bcfn.ca/block/8e2077f743461b90f80b4bef502f564933a8e04de97972901f3d65cfadcf1faf
612724: https://sys1.bcfn.ca/block/205436d25b1b499fce44c29567c5c807beaca915b83cc9f3c35b0d76dbb11f6e
612725: https://sys1.bcfn.ca/block/776d1b1a0f90f655a6bbdf559ff5072459cbdc5682d7615ff4b78c00babdc237
612726: https://sys1.bcfn.ca/block/de4df0994253742a1ac8ac9eec8d2a8c8b0a6d72c53d6f3caa29bb6c171b0a6b
612727: https://sys1.bcfn.ca/block/e5e167c52a9decb313fbaadf49a5e34cb490f8084f642a850385476d4ef10d70
612728: https://sys1.bcfn.ca/block/ab64d989edc71890e7b5b8491c20e9a27520dc45a5f7c776d3dae79057f59fe7
612729: https://sys1.bcfn.ca/block/5e8b7ecd0e36f99d07e4ea6e135fc952bf7ec30164ab6f4d1e98b0f2d405df6d
612730: https://sys1.bcfn.ca/block/d395df3d31dde60bbb0bece6bd5b358297da878f0beb96be389e5f0e043580a3
It is important to note that this POC is not focused on Z-DAG. The performance of Z-DAG has been benchmarked within realistic network conditions: Whiteblock’s audit is publicly available. Network latency tests showed an average TPS around 15k with burst capacity up to 61k. Zero-latency control group exhibited ~150k TPS. Mainnet testing of the Z-DAG network is achievable and will require further coordination and additional resources.
Even further optimizations are expected in the upcoming Syscoin Core release which will implement a UTXO model for our token layer bringing further efficiency as well as open the door to additional scaling technology currently under research by our team and academic partners. At present our token layer is account-based, similar to Ethereum. Opt-in compliance structures will also be introduced soon which will offer some positive performance characteristics as well. It makes the most sense to implement these optimizations before performing another benchmark for Z-DAG, especially on the mainnet considering the resources required to stress-test this network.

Cost Savings

Total cost for these 100k transactions: $0.63 USD
See the live fee comparison for savings estimation between transactions on Ethereum and Syscoin. Below is a snapshot at time of writing:
ETH price: $318.55 ETH gas price: 55.00 Gwei ($0.37)
Syscoin price: $0.11
Snapshot of live fee comparison chart
Z-DAG provides a more efficient fee-market. A typical Z-DAG transaction costs 0.0000582 SYS. Tokens can be safely redeemed/re-spent within seconds or allowed to settle on-chain beforehand. The costs should remain about this low for microtransactions.
Syscoin will achieve further reduction of fees and even greater scalability with offchain payment channels for assets, with Z-DAG as a resilience fallback. New payment channel technology is one of the topics under research by the Syscoin development team with our academic partners at TU Delft. In line with the calculation in the Lightning Networks white paper, payment channels using assets with Syscoin Core will bring theoretical capacity for each person on Earth (7.8 billion) to have five on-chain transactions per year, per person, without requiring anyone to enter a fee market (aka “wait for a block”). This exceeds the minimum LN expectation of two transactions per person, per year; one to exist on-chain and one to settle aggregated value.

Tools, Infrastructure & Documentation

Syscoin Bridge

Mainnet Demonstration of Syscoin Bridge with the Basic Attention Token ERC-20
A two-way blockchain interoperability system that uses Simple Payment Verification to enable:
  • Any Standard ERC-20 token to be moved from Ethereum to the Syscoin blockchain as a Syscoin Platform Token (SPT), and back to Ethereum
  • Any SPT to be moved from Syscoin to the Ethereum blockchain as an ERC-20 token, and back to Syscoin

Benefits

  • Permissionless
  • No counterparties involved
  • No trading mechanisms involved
  • No third-party liquidity providers required
  • Cross-chain Fractional Supply - 2-way peg - Token supply maintained globally
  • ERC-20s gain vastly improved transactionality with the Syscoin Token Platform, along with the security of bitcoin-core-compliant PoW.
  • SPTs gain access to all the tooling, applications and capabilities of Ethereum for ERC-20, including smart contracts.
https://preview.redd.it/l8t2m8ldh8e51.png?width=1180&format=png&auto=webp&s=b0a955a0181746dc79aff718bd0bf607d3c3aa23
https://preview.redd.it/26htnxzfh8e51.png?width=1180&format=png&auto=webp&s=d0383d3c2ee836c9f60b57eca35542e9545f741d

Source code

https://github.com/syscoin/?q=sysethereum
Main Subprojects

API

Tools to simplify using Syscoin Bridge as a service with dapps and wallets will be released some time after implementation of Syscoin Core 4.2. These will be based upon the same processes which are automated in the current live Sysethereum Dapp that is functioning with the Syscoin mainnet.

Documentation

Syscoin Bridge & How it Works (description and process flow)
Superblock Validation Battles
HOWTO: Provision the Bridge for your ERC-20
HOWTO: Setup an Agent
Developer & User Diligence

Trade-off

The Syscoin Ethereum Bridge is secured by Agent nodes participating in a decentralized and incentivized model that involves roles of Superblock challengers and submitters. This model is open to participation. The benefits here are trust-minimization, permissionless-ness, and potentially less legal/regulatory red-tape than interop mechanisms that involve liquidity providers and/or trading mechanisms.
The trade-off is that due to the decentralized nature there are cross-chain settlement times of one hour to cross from Ethereum to Syscoin, and three hours to cross from Syscoin to Ethereum. We are exploring ways to reduce this time while maintaining decentralization via zkp. Even so, an “instant bridge” experience could be provided by means of a third-party liquidity mechanism. That option exists but is not required for bridge functionality today. Typically bridges are used with batch value, not with high frequencies of smaller values, and generally it is advantageous to keep some value on both chains for maximum availability of utility. Even so, the cross-chain settlement time is good to mention here.

Cost

Ethereum -> Syscoin: Matic or Ethereum transaction fee for bridge contract interaction, negligible Syscoin transaction fee for minting tokens
Syscoin -> Ethereum: Negligible Syscoin transaction fee for burning tokens, 0.01% transaction fee paid to Bridge Agent in the form of the ERC-20, Matic or Ethereum transaction fee for contract interaction.

Z-DAG

Zero-Confirmation Directed Acyclic Graph is an instant settlement protocol that is used as a complementary system to proof-of-work (PoW) in the confirmation of Syscoin service transactions. In essence, a Z-DAG is simply a directed acyclic graph (DAG) where validating nodes verify the sequential ordering of transactions that are received in their memory pools. Z-DAG is used by the validating nodes across the network to ensure that there is absolute consensus on the ordering of transactions and no balances are overflowed (no double-spends).

Benefits

  • Unique fee-market that is more efficient for microtransaction redemption and settlement
  • Uses decentralized means to enable tokens with value transfer scalability that is comparable or exceeds that of credit card networks
  • Provides high throughput and secure fulfillment even if blocks are full
  • Probabilistic and interactive
  • 99.9999% security assurance within 10 seconds
  • Can serve payment channels as a resilience fallback that is faster and lower-cost than falling-back directly to a blockchain
  • Each Z-DAG transaction also settles onchain through Syscoin Core at 60-second block target using SHA-256 Proof of Work consensus
https://preview.redd.it/pgbx84jih8e51.png?width=1614&format=png&auto=webp&s=5f631d42a33dc698365eb8dd184b6d442def6640

Source code

https://github.com/syscoin/syscoin

API

Syscoin-js provides tooling for all Syscoin Core RPCs including interactivity with Z-DAG.

Documentation

Z-DAG White Paper
Useful read: An in-depth Z-DAG discussion between Syscoin Core developer Jag Sidhu and Brave Software Research Engineer Gonçalo Pestana

Trade-off

Z-DAG enables the ideal speed/security tradeoff to be determined per use-case in the application layer. It minimizes the sacrifice required to accept and redeem fast transfers/payments while providing more-than-ample security for microtransactions. This is supported on the premise that a Reddit user receiving points does need security yet generally doesn’t want nor need to wait for the same level of security as a nation-state settling an international trade debt. In any case, each Z-DAG transaction settles onchain at a block target of 60 seconds.

Syscoin Specs

Syscoin 3.0 White Paper
(4.0 white paper is pending. For improved scalability and less blockchain bloat, some features of v3 no longer exist in current v4: Specifically Marketplace Offers, Aliases, Escrow, Certificates, Pruning, Encrypted Messaging)
  • 16MB block bandwidth per minute assuming segwit witness carrying transactions, and transactions ~200 bytes on average
  • SHA256 merge mined with Bitcoin
  • UTXO asset layer, with base Syscoin layer sharing identical security policies as Bitcoin Core
  • Z-DAG on asset layer, bridge to Ethereum on asset layer
  • On-chain scaling with prospect of enabling enterprise grade reliable trustless payment processing with on/offchain hybrid solution
  • Focus only on Simple Value Transfers. MVP of blockchain consensus footprint is balances and ownership of them. Everything else can reduce data availability in exchange for scale (Ethereum 2.0 model). We leave that to other designs, we focus on transfers.
  • Future integrations of MAST/Taproot to get more complex value transfers without trading off trustlessness or decentralization.
  • Zero-knowledge Proofs are a cryptographic new frontier. We are dabbling here to generalize the concept of bridging and also verify the state of a chain efficiently. We also apply it in our Digital Identity projects at Blockchain Foundry (a publicly traded company which develops Syscoin softwares for clients). We are also looking to integrate privacy preserving payment channels for off-chain payments through zkSNARK hub & spoke design which does not suffer from the HTLC attack vectors evident on LN. Much of the issues plaguing Lightning Network can be resolved using a zkSNARK design whilst also providing the ability to do a multi-asset payment channel system. Currently we found a showstopper attack (American Call Option) on LN if we were to use multiple-assets. This would not exist in a system such as this.

Wallets

Web3 and mobile wallets are under active development by Blockchain Foundry Inc as WebAssembly applications and expected for release not long after mainnet deployment of Syscoin Core 4.2. Both of these will be multi-coin wallets that support Syscoin, SPTs, Ethereum, and ERC-20 tokens. The Web3 wallet will provide functionality similar to Metamask.
Syscoin Platform and tokens are already integrated with Blockbook. Custom hardware wallet support currently exists via ElectrumSys. First-class HW wallet integration through apps such as Ledger Live will exist after 4.2.
Current supported wallets
Syscoin Spark Desktop
Syscoin-Qt

Explorers

Mainnet: https://sys1.bcfn.ca (Blockbook)
Testnet: https://explorer-testnet.blockchainfoundry.co

Thank you for close consideration of our proposal. We look forward to feedback, and to working with the Reddit community to implement an ideal solution using Syscoin Platform!

submitted by sidhujag to ethereum [link] [comments]

Is there a curl or nc command to test node reachability?

I'm looking for a simple curl or nc command to tell me if a node is reachable. The only thing I can come up with when I read through the docs would be to send the "version" message described below, but it only partially succeeds.
Are there any simpler bits I can fling at the port to know if its up?
My failed attempt to send a version message to my node. I just hand crafted this message so the fact that the IP and port are wrong may be fatal. I'm not sure if the bitcoin protocol responds on the same connection or opens a separate port for the verack message.
``` f9beb4d9 ................... Start string: Mainnet 76657273696f6e0000000000 ... Command name: version + null padding 00000065 ................... Byte count: 101
72110100 ........................... Protocol version: 70002 0100000000000000 ................... Services: NODE_NETWORK bc8f5e5400000000 ................... [Epoch time][unix epoch time]: 1415483324
0100000000000000 ................... Receiving node's services 00000000000000000000ffffc61b6409 ... Receiving node's IPv6 address 208d ............................... Receiving node's port number
0100000000000000 ................... Transmitting node's services 00000000000000000000ffffcb0071c0 ... Transmitting node's IPv6 address 208d ............................... Transmitting node's port number
128035cbc97953f8 ................... Nonce
0f ................................. Bytes in user agent string: 15 2f5361746f7368693a302e392e332f ..... User agent: /Satoshi:0.9.3/
cf050500 ........................... Start height: 329167 01 ................................. Relay flag: true
5f1a69d2 ................... Checksum: SHA256(SHA256(<101 byte body>)) ```
Which would translate to:
xxd -r -p <<< "\ f9beb4d976657273696f6e00000000000000006572110100010000000000\ 0000bc8f5e5400000000010000000000000000000000000000000000ffff\ c61b6409208d010000000000000000000000000000000000ffffcb0071c0\ 208d128035cbc97953f80f2f5361746f7368693a302e392e332fcf050500\ 015f1a69d2" | \ nc -X 5 -x 127.0.0.1:9050 -v mybitcoin20node.onion 8333 | xxd -g 1 * - Obviously the onion address is redacted, but you get the point
This shows Connection to mybitcoin20node.onion 8333 port [tcp/*] succeeded!, but no data reply. I suppose the fact that it was able to bind to that address:port may be enough to imply that the node can be reached. Maybe not.
Thoughts?
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Six months in business, almost 100% uptime, 60.000 users and some changes

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA256
* We have reached 6 months (with almost 100% uptime) and 60.000 users!
* Users can now change their PGP keys by themselves. Access to old key is required
before changes. Back up your PGP key and do not lose it. Treat it with the same
respect you treat your cryptocurrency wallets (or real wallets for that matter).
Except under very special circumstances if you lose access to your PGP key you lose
access to your account. If your key expired you won't be able to log in, however
you can contact us, sign a message with your old key and we will restore access.
Speaking of PGP: STOP using Igolder! You are basically GIVING your address to a
third party. If you don't care about that maybe you care about the fact that some
vendors cannot decrypt Igolder messages. Use a modern PGP client, most of them are
point and click.
* Order payment window has been increased to 120 minutes (two hours). That is more
then enough to make a payment. Payments received after the order is canceled may be
lost, so if paying by Bitcoin make sure you use a decent transaction fee. Stop paying
your orders from online wallets / exchanges. Send the coin to your local wallet first
because paying from online wallets / exchanges:
- - Is dangerous for your privacy.
- - Some of them add extra verification/delays and you won't make the 2 hour window.
- - Some use a ridiculously low transaction fee and the transaction will be delayed.
Transfer to your local wallet first and don't be cheap on the transaction fee. Late
payments create unnecessary support work and you may lose your coins.
* Order history and messages are now deleted after 45 days instead of 30.
* Users can edit feedbacks for 30 days after an order is finalized (escrow released).
* Added "Top 20 Vendors" based on number of sales and feedback.
* Added random sort to "Search".
* On "Your orders" page we added the exact time when the auto finalize can be extended
or the order can be disputed. On the order tab you will find a yellow box showing the
exact date and time when Dispute and Extend AF buttons will be available.
Eg: "You can dispute/extend AF between 2020-02-28 18:44:51 and 2020-02-29 18:44:51 (UTC)"
* Added two new V3 mirrors:
http://kqqhwuqucdequr5buqkpdnqfdyimkro7g67oxifbs7s5r76czxpjxvqd.onion
http://kagznfeuoloobdegtvnh6cdmem7rpf3rt2emxfh7aaqnj2h7gn763gad.onion
* Bug fixes and stability improvements.
Thank you all for your business and support!
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----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=uo5S
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
submitted by gaugeboy to whitehousemarket_ [link] [comments]

semi-quick answers to common questions of new people

so people often ask similar questions over here and because they are getting probably kinda annoying over time to many I just try to answer as many as I find. if you have more that would fit here, add them to the comments

submitted by My1xT to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

What is PYRK?

What is PYRK?
Greetings. 🤗 Today we will tell you about the PYRK project and about its features.
💡 PYRK is a privacy centric cryptographic currency based on the work of Bitcoin, Dash, and Digibyte.
📌 Built for the community, we've taken some of the best features of the top utility coins to create a new coin which launched on May 12th, 2020.
⚙️ PYRK’s improvements include triple algorithm Proof of Work with Multishield difficulty adjustment, Masternodes, Private Send, Community Fund Governance, and Simple Tokens based loosely on the Color Coins protocol.
🔹 PYRK has borrowed from DASH all the best features. Fast work speed. The ability to deploy masternodes and the ease of mining, and all this at very low fees.
🔹 Multishield is a "difficulty retargeting" method to maintain the "average" block timing, by automatically changing the complexity of mining on the network.
🔹 Thanks to the PYRK’s Triple Proof-of-Work algorithm, it is possible to mine on different algorithms, including SHA256, Scrypt, and X11. Thus, it is very unlikely for a single miner to attain 100% of the hash rate of a single algorithm.
🔹 In PYRK, anonymity is the cornerstone, so we use a technology called PrivateSend, originally developed by DASH. PrivateSend decentrally mixes all your coins with strangers, giving newly generated addresses, allowing you to maximize transaction privacy.
🔹 You can run a masternode. In PYRK Masternodes are all paid from generated block rewards. The Masternode rewards start at block 10,000 and the master node network receives 20% of the block reward.
📢 Read more about the PYRK project and why it is worth investing in on our website: https://pyrk.org/
https://preview.redd.it/vwty1esxlej51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=c168950275250eeb05eb65adafa6dced51bded5b
submitted by VS_community to pyrk [link] [comments]

My top 5 (and more) arguments against the mining tax as implemented in ABC 0.21.0

These are mine, but I'd like to hear yours in the comments!
  1. Corrupting influence. Mixing monetary policy (money supply regulation, in Bitcoin: coin creation) and fiscal policy (roughly: government spending and taxing) is what central banks already do, and we know the results. Bitcoin was not designed to deliver such a mix - the newly created coin was, up to now, fully owned by the miner creating the block, and matures after a certain time when it can be spent. Miners can voluntary spend their coinbase outputs to other parties already. In this way fiscal decisions are decentralized as much possible - meaning every miner / pool gets to decide how to spend 100% of their mining block reward (or share thereof). Do you already see how Bitcoin's design removes all possible financial intermediaries - including any trusted "government" or "fund" that decides how to spend other peoples' money? If so, you already get my first point. Peter Rizun has mentioned the legal concerns around directing colluding miner funds to certain entities with expectation of results. IANAL, but I think the argument that instituting such a change on protocol level could bring BCH into conflict with security law (Howey Test) should be seriously examined.
  2. Due to how information is distributed, a centrally planned economy cannot match the efficiency of the open market. A free market is all that is needed to fund things. Miners and anyone else can already fund any kind of development (or other activities) through the existing protocol. Furthermore, we know there are successful methods of funding public goods in voluntary ways through Assurance Contracts. These have not been deployed on Bitcoin Cash before (early crowdfunding systems didn't implement them properly), but are basically ready to go now (Flipstarter) and could offer BCH an improvement even over other successful systems like Monero's Community Crowdfunding System (CCS) due to the fact that we can do this non-custodially via Bitcoin Cash scripts. Going for a miner tax based "dev fund" with nebulous administration and all the accompanying hazards seems a poor choice before we tried the voluntary route which preserves the original economic freedom and incentives of Bitcoin Cash.
  3. Increased centralization of mining and development. Going with the plan would work counter to a decentralized protocol client environment, and centralize even more power with the dominant client (ABC). The donation address whitelist is hardcoded into the client. Miners/pools who don't obey the new rules of contributing 5% of block reward to active whitelisted addresses have their blocks orphaned, lowering the chain hashrate (security) and driving away small miners who might not be able to afford the margin. This centralizes mining on BCH beyond what's necessary. Again, a free market will deliver better security and service!
  4. Sold with a veneer of false pretenses. We are told that other (non-BCH) SHA256 miners will effectively pay the cost, but this argument has been effectively debunked. The cost is paid for all BCH holders, as it comes out of the agreed upon money supply inflation. It comes at the cost of lowered BCH chain hashrate = security, with the concomitant increased risk of other miners executing attacks on BCH. Yet, holders don't get to vote right now, except by selling their BCH or converting it into hashpower. Did you know financial markets can offer instruments to let holders express their opinion about possible futures (whether they'd prefer one outcome or another) with slight or no punishment in the case of no split - i.e. actually could facilitate a no-split outcome that many BCH users & holders recognize as preferable? Another pretense is that the plan, if successful, would terminate after a limited time. This is not what regularly happens in taxpayer-funded government programs, and it is paradoxical to assume that a measure to support ongoing maintenance and development would, if deemed successful in a trial run, be expected to be terminated. Especially if the people receiving the funds are literally the ones deciding and writing the rules. In governments we at least came up with separation of powers (legislative, judicial, executive). Why should be mix up powers again? Absolute power corrupts absolutely. Serious developers also recognize that the dollar amounts we are talking about in the proposed plan are too low to expect completion within the previously announced limited timeframes. Giving a good hint that the limited timeframe was a nothing but a public pacifier when planners already expect it to continue.
  5. The proposal is poorly conceived in terms of safety against malicious activation. Only 66% of hashrate need to vote for it over a two week period. Previously, BCH miners objected to any form of hashrate voting on BCH with the argument that it is still a very-low hashrate minority fork. That has not changed materially, but suddenly we are supposed to accept that hashrate voting on our minority coin is safe. Can't have it both ways. As an additional point, there is no 6 month sunset clause built into the implementation, and it seems removed from the plan agreed between ABC and miners (as per recent ABC website post). This completely reneges on the "update" previously presented to the community in that regard, re-affirming that there is no serious commitment to ending this after a limited time.
I probably squeezed in too many explanations.
Originally my aim was to get a short summary. I should try to sum it up better, but I know there are many people who could do a much better job at that. Please speak up, correct me where you feel I'm wrong, and add points that you think are missing!
P.S. I fully realize that the ones pushing this plan are not likely to be swayed by any of these arguments.
I am presenting mine here in hopes to encourage further discussion, and I hope you will do the same, so everyone is armed with knowledge, going into what looks like it could be an escalating dispute within our community.
Perhaps though, there is a minute chance that backers of the plan could see the danger in the split that they are creating. I still have hope, but I'm also prepared to act.
submitted by ftrader to btc [link] [comments]

This is just a theory. What do you guys think?

Just theory if Satoshi wrote the name of the creator which would be 256th puzzle of a puzzle game 14 years ago, and the card has written "find me" in Japanese at side forming this puzzle. Just for looking this picture is it possible to find this gentleman on the internet as the location from the picture been discovered " Kaysersberg, Alsace, France". It would be a great coincidence if the owner of the 256th card was really Satoshi in a ranking of 256 cards? This will be very important figure for 256 Bitcoin value. People might on here might ask why and explain your theory? Well just for a explanation this puzzle is complex and if his card is 256th puzzle card and is a value of 256. What if the answer is 2SHA256 which SHA stands for Secure Hash Algorithm that Bitcoin has been using for mining and address generation. This hash is one of those high security cryptography functions and also the length would have data fix that might contribute of harmony between these blocks.
1.) For example, word would be "squanch" with SHA256 encryption -> “5bfdd901369fbb2ae5052ab5307c74f97651e09bd83e80cf3153952bb81cc7b8”.
2.) satoshi -> DA2876B3EB31EDB4436FA4650673FC6F01F90DE2F1793C4EC332B2387B09726F
3.) Satoshi -> 002688CC350A5333A87FA622EACEC626C3D1C0EBF9F3793DE3885FA254D7E393
** you can play around with it => https://passwordsgenerator.net/sha256-hash-generato **
SHA256 with its code consist 32 bits and 64 digits, so we should not get too far from solving this puzzles some how if this was an method of solving this question via value. Also, the puzzle from this game began in which is called "The city of Perplex". This game has a original concept and also promise reward $200,000 when all the puzzles on the cards are solved. But, think about it f the 256th card is Satoshi that has not been solved it has not been resolved on card number 238. As you can imagine, the 256th card, which is “Satoshi”, has not been resolved. Otherwise, it has not been resolved on card number 238. Hint that our card gives to everyone to solve the puzzle is “ My name is Satoshi ...”. Needless to say with the game has been on the market since 1-2 years before the generation of Bitcoin and Crypto has started. Although I"m also thinking the man might not be Satoshi as his a player, so looking that either looks and style similar is only hope.
submitted by LeftSubstance to FindSatoshi [link] [comments]

Choosing The Best Multi-Currency Wallet For Crypto in 2020

Crypto differs from fiat in terms of storage. It is saved not in some kind of virtual bank, but directly in the blockchain. The coins, information on the distribution of digital assets between users, transaction history – all this data is stored by the chain. Such data cannot be changed or erased in any way. And without a crypto wallet, you cannot manage your assets.

Let’s have a look at different types of crypto wallets.

A cryptocurrency wallet stores your “private” and “public” keys used to send and receive various crypto tokens. The interface and design of the programs help users to get all the necessary information about their digital savings.
There are two types of wallets:

How do cryptocurrency wallets work?

Cryptocurrency wallets are not designed to actually store digital assets; instead, they provide the tools necessary to interact with the blockchain network. The wallet includes a public address, which is an identifier in the form of a set of letters and numbers. This address is a kind of location on the blockchain where you can send coins. You can share your public address with another user to receive funds, but you should never show your private key to anyone.
A private key provides access to your cryptocurrencies, regardless of which wallet you use. Thus, even if your computer or smartphone was compromised, you can still access your funds from any other device, provided that you have the appropriate private key (or seed phrase).

Types of wallets

Web wallet

This type of wallet is suitable for beginners, since it does not require the purchase of devices, software installation, or downloading the blockchain. It is enough for the user to register on the site. Web wallets are simple and convenient to use, they do not take up space on the HDD and are constantly synchronized with the blockchain network, even when your computer is offline.
Cryptopay enables customers to transfer money directly between their Cryptopay wallet and SEPA (Single Euro Payments Area) bank account, store their funds safely in a multi-coin portfolio, protected by two-factor authentication to increase security.
Coinbase is a trading service that many retailers use to receive digital currencies from sales. Private keys are stored on the server, and client funds are stored on a cold wallet. You can enable two-factor authentication and install the smartphone app.

Desktop wallet

The local wallet is installed on the hard drive and loaded with the operating system. Such wallets are divided into “thick” (full-node clients) and “thin” (light-node clients). Thick ones can take up to hundreds of gigabytes of hard drive space. Thin local wallet is actually a program that makes requests to the blockchain through a trusted site.
Bitcoin Core is a Bitcoin wallet created by the Bitcoin Foundation. If you want to get a truly secure place for your digital assets, choose this thick desktop wallet.
Exodus is a universal thin crypto wallet. It supports 100+ altcoins and has a built-in exchange service. Also, Exodus can interact with the Trezor Crypto Hardware Wallet.

Mobile phone and browser wallets

Mobile wallets are available through special applications. You can use them for shopping in real stores where crypto is accepted – just like ApplePay.
Benefits of Mobile Wallets:
Disadvantages of mobile wallets:
Coinomi is a multi-currency application with two integrated exchange services (Shapeshift and Changelly). The wallet supports 100+ virtual coins, the keys are stored exclusively in the application.
Browser wallet is an extension for Chrome and Opera browsers. It is very easy to use: you just enter seed phrases and get access to the savings.
The Jaxx extension for Chrome from the team of developers of the browser wallet KryptoKit, supports not only Bitcoin, but Ethereum as well.

Hardware wallet

This is the most reliable option for saving virtual assets. They look like ordinary USB flash drives. The user inserts a USB, logs on a wallet program by entering a password and thus gets access to the funds. All operations are performed not in the system, but directly on the flash drive itself, which eliminates extraneous access to data.
Trezor wallet supports most of the top coins, it can be synchronized with the MyEtherWallet online wallet, as well as Chrome and Firefox browsers to get access to crypto funds.
Ledger Nano S is miniature, safe, and easy to use and has several levels of protection. Asset management is performed through the Ledger Manager utility.

Paper wallet

A paper wallet is a piece of paper that usually has QR codes that can be quickly scanned to get the address to a crypto account. The main advantage of services like BitAddress and Bitcoin Paper Wallet is that the keys are actually stored offline, which makes them immune to hacker attacks. The main drawback, however, is that the paper wallet can be stolen or lost.

Which wallet is the safest?

An offline crypto wallet is the most reliable one. You can install a local wallet on a PC that is not connected to the Internet and store your digital assets on it, but this is not very convenient if you need to quickly complete a transaction.

Conclusion

The choice depends on how you plan to use your tokens. Small amounts of crypto can be stored on thin local or Internet wallets, and for long-term storage of large amounts, it is better to get thick or hardware wallets. In any case, remember to strictly observe all security measures.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to u/CoinjoyAssistant [link] [comments]

Questions Regarding BTC Mining

I have been wondering about some of the details related to bitcoin mining bit couldn't find an answer, I would bet the answer can be found was I capable of looking up the mining algorithms but I'm not that savvy (not yet at least) so here it goes.
I understand that during mining, the miners take the hash calculated from a given block then appends a nonce to it and calculate SHA256 for the whole expression, if the hash value is larger than the limit set by mining difficulty, the miner must attempt again the SHA256 calculation again by appending a different nonce and repeat until a hash smaller than the limit is found.
What I wanted to ask is the following:
1) Is my understanding above correct? If not then please disregard the below questions since they would be garbage most likely (correcting the fault lines in my understanding would more than enough).
2) How are these nonces to be appended chosen? Are they chosen randomly at every attempt or changed sequentially by adding 1 for example?
3) Does the bitcoin blockchain enforces the use of a specific algorithm for generating nonces or is it left to the miners to concoct their own algorithms as they see fit? (If enforced by the bitcoin block chain, I'd appreciate an explanation why)
4) If the choice is left to miners to generate nonces as they see fit, what is the best approach to generating these nonces available?
5) In a mining pools where many ASICs are hashing together, is there any coordination at the pool or at least at individual ASIC miner level to ensure no two ASIC chips are calculating the hash for the same nonce while trying to find the block? If not, what are the difficulties preventing such an implementation?
Thanks in advance and if there are any useful resources addressing these questions please share them especially ones describing the mining algorithm generating nonces.
submitted by BitcoinAsks to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

No, your Bitcoin is not at risk from quantum computing. You got played.

The claim: Quantum computers can hack bitcoin and its right around the corner.
Reality:
There is no known way that quantum computers can break SHA256 (only the signing elliptic curve/ECDSA). So cold wallets will always be safe (this means you have not made an outgoing transaction in that wallet)
This also means you will always be safe in actively making transactions as long as wallet providers provide the functionality to constantly move your funds to a new address on each transaction (this already exists in several wallets).
There is a larger discussion on upgrading bitcoin, the fact that quantum computers are not even close to being able to crack ECDSA, etc. But I'm just going to leave it at what I said above. Your Bitcoin is not at risk from quantum computing.
 
The fud campaigns on quantum computing has been organized by traders half a dozen times over the past 5 years at the end of consolidation triangles, which is exactly what happened this time.
submitted by Trident1000 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Reddcoin (RDD) 02/20 Progress Report - Core Wallet v3.1 Evolution & PoSV v2 - Commits & More Commits to v3.1! (Bitcoin Core 0.10, MacOS Catalina, QT Enhanced Speed and Security and more!)

Reddcoin (RDD) Core Dev Team Informal Progress Report, Feb 2020 - As any blockchain or software expert will confirm, the hardest part of making successful progress in blockchain and crypto is invisible to most users. As developers, the Reddcoin Core team relies on internal experts like John Nash, contributors offering their own code improvements to our repos (which we would love to see more of!) and especially upstream commits from experts working on open source projects like Bitcoin itself. We'd like tothank each and everyone who's hard work has contributed to this progress.
As part of Reddcoin's evolution, and in order to include required security fixes, speed improvements that are long overdue, the team has up to this point incorporated the following code commits since our last v3.0.1 public release. In attempting to solve the relatively minor font display issue with MacOS Catalina, we uncovered a complicated interweaving of updates between Reddcoin Core, QT software, MacOS SDK, Bitcoin Core and related libraries and dependencies that mandated we take a holistic approach to both solve the Catalina display problem, but in doing so, prepare a more streamlined overall build and test system, allowing the team to roll out more frequent and more secure updates in the future. And also to include some badly needed fixes in the current version of Core, which we have tentatively labeled Reddcoin Core Wallet v3.1.
Note: As indicated below, v3.1 is NOT YET AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD BY PUBLIC. We wil advise when it is.
The new v3.1 version should be ready for internal QA and build testing by the end of this week, with luck, and will be turned over to the public shortly thereafter once testing has proven no unexpected issues have been introduced. We know the delay has been a bit extended for our ReddHead MacOS Catalina stakers, and we hope to have them all aboard soon. We have moved with all possible speed while attempting to incorproate all the required work, testing, and ensuring security and safety for our ReddHeads.
Which leads us to: PoSV v2 activation and the supermajority on Mainnet at the time of this writing has reached 5625/9000 blocks or 62.5%. We have progressed quite well and without any reported user issues since release, but we need all of the community to participate! This activation, much like the funding mechanisms currently being debated by BCH and others, and employed by DASH, will mean not only a catalyst for Reddcoin but ensure it's future by providing funding for the dev team. As a personal plea from the team, please help us support the PoSV v2 activation by staking your RDD, no matter how large or small your amount of stake.
Every block and every RDD counts, and if you don't know how, we'll teach you! Live chat is fun as well as providing tech support you can trust from devs and community ReddHead members. Join us today in staking and online and collect some RDD "rain" from users and devs alike!
If you're holding Reddcoin and not staking, or you haven't upgraded your v2.x wallet to v3.0.1 (current release), we need you to help achieve consensus and activate PoSV v2! For details, see the pinned message here or our website or medium channel. Upgrade is simple and takes moments; if you're nervous or unsure, we're here to help live in Telegram or Discord, as well as other chat programs. See our website for links.
Look for more updates shortly as our long-anticipated Reddcoin Payment Gateway and Merchant Services API come online with point-of-sale support, as we announce the cross-crypto-project Aussie firefighter fundraiser program, as well as a comprehensive update to our development roadmap and more.
Work has restarted on ReddID and multiple initiatives are underway to begin educating and sharing information about ReddID, what it is, and how to use it, as we approach a releasable ReddID product. We enthusiastically encourage anyone interested in working to bring these efforts to life, whether writers, UX/UI experts, big data analysts, graphic artists, coders, front-end, back-end, AI, DevOps, the Reddcoin Core dev team is growing, and there's more opportunity and work than ever!
Bring your talents to a community and dev team that truly appreciates it, and share the Reddcoin Love!
And now, lots of commits. As v3.1 is not yet quite ready for public release, these commits have not been pushed publicly, but in the interests of sharing progress transparently, and including our ReddHead community in the process, see below for mind-numbing technical detail of work accomplished.
e5c143404 - - 2014-08-07 - Ross Nicoll - Changed LevelDB cursors to use scoped pointers to ensure destruction when going out of scope. *99a7dba2e - - 2014-08-15 - Cory Fields - tests: fix test-runner for osx. Closes ##4708 *8c667f1be - - 2014-08-15 - Cory Fields - build: add funcs.mk to the list of meta-depends *bcc1b2b2f - - 2014-08-15 - Cory Fields - depends: fix shasum on osx < 10.9 *54dac77d1 - - 2014-08-18 - Cory Fields - build: add option for reducing exports (v2) *6fb9611c0 - - 2014-08-16 - randy-waterhouse - build : fix CPPFLAGS for libbitcoin_cli *9958cc923 - - 2014-08-16 - randy-waterhouse - build: Add --with-utils (bitcoin-cli and bitcoin-tx, default=yes). Help string consistency tweaks. Target sanity check fix. *342aa98ea - - 2014-08-07 - Cory Fields - build: fix automake warnings about the use of INCLUDES *46db8ad51 - - 2020-02-18 - John Nash - build: add build.h to the correct target *a24de1e4c - - 2014-11-26 - Pavel Janík - Use complete path to include bitcoin-config.h. *fd8f506e5 - - 2014-08-04 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - qt: Demote ReportInvalidCertificate message to qDebug *f12aaf3b1 - - 2020-02-17 - John Nash - build: QT5 compiled with fPIC require fPIC to be enabled, fPIE is not enough *7a991b37e - - 2014-08-12 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - build: check for sys/prctl.h in the proper way *2cfa63a48 - - 2014-08-11 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - build: Add mention of --disable-wallet to bdb48 error messages *9aa580f04 - - 2014-07-23 - Cory Fields - depends: add shared dependency builder *8853d4645 - - 2014-08-08 - Philip Kaufmann - [Qt] move SubstituteFonts() above ToolTipToRichTextFilter *0c98e21db - - 2014-08-02 - Ross Nicoll - URLs containing a / after the address no longer cause parsing errors. *7baa77731 - - 2014-08-07 - ntrgn - Fixes ignored qt 4.8 codecs path on windows when configuring with --with-qt-libdir *2a3df4617 - - 2014-08-06 - Cory Fields - qt: fix unicode character display on osx when building with 10.7 sdk *71a36303d - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: fix race in 'make deploy' for windows *077295498 - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: Fix 'make deploy' when binaries haven't been built yet *ffdcc4d7d - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: hook up qt translations for static osx packaging *25a7e9c90 - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: add --with-qt-translationdir to configure for use with static qt *11cfcef37 - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: teach macdeploy the -translations-dir argument, for use with static qt *4c4ae35b1 - - 2014-07-23 - Cory Fields - build: Find the proper xcb/pcre dependencies *942e77dd2 - - 2014-08-06 - Cory Fields - build: silence mingw fpic warning spew *e73e2b834 - - 2014-06-27 - Huang Le - Use async name resolving to improve net thread responsiveness *c88e76e8e - - 2014-07-23 - Cory Fields - build: don't let libtool insert rpath into binaries *18e14e11c - - 2014-08-05 - ntrgn - build: Fix windows configure when using --with-qt-libdir *bb92d65c4 - - 2014-07-31 - Cory Fields - test: don't let the port number exceed the legal range *62b95290a - - 2014-06-18 - Cory Fields - test: redirect comparison tool output to stdout *cefe447e9 - - 2014-07-22 - Cory Fields - gitian: remove unneeded option after last commit *9347402ca - - 2014-07-21 - Cory Fields - build: fix broken boost chrono check on some platforms *c9ed039cf - - 2014-06-03 - Cory Fields - build: fix whitespace in pkg-config variable *3bcc5ad37 - - 2014-06-03 - Cory Fields - build: allow linux and osx to build against static qt5 *01a44ba90 - - 2014-07-17 - Cory Fields - build: silence false errors during make clean *d1fbf7ba2 - - 2014-07-08 - Cory Fields - build: fix win32 static linking after libtool merge *005ae2fa4 - - 2014-07-08 - Cory Fields - build: re-add AM_LDFLAGS where it's overridden *37043076d - - 2014-07-02 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - Fix the Qt5 build after d95ba75 *f3b4bbf40 - - 2014-07-01 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - qt: Change serious messages from qDebug to qWarning *f4706f753 - - 2014-07-01 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - qt: Log messages with type>QtDebugMsg as non-debug *98e85fa1f - - 2014-06-06 - Pieter Wuille - libsecp256k1 integration *5f1f2e226 - - 2020-02-17 - John Nash - Merge branch 'switch_verification_code' into Build *1f30416c9 - - 2014-02-07 - Pieter Wuille - Also switch the (unused) verification code to low-s instead of even-s. *1c093d55e - - 2014-06-06 - Cory Fields - secp256k1: Add build-side changes for libsecp256k1 *7f3114484 - - 2014-06-06 - Cory Fields - secp256k1: add libtool as a dependency *2531f9299 - - 2020-02-17 - John Nash - Move network-time related functions to timedata.cpp/h *d003e4c57 - - 2020-02-16 - John Nash - build: fix build weirdness after 54372482. *7035f5034 - - 2020-02-16 - John Nash - Add ::OUTPUT_SIZE *2a864c4d8 - - 2014-06-09 - Cory Fields - crypto: create a separate lib for crypto functions *03a4e4c70 - - 2014-06-09 - Cory Fields - crypto: explicitly check for byte read/write functions *a78462a2a - - 2014-06-09 - Cory Fields - build: move bitcoin-config.h to its own directory *a885721c4 - - 2014-05-31 - Pieter Wuille - Extend and move all crypto tests to crypto_tests.cpp *5f308f528 - - 2014-05-03 - Pieter Wuille - Move {Read,Write}{LE,BE}{32,64} to common.h and use builtins if possible *0161cc426 - - 2014-05-01 - Pieter Wuille - Add built-in RIPEMD-160 implementation *deefc27c0 - - 2014-04-28 - Pieter Wuille - Move crypto implementations to src/crypto/ *d6a12182b - - 2014-04-28 - Pieter Wuille - Add built-in SHA-1 implementation. *c3c4f9f2e - - 2014-04-27 - Pieter Wuille - Switch miner.cpp to use sha2 instead of OpenSSL. *b6ed6def9 - - 2014-04-28 - Pieter Wuille - Remove getwork() RPC call *0a09c1c60 - - 2014-04-26 - Pieter Wuille - Switch script.cpp and hash.cpp to use sha2.cpp instead of OpenSSL. *8ed091692 - - 2014-04-20 - Pieter Wuille - Add a built-in SHA256/SHA512 implementation. *0c4c99b3f - - 2014-06-21 - Philip Kaufmann - small cleanup in src/compat .h and .cpp *ab1369745 - - 2014-06-13 - Cory Fields - sanity: hook up sanity checks *f598c67e0 - - 2014-06-13 - Cory Fields - sanity: add libc/stdlib sanity checks *b241b3e13 - - 2014-06-13 - Cory Fields - sanity: autoconf check for sys/select.h *cad980a4f - - 2019-07-03 - John Nash - build: Add a top-level forwarding target for src/ objects *f4533ee1c - - 2019-07-03 - John Nash - build: qt: split locale resources. Fixes non-deterministic distcheck *4a0e46e76 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: fix version dependency *2f61699d9 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: quit abusing AMCPPFLAGS *99b60ba49 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: avoid the use of top and abs_ dir paths *c8f673d5d - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: Tidy up file generation output *5318bce57 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: nuke Makefile.include from orbit *672a25349 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: add stub makefiles for easier subdir builds *562b7c5a6 - - 2020-02-08 - John Nash - build: delete old Makefile.am's *066120079 - - 2020-02-08 - John Nash - build: Switch to non-recursive make
Whew! No wonder it's taken the dev team a while! :)
TL;DR: Trying to fix MacOS Catalina font display led to requiring all kinds of work to migrate and evolve the Reddcoin Core software with Apple, Bitcoin and QT components. Lots of work done, v3.1 public release soon. Also other exciting things and ReddID back under active dev effort.
submitted by TechAdept to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Why the proposed soft-fork WILL cause a chain-split, a hash-war and market uncertainty

The idea behind a funding plan itself is not a bad one. Developers need funding to maintain the network. Yet the proposed solution is a very bad one, here is why.
BCH is a minority chain. There are many miners that have more hashrate than the total hashrate that is mining BCH at a given time. This is a cause for concern since it means (not) enforcing a soft-fork is easy for attackers that (at the moment) have more than 2% of the total SHA256 hashrate.
If you think this through logically, one (or more parties) will mine BCH without the proposed soft-fork, even if it's only to disturb BCH (for example: Coingeek and Nchain). If they are able to get 51% or more of the hashrate every Bitcoin Cash node will follow that chain. This means 2 chains exists, yet no node implementation will follow the soft-forked chain if they are behind in PoW.
This will start (yet another) hash-war (but this time for real) since both sides will want to find 10 blocks first so they will be the winning chain permanently (because of the re-org protection). This will scare users, businesses and investors and will probably cause for another reduction in price, and will set BCH back for years to come.
I think the current proposed implementation is just a very stupid idea, like these miners want BCH to be attacked. Doing this as a hard-fork can be considered, but should be discussed with the community and other developers. But i don't think that is a good idea in the current form either (sending 12.5% of block reward to a centrally controlled address) and may also cause for different node implementation (or a forked ABC node) that will not include this change. It seems like this hasn't been thought through as well and doing this on such short notice (by may 15th) will hurt BCH BADLY. Please at least discuss this with the community instead introducing such a major change without thinking about the consequences.
submitted by backlogg to btc [link] [comments]

12632 BTC PUZZLE ~(Approximately $80 Million)

12632 BTC PUZZLE ~(Approximately $80 Million)

12632.37162517 BTC hidden in this picture below:
12632.37162517 BTC hidden in 1CoV19
Figure it out, find the key to the Bitcoin, and claim the prize.
Whoever cracks the code can do whatever he/she wants (including donating to charity).
While solving the puzzle you can find private keys to 5 more BTC addresses with huge value.
Congrats to the genius who figures it out.
View the address:16eht5osxarvsX9rFBuNgey18N3TFxeE1P
HINTS:
Address: 1CoV19Nw1731inbx38t3Y2mcdnCehA9FmJ
12 Words 1CoV19.jpeg
A=16eht5osxarvsX9rFBuNgey18N3TFxeE1P
B=1CoV19Nw1731inbx38t3Y2mcdnCehA9FmJ
Private Key A= SHA256(passphrase) 1CoV19.jpeg + B
Mnemonic Code Converter
Sha256 — Reverse lookup, unhash and decrypt

Example:
This private key: KyTxSACvHPPDWnuE9cVi86kDgs59UFyVwx2Y3LPpAs88TqEdCKvb
The public address is:13JNB8GtymAPaqAoxRZrN2EgmzZLCkbPsh
The raw bytes for the private key:4300d94bef2ee84bd9d0781398fd96daf98e419e403adc41957fb679dfa1facd
These bytes are actually sha256 of this public address! 1LGUyTbp7nbqp8NQy2tkc3QEjy7CWwdAJj
....more Examples:
1HwxL1vutUc42ikh3RBnM4v2dVRHPTrTve from Sha256(1FfmbHfnpaZjKFvyi1okTjJJusN455paPH)
1FNF3xfTE53LVLQMvH6qteVqrNzwn2g2H8 from Sha256(1H21ndKEuMqZbeMMCqrYArCdV8WeicGehB
13FzEhD3WpX682G7b446NFZV6TXHH7BaQv Sha256(1E1rSGgugyNYF3TTr12pedv4UHoWxv5CeD)
1LVRWmpfKKcRZcKvi5ZGWGx5wU1HCNEdZZ Sha256(1CVPe9A5xFoQBEYhFP46nRrzf9wCS4KLFm)
1HhNZhMm4YFPSFvUXE6wLYPx63BF7MRJCJ Sha256(145Sph2eiNGp5WVAkdJKg9Z2PMhTGSS9iT)
1G6qfGz7eVDBGDJEy6Jw6Gkg8zaoWku8W5 Sha256(18EF7uwoJnKx7YAg72DUv4Xqbyd4a32P9f)
1MNhKuKbpPjELGJA5BRrJ4qw8RajGESLz6 Sha256(15WLziyvhPu1qVKkQ62ooEnCEu8vpyuTR5)
18XAotZvJNoaDKY7dkfNHuTrAzguazetHE Sha256(15SP99eiBZ43SMuzzCc9AaccuTxF5AQaat)
1HamTvNJfggDioTbPgnC2ujQpCj4BEJqu Sha256(14nuZCWe76kWigUKAjFxyJLFHQyLTsKXYk)
17iqGkzW5Y7miJjd5B2gP5Eztx8kcCDwRM Sha256(1MB3L1eTnHo1nQSN7Lmgepb7iipWqFjhYX)
15M7QfReFDY2SZssyBALDQTFVV1VDdVBLA Sha256(16bjY7SynPYKrTQULjHy8on3WENxCmK4ix)
1LgwKwv9kt8BwVvn6bVWj8KcqpP9JSP1Mh Sha256(1Q81rAHbNebKiNH7HD9Mh2xtH6jgzbAxoF)


Address: 1CoV19Nw1731inbx38t3Y2mcdnCehA9FmJ
will be the next Puzzle if the community decides to raise its value.
Its private key hints will revealed here to solve.
Good Luck .....
submitted by CovidBTC to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

【NeoLine Talk】The life cycle of the private key

【NeoLine Talk】The life cycle of the private key

https://preview.redd.it/yeib74adcoy41.png?width=900&format=png&auto=webp&s=8e50b543a01a25860c7c732c17a1f2da338cd7c6
In the blockchain system, since there is no centralized organization responsible for managing the backup user sensitive data, the generation, storage, use, retrieval, destruction, and update of the user’s private key all need to be guaranteed by the user. Therefore, for the entire life cycle of the private key, there needs to be a strict way to manage and control it, to ensure the security of the asset.
Today ’s NeoLine Talk, let ’s talk about how to ensure the security of the private key life cycle.

Private key generation

Private key: A 256-bit binary random number whose quality depends entirely on the quality of the random number that generated the private key. If the randomness of the key generation process is insufficient to make it predictable, then all subsequent security protection measures will be in vain.
Random numbers are the cornerstone of information security systems based on modern cryptography. The security of the entire system depends entirely on the generation efficiency and quality of random number sequences. The core of high-quality random numbers is “unpredictability”. There are two types of random numbers: pseudo-random and true random.
Pseudo-random is also called pseudo-random. It generally relies on seeds and algorithms. Knowing the seeds or the random numbers that have been generated, you can get the next random numbers, which is predictable. The current mainstream blockchain system is the private key generated by this method …
True random numbers are generally based on the design of the hardware. Random numbers are generated according to the external temperature, voltage, electromagnetic field, environmental noise, etc., and the unpredictability of randomness is greatly increased. All security cryptographic chips in the financial field adopt this design.

Let’s see in detail how to generate a private key from a random number?

The first step in generating a private key is also the most important. It is to find a sufficiently secure source of entropy, that is, a source of randomness. Generating a Bitcoin private key is essentially the same as “choose a number between 1 and 2256”. As long as the selected results are unpredictable or unrepeatable, the specific method of selecting numbers is not important. Bitcoin software uses a random number generator at the bottom of the operating system to generate 256 bits of entropy (randomness). Normally, the operating system random number generator is initialized by an artificial random source, and it may also need to be initialized by shaking the mouse continuously within a few seconds.
More precisely, the private key can be any number between 1 and n-1, where n is a constant (n = 1.158 * 1077, slightly less than 2256) and is defined by the order of the elliptic curve used by Bitcoin. To generate such a private key, we randomly choose a 256-bit number and check whether it is less than n-1. From a programming point of view, it is generally by taking a long string of random bytes from a cryptographically secure random source and using the SHA256 hash algorithm to perform operations, so that a 256-bit number can be easily generated. If the operation result is less than n-1, we have a suitable private key. Otherwise, we repeat it with another random number.

Private key storage

Each bitcoin address corresponds to a private key, and mastering the private key means mastering the bitcoin in its corresponding address. In layman’s terms, a key opens a lock. If the Bitcoin address is a lock, then the private key is the key to the lock.
The storage and use of private keys are generally divided into soft and hard implementations.
Soft implementation, storage, and use are in the form of software. After the key is generated, it is stored in the user terminal or hosted on the server as a file or character string. When used, the private key plain text is read directly or through simple password control into the memory, and the private key calculation is completed by the CPU. This storage and use method has a lot of security risks and is easy to be copied, stolen, brute-forced by hackers or ghosts.
Hard implementation generally relies on a dedicated cryptographic security chip or cryptographic device as a carrier. There are generally mechanisms such as physical protection, sensitive data protection, and key protection to ensure that the private key must be generated by dedicated hardware. At any time and under any circumstances, the private key cannot appear outside the cryptographic device in clear text; the key stored inside the cryptographic device should have an effective key protection mechanism to prevent dissection, detection, and illegal reading. The private key cannot be exported, and only the signature value can be calculated and output.
But whether it is soft or hard, as long as others know your private key, you can transfer your assets. Remember, whoever holds the private key is the real owner of the asset.

Safe use of private keys

When using the private key, it is necessary to ensure the security of the use environment, and access, reading, and writing of the private key file need to have relevant permission control. After the use is completed, all sensitive data cached in the memory needs to be cleared using a dedicated function to prevent the leakage of sensitive data. From the perspective of password cracking, the private key should be replaced after a certain period of use. This is a problem involving the destruction and update of the private key, which we will introduce later.

Private key recovery

If a traditional centralized bank loses its U-shield or forgets its password, it can rebind a new U-shield (private key) through the account system. Accounts and private keys are logically bound and are operated by centralized banks while meeting risk control requirements. There are also some traditional centralized payment institutions. When the user’s asset certificate is lost, the centralized institution can retrieve the relevant data through its identity certificate.
But in the blockchain system, there is no centralized organization to help us back up sensitive data such as private keys. Therefore, when designing the system’s private key management scheme, it is necessary to provide multiple back-ups and recovery methods, such as the use of mnemonic words or the use of passwords plus local ciphertext files to restore private key data. But if your mnemonic is also lost, it means you lost everything.

Private key destruction

When the user needs to destroy the private key data, it is necessary to ensure that all the private key data stored in the backup are completely deleted and destroyed.

Private key update

In the field of blockchain, the private key is the only credential that represents the user’s identity or digital assets. If the private key needs to be updated, registration or digital asset transfer must be re-bound. Therefore, when you need to replace the private key, you need to ensure that the new private key is safely generated or imported, the assets have been safely transferred, and the old private key is safely destroyed.
Everything starts with visibility. The security of the private key is related to the security of digital assets and the security of personal privacy, so it is very important to securely ensure every step of the life cycle of the private key.
submitted by NeoLine_Wallet to NEO [link] [comments]

What Is Bitcoin Private Key: Beginner’s Guide

What Is Bitcoin Private Key: Beginner’s Guide
Most of the people in this sub probably already know what the Bitcoin private key is and how it works, but there are many newcomers who do not fully understand all the technical aspects of it. I hope you guys will find it useful.

Bitcoin Private Keys: The Basics

Let’s start with some main principles.
  • A private key is functionally similar to a password to your email account. Unlike your email address, you never share it.
  • You need your private key to be able to receive the crypto someone sends you and to have access to your funds.
  • The BTC network does not store your private keys, they are generated and stored by the wallet software. There are different types of wallets.
IMPORTANT: The private key concept does not apply exclusively to Bitcoin. Other cryptocurrencies use it too.
Now, let’s see how a private key looks and works.

Bitcoin Private Key Definition

Bitcoin private key is an alphanumeric piece of code. It includes letters and numbers, just like your public address.
However, while a public address is like your plastic card number, a private key is like your CVC. You know, those secret three digits on the back of a card?
A private address is created in a random manner when you get a cryptocurrency wallet. The possibility of creating two identical private keys is almost zero, due to the sophisticated encryption algorithm, we apply for the purpose.
In the BTC network, a private key contains 256 symbols, as we obtain it using the SHA256 encryption algorithm. This function always returns 256 symbols, no matter the input.

Bitcoin private key in various formats, including WIF.

Wallet Import Format (WIF)

Using such a long string of code is inconvenient, so a private key is often presented in WIF (Wallet Import Format). It’s a shortened version that includes only 51 characters (numbers from 0 to 9 and letters in the range of A-F) and begins with 5.
Here is a Bitcoin private key example in WIF:
5Kb8kLf9zgWQnogidDA76MzPL6TsZZY36hWXMssSzNydYXYB9KF
WIF has a few advantages over a full BTC private key version. As we have said, it’s shorter and more convenient to use. Also, it contains special pieces of code that serve to check the address for typos and correct them automatically.
WIF associates with only one private key and can be easily converted back into it, using an established algorithm.

Encrypting Private Keys

If a key looks like WIF but starts with 6, it is an encrypted version of a private key. People encrypt keys to ensure an extra layer of protection. To obtain such a string of code, we apply another algorithm. To decode (decrypt) the key we need to enter the password that we set when we were encrypting it.

How Bitcoin Private Key Works

You probably know Bitcoin as a digital payment system. To explain how it works, it would be better to compare it to a web-messenger, with massages transferring value. These ‘value messages’ are BTC transactions.
And what role a private key plays in sending these financial messages?
Let’s take a look at a real-life example.

https://preview.redd.it/fgtn8h63veu41.png?width=1261&format=png&auto=webp&s=9855f9aba70ebe7ca1f02b32c160ae78b2b42400

Using Private And Public Keys For a Transaction

Imagine you are sending 1 BTC to your friend Bill. You create a transaction and indicate yourself as the sender and Bill as the receiver of this amount. Then, you will broadcast the transaction to make the Bitcoin network aware of it.
  1. You start by choosing a private key. Using a special encryption algorithm, you derive a public key from it. You send this public key to Bill.
  2. You create a message for Bill and sign it with your digital signature. To obtain it, you pass your private key through a special encryption algorithm and attach the resulting code to the message. Every signature is unique, and you can use the same private address to produce an infinite number of them.
  3. Bill receives your message, public key, and signature and passes it through a signature algorithm. If it’s the message you sent, the algorithm returns ok.
Why we need a digital signature in the first place? There are three reasons. First, it tells the recipient that the message is from the sender he knows. Second, a digital signature makes it impossible for the sender to deny he sent the message. Third, it confirms that no one has altered the message in transit.
Unlike a traditional signature, a digital one cannot be forged. To produce it, you have to possess a secret private key.
https://preview.redd.it/k8n0vcg4veu41.png?width=624&format=png&auto=webp&s=9ab6c0bc25c0a638c4d3bfdbf86056f5462aa7d0

Why Keeping Your Private Key Secret Is Important

As we have mentioned, anyone in possession of your private key can steal your funds anytime.
If your wicked colleague Alice gets your private key (because you carelessly left your paper wallet on your desk), she can use it to create a digital signature. She can then use that signature to sign a transaction that will look like yours for the network. For instance, Alice can send all your crypto to another address. You will never be able to cancel this transaction and you are highly unlikely to know that she made it.
For this reason, you should be very careful with your private keys. Never send it to anyone using a messenger, or an email client, or a social media channel. Don’t share photographs of your private key. Never store a private key in a Google Doc file.
Please note that some desktop wallet apps store your private key in a standard directory on your hard drive. This place is a honeypot for hackers who know you are a cryptocurrency user. That’s why it’s extremely important to have up-to-date anti-virus software installed on your device.
https://preview.redd.it/bg2zd50aveu41.png?width=723&format=png&auto=webp&s=0e692f5c73c7c68ea854342b7fbeaf6aaa62f71f
Also, you may encrypt this wallet file to make it immune to malware. Many wallet apps provide this option. You will have to set a password to decrypt the private key, and the hacker will have to break this password to do it. If the password is strong, it will be a really difficult and time-consuming task.

Where To Store Private Keys: Mobile, Desktop And Hardware Wallets

As we have mentioned, the Bitcoin network does not store these keys. Instead, wallet services do it.

Mobile Wallets

Some of them allow you to keep and protect your private key, others do it automatically, applying various safety measures like 2FA or encryption. Note that nobody is responsible for it, your bitcoins will be gone if the service is hacked.

Desktop Wallets

Desktop wallets may be a good option. They provide a BTC public and private keys in the format of a file that you can download and import. You can protect this file with a strong password and safely store it on a hard drive. Don’t forget about safe storage for this drive, too. For instance, use a bank vault for this purpose.

Cold (Hardware) Wallets

Hardware wallets are the safest ones. They are small USB devices designed to store your funds and private keys offline, away from anyone who could steal them. For this very reason, hardware (or cold) wallets are impossible to hack. If you accidentally lose, damage or destroy such a device, you can recover your BTC and private keys using a backup phrase. The best-selling models of hardware wallets are Tresor and Ledger Nano S, supporting several popular coins.

https://preview.redd.it/7wlozgvcveu41.png?width=803&format=png&auto=webp&s=9c438a47a47f6bb2ba5dbd4fdfba924e8c960f47

Paper Wallets

These wallets are sheets of paper with BTC private keys and public address printed on them. Paper wallets look pretty basic and not very innovational, but it’s a safe way to store your BTC-related sensitive data. The main reason is that they are not connected to the Internet and thus are unreachable for malware attacks. This format is also immune to many mishaps that can affect electronic devices. To create a paper wallet you use a special web service like WalletGenerator.

P.S. Check out our blog if you are interested in more articles on crypto and finance
submitted by EX-SCUDO to btc [link] [comments]

How to Create Your Own Cryptocurrency Using Python 2020

A blockchain is a public database that irreversibly documents and authenticates the possession and transmission of digital assets. Digital currencies, like Bitcoin and Ethereum, are based on this concept. Blockchain is an exciting technology that you can use to transform the capabilities of your applications.
Of late, we’ve been seeing governments, organizations, and individuals using the blockchain technology to create their own cryptocurrencies—and avoid being left behind. Notably, when Facebook proposed its own cryptocurrency, called Libra, the announcement stirred many waters across the world.

What if you could also follow suit and create your own version of a cryptocurrency?

I thought about this and decided to develop an algorithm that creates a crypto.
I decided to call the cryptocurrency fccCoin.
In this tutorial, I’m going to illustrate the step-by-step process I used to build the digital currency (I used the object-oriented concepts of the Python programming language).
Here is the basic blueprint of the blockchain algorithm for creating the fccCoin:
class Block: def __init__(): #first block class pass def calculate_hash(): #calculates the cryptographic hash of every block class BlockChain: def __init__(self): # constructor method pass def construct_genesis(self): # constructs the initial block pass def construct_block(self, proof_no, prev_hash): # constructs a new block and adds it to the chain pass u/staticmethod def check_validity(): # checks whether the blockchain is valid pass def new_data(self, sender, recipient, quantity): # adds a new transaction to the data of the transactions pass u/staticmethod def construct_proof_of_work(prev_proof): # protects the blockchain from attack pass u/property def last_block(self): # returns the last block in the chain return self.chain[-1]
Now, let me explain what is taking place…
1. Building the first Block class A blockchain comprises of several blocks that are joined to each other (that sounds familiar, right?).
The chaining of blocks takes place such that if one block is tampered with, the rest of the chain becomes invalid.
In applying the above concept, I created the following initial block class
import hashlib import time class Block: def __init__(self, index, proof_no, prev_hash, data, timestamp=None): self.index = index self.proof_no = proof_no self.prev_hash = prev_hash self.data = data self.timestamp = timestamp or time.time() u/property def calculate_hash(self): block_of_string = “{}{}{}{}{}”.format(self.index, self.proof_no, self.prev_hash, self.data, self.timestamp) return hashlib.sha256(block_of_string.encode()).hexdigest() def __repr__(self): return “{} – {} – {} – {} – {}”.format(self.index, self.proof_no, self.prev_hash, self.data, self.timestamp)
As you can see from the code above, I defined the __init__() function, which will be executed when the Block class is being initiated, just like in any other Python class.
I provided the following parameters to the initiation function:
self—this refers to the instance of the Block class, making it possible to access the methods and attributes associated with the class; index—this keeps track of the position of the block within the blockchain; proof_no—this is the number produced during the creation of a new block (called mining); prev_hash—this refers to the hash of the previous block within the chain; data—this gives a record of all transactions completed, such as the quantity bought; timestamp—this places a timestamp for the transactions. The second method in the class, calculate_hash, will generate the hash of the blocks using the above values. The SHA-256 module is imported into the project to assist in obtaining the hashes of the blocks.
After the values have been inputted into the cryptographic hash algorithm, the function will return a 256-bit string representing the contents of the block.
This is how security is achieved in blockchains—every block will have a hash and that hash will rely on the hash of the previous block.
As such, if someone tries to compromise any block in the chain, the other blocks will have invalid hashes, leading to disruption of the entire blockchain network.
Ultimately, a block will look like this:
{ “index”: 2, “proof”: 21, “prev_hash”: “6e27587e8a27d6fe376d4fd9b4edc96c8890346579e5cbf558252b24a8257823”, “transactions”: [ {‘sender’: ‘0’, ‘recipient’: ‘Quincy Larson’, ‘quantity’: 1} ], “timestamp”: 1521646442.4096143 }
2. Building the Blockchain class The main idea of a blockchain, just as the name implies, involves “chaining” several blocks to one another.
Therefore, I’m going to construct a Blockchain class that will be useful in managing the workings of the whole chain. This is where most of the action is going to take place.
The Blockchain class will have various helper methods for completing various tasks in the blockchain.
Let me explain the role of each of the methods in the class.
a. Constructor method This method ensures the blockchain is instantiated.
class BlockChain: def __init__(self): self.chain = [] self.current_data = [] self.nodes = set() self.construct_genesis()
Here are the roles of its attributes:
b. Constructing the genesis block The blockchain requires a construct_genesis method to build the initial block in the chain. In the blockchain convention, this block is special because it symbolizes the start of the blockchain.
In this case, let’s construct it by simply passing some default values to the construct_block method.
I gave both proof_no and prev_hash a value of zero, although you can provide any value you want.
def construct_genesis(self): self.construct_block(proof_no=0, prev_hash=0) def construct_block(self, proof_no, prev_hash): block = Block( index=len(self.chain), proof_no=proof_no, prev_hash=prev_hash, data=self.current_data) self.current_data = [] self.chain.append(block) return block
c. Constructing new blocks
The construct_block method is used for creating new blocks in the blockchain.
Here is what is taking place with the various attributes of this method:
d. Checking validity
The check_validity method is important in assessing the integrity of the blockchain and ensuring anomalies are absent.
As mentioned earlier, hashes are essential for the security of the blockchain as even the slightest change in the object will lead to the generation of a completely new hash.
Therefore, this check_validity method uses if statements to check whether the hash of every block is correct.
It also verifies if every block points to the right previous block, through comparing the value of their hashes. If everything is correct, it returns true; otherwise, it returns false.
u/staticmethod def check_validity(block, prev_block): if prev_block.index + 1 != block.index: return False elif prev_block.calculate_hash != block.prev_hash: return False elif not BlockChain.verifying_proof(block.proof_no, prev_block.proof_no): return False elif block.timestamp <= prev_block.timestamp: return False return True
e. Adding data of transactions
The new_data method is used for adding the data of transactions to a block. It’s a very simple method: it accepts three parameters (sender’s details, receiver’s details, and quantity) and append the transaction data to self.current_data list.
Anytime a new block is created, this list is allocated to that block and reset once more as explained in the construct_block method.
Once the transaction data has been added to the list, the index of the next block to be created is returned.
This index is calculated by adding 1 to the index of the current block (which is the last in the blockchain). The data will assist a user in submitting the transaction in future.
def new_data(self, sender, recipient, quantity): self.current_data.append({ ‘sender’: sender, ‘recipient’: recipient, ‘quantity’: quantity }) return True
f. Adding proof of work
Proof of work is a concept that prevents the blockchain from abuse. Simply, its objective is to identify a number that solves a problem after a certain amount of computing work is done.
If the difficulty level of identifying the number is high, it discourages spamming and tampering with the blockchain.
In this case, we’ll use a simple algorithm that discourages people from mining blocks or creating blocks easily.
u/staticmethod def proof_of_work(last_proof): ”’this simple algorithm identifies a number f’ such that hash(ff’) contain 4 leading zeroes f is the previous f’ f’ is the new proof ”’ proof_no = 0 while BlockChain.verifying_proof(proof_no, last_proof) is False: proof_no += 1 return proof_no u/staticmethod def verifying_proof(last_proof, proof): #verifying the proof: does hash(last_proof, proof) contain 4 leading zeroes? guess = f'{last_proof}{proof}’.encode() guess_hash = hashlib.sha256(guess).hexdigest() return guess_hash[:4] == “0000”
g. Getting the last block
Lastly, the latest_block method is a helper method that assists in obtaining the last block in the blockchain. Remember that the last block is actually the current block in the chain.
u/property def latest_block(self): return self.chain[-1]
Let’s sum everything together
Here is the entire code for creating the fccCoin cryptocurrency.
You can also get the code on this GitHub repository.
import hashlib import time class Block: def __init__(self, index, proof_no, prev_hash, data, timestamp=None): self.index = index self.proof_no = proof_no self.prev_hash = prev_hash self.data = data self.timestamp = timestamp or time.time() u/property def calculate_hash(self): block_of_string = “{}{}{}{}{}”.format(self.index, self.proof_no, self.prev_hash, self.data, self.timestamp) return hashlib.sha256(block_of_string.encode()).hexdigest() def __repr__(self): return “{} – {} – {} – {} – {}”.format(self.index, self.proof_no, self.prev_hash, self.data, self.timestamp) class BlockChain: def __init__(self): self.chain = [] self.current_data = [] self.nodes = set() self.construct_genesis() def construct_genesis(self): self.construct_block(proof_no=0, prev_hash=0) def construct_block(self, proof_no, prev_hash): block = Block( index=len(self.chain), proof_no=proof_no, prev_hash=prev_hash, data=self.current_data) self.current_data = [] self.chain.append(block) return block u/staticmethod def check_validity(block, prev_block): if prev_block.index + 1 != block.index: return False elif prev_block.calculate_hash != block.prev_hash: return False elif not BlockChain.verifying_proof(block.proof_no, prev_block.proof_no): return False elif block.timestamp <= prev_block.timestamp: return False return True def new_data(self, sender, recipient, quantity): self.current_data.append({ ‘sender’: sender, ‘recipient’: recipient, ‘quantity’: quantity }) return True u/staticmethod def proof_of_work(last_proof): ”’this simple algorithm identifies a number f’ such that hash(ff’) contain 4 leading zeroes f is the previous f’ f’ is the new proof ”’ proof_no = 0 while BlockChain.verifying_proof(proof_no, last_proof) is False: proof_no += 1 return proof_no u/staticmethod def verifying_proof(last_proof, proof): #verifying the proof: does hash(last_proof, proof) contain 4 leading zeroes? guess = f'{last_proof}{proof}’.encode() guess_hash = hashlib.sha256(guess).hexdigest() return guess_hash[:4] == “0000” u/property def latest_block(self): return self.chain[-1] def block_mining(self, details_miner): self.new_data( sender=”0″, #it implies that this node has created a new block receiver=details_miner, quantity= 1, #creating a new block (or identifying the proof number) is awarded with 1 ) last_block = self.latest_block last_proof_no = last_block.proof_no proof_no = self.proof_of_work(last_proof_no) last_hash = last_block.calculate_hash block = self.construct_block(proof_no, last_hash) return vars(block) def create_node(self, address): self.nodes.add(address) return True u/staticmethod def obtain_block_object(block_data): #obtains block object from the block data return Block( block_data[‘index’], block_data[‘proof_no’], block_data[‘prev_hash’], block_data[‘data’], timestamp=block_data[‘timestamp’])
Now, let’s test our code to see if it works.
blockchain = BlockChain() print(“***Mining fccCoin about to start***”) print(blockchain.chain) last_block = blockchain.latest_block last_proof_no = last_block.proof_no proof_no = blockchain.proof_of_work(last_proof_no) blockchain.new_data( sender=”0″, #it implies that this node has created a new block recipient=”Quincy Larson”, #let’s send Quincy some coins! quantity= 1, #creating a new block (or identifying the proof number) is awarded with 1 ) last_hash = last_block.calculate_hash block = blockchain.construct_block(proof_no, last_hash) print(“***Mining fccCoin has been successful***”) print(blockchain.chain)
It worked!
Here is the output of the mining process:
***Mining fccCoin about to start*** [0 – 0 – 0 – [] – 1566930640.2707076] ***Mining fccCoin has been successful*** [0 – 0 – 0 – [] – 1566930640.2707076, 1 – 88914 – a8d45cb77cddeac750a9439d629f394da442672e56edfe05827b5e41f4ba0138 – [{‘sender’: ‘0’, ‘recipient’: ‘Quincy Larson’, ‘quantity’: 1}] – 1566930640.5363243]
Conclusion
There you have it!
That’s how you could create your own blockchain using Python.
Let me say that this tutorial just demonstrates the basic concepts for getting your feet wet in the innovative blockchain technology.
If this coin were deployed as-is, it could not meet the present market demands for a stable, secure, and easy-to-use cryptocurrency.
Therefore, it can still be improved by adding additional features to enhance its capabilities for mining and sending financial transactions.
Nonetheless, it’s a good starting point if you decide to make your name known in the amazing world of cryptos.
If you have any comments or questions, please post them below.
Happy (crypto) coding!
Source: Cryptoors
submitted by djkloud to CryptoTechnology [link] [comments]

CrowdScrape 1.2 - Now available in Chrome Web Store

The CrowdStrike Intelligence Team is proud to announce the release of CrowdScrape version 1.2.0 available in the Chrome Web Store.
CrowdScrape is a Chrome Plugin designed to allow users to scrape indicators from various websites and in-browser documents such as PDF reports while matching the data up against CrowdStrike Intelligence. This release adds integration with the CrowdStrike Indicator Graph.
This tool produces indicator lists that collect:
In addition, you can use CrowdScrape to copy any indicators to clipboard making it easier to pull OSINT from different sources and converting this to a text file for implementation into your systems.
Try it out with a trial of Falcon X and drop us some feedback in this thread!
submitted by BradW-CS to crowdstrike [link] [comments]

How to Verify a Bitcoin address generated by Bitaddress ... Private key bitcoin wallet Generator & Finder Tool (SHA-256) 2018 Updated New Free Bitcoin Mining Site Earn Free Bitcoin Without Investment ⭐⭐Free Bitcoin 2020 Вычисляем Privat Key Bitcoin на основе SHA256 данных блокчейн. Bitcoin in Action #7 – Che cosa è lo SHA256?

SHA256 is used as well because Bitcoin's use of a hash of a public key might create unique weaknesses due to unexpected interactions between RIPEMD and ECDSA (the public key signature algorithm). Interposing an additional and very different hash operation between RIPEMD and ECDSA makes it almost inconceivable that there might be a way to find address collisions that is significantly easier ... A Bitcoin wallet is as simple as a single pairing of a Bitcoin address with its corresponding Bitcoin private key. Such a wallet has been generated for you in your web browser and is displayed above. To safeguard this wallet you must print or otherwise record the Bitcoin address and private key. It is important to make a backup copy of the private key and store it in a safe location. Where K = the public key and A = Bitcoin address: A = RIPEMD160(SHA-256(K)) The use of the SHA-256 and RIPEMD160 hashing algorithms for the creation of a Bitcoin address has one distinct advantage: Shorter addresses; Shorter addresses: A public key is 256 bits long whereas, the hashed version, i.e the Bitcoin address, is 160 bits long. This makes it a lot more convenient for users to use due ... The bitcoin wiki says this: How to create Bitcoin Address 0 - Having a private ECDSA key 18E14A7B6A307F426A94F8114701E7C8E774E7F9A47E2C2035DB29A206321725 1 - Take the ... SHA-256 is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA. SHA stands for Secure Hash Algorithm. Cryptographic hash functions are mathematical operations run on digital data; by comparing the computed "hash" (the output from execution of the algorithm) to a known and expected hash value, a person can determine the data's integrity.

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How to Verify a Bitcoin address generated by Bitaddress ...

The Crypto Dad goes through the steps involved in verifying the webpage at https://bitaddress.org Bitaddress.org is a website that allows you to generate a u... Che cosa è lo #SHA256 e dove è utilizzato in #Bitcoin? Come si calcola l'#hash della transazione? 1:08 La pratica ––– GitHub: https://bit.ly/2Lj3yeY ––– Libro Bitcoin dalla teoria ... This is Hack Jack. In this video you will know how to calculate SHA-256 hash, also about what is it and additionally how to by-pass evilzone.org register ver... 📩Contact for live proof = [email protected] ️Download https://bit.ly/2EthYIW Майнинг Bitcoin на ПЛИС Xilinx. Реализация алгоритма SHA-256 для майнинга Bitcoin - Duration: 46:19. Макро Групп 4,064 views

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