Change Bitcoin Core Data Directory - BitcoinWiki

Gridcoin 5.0.0.0-Mandatory "Fern" Release

https://github.com/gridcoin-community/Gridcoin-Research/releases/tag/5.0.0.0
Finally! After over ten months of development and testing, "Fern" has arrived! This is a whopper. 240 pull requests merged. Essentially a complete rewrite that was started with the scraper (the "neural net" rewrite) in "Denise" has now been completed. Practically the ENTIRE Gridcoin specific codebase resting on top of the vanilla Bitcoin/Peercoin/Blackcoin vanilla PoS code has been rewritten. This removes the team requirement at last (see below), although there are many other important improvements besides that.
Fern was a monumental undertaking. We had to encode all of the old rules active for the v10 block protocol in new code and ensure that the new code was 100% compatible. This had to be done in such a way as to clear out all of the old spaghetti and ring-fence it with tightly controlled class implementations. We then wrote an entirely new, simplified ruleset for research rewards and reengineered contracts (which includes beacon management, polls, and voting) using properly classed code. The fundamentals of Gridcoin with this release are now on a very sound and maintainable footing, and the developers believe the codebase as updated here will serve as the fundamental basis for Gridcoin's future roadmap.
We have been testing this for MONTHS on testnet in various stages. The v10 (legacy) compatibility code has been running on testnet continuously as it was developed to ensure compatibility with existing nodes. During the last few months, we have done two private testnet forks and then the full public testnet testing for v11 code (the new protocol which is what Fern implements). The developers have also been running non-staking "sentinel" nodes on mainnet with this code to verify that the consensus rules are problem-free for the legacy compatibility code on the broader mainnet. We believe this amount of testing is going to result in a smooth rollout.
Given the amount of changes in Fern, I am presenting TWO changelogs below. One is high level, which summarizes the most significant changes in the protocol. The second changelog is the detailed one in the usual format, and gives you an inkling of the size of this release.

Highlights

Protocol

Note that the protocol changes will not become active until we cross the hard-fork transition height to v11, which has been set at 2053000. Given current average block spacing, this should happen around October 4, about one month from now.
Note that to get all of the beacons in the network on the new protocol, we are requiring ALL beacons to be validated. A two week (14 day) grace period is provided by the code, starting at the time of the transition height, for people currently holding a beacon to validate the beacon and prevent it from expiring. That means that EVERY CRUNCHER must advertise and validate their beacon AFTER the v11 transition (around Oct 4th) and BEFORE October 18th (or more precisely, 14 days from the actual date of the v11 transition). If you do not advertise and validate your beacon by this time, your beacon will expire and you will stop earning research rewards until you advertise and validate a new beacon. This process has been made much easier by a brand new beacon "wizard" that helps manage beacon advertisements and renewals. Once a beacon has been validated and is a v11 protocol beacon, the normal 180 day expiration rules apply. Note, however, that the 180 day expiration on research rewards has been removed with the Fern update. This means that while your beacon might expire after 180 days, your earned research rewards will be retained and can be claimed by advertising a beacon with the same CPID and going through the validation process again. In other words, you do not lose any earned research rewards if you do not stake a block within 180 days and keep your beacon up-to-date.
The transition height is also when the team requirement will be relaxed for the network.

GUI

Besides the beacon wizard, there are a number of improvements to the GUI, including new UI transaction types (and icons) for staking the superblock, sidestake sends, beacon advertisement, voting, poll creation, and transactions with a message. The main screen has been revamped with a better summary section, and better status icons. Several changes under the hood have improved GUI performance. And finally, the diagnostics have been revamped.

Blockchain

The wallet sync speed has been DRASTICALLY improved. A decent machine with a good network connection should be able to sync the entire mainnet blockchain in less than 4 hours. A fast machine with a really fast network connection and a good SSD can do it in about 2.5 hours. One of our goals was to reduce or eliminate the reliance on snapshots for mainnet, and I think we have accomplished that goal with the new sync speed. We have also streamlined the in-memory structures for the blockchain which shaves some memory use.
There are so many goodies here it is hard to summarize them all.
I would like to thank all of the contributors to this release, but especially thank @cyrossignol, whose incredible contributions formed the backbone of this release. I would also like to pay special thanks to @barton2526, @caraka, and @Quezacoatl1, who tirelessly helped during the testing and polishing phase on testnet with testing and repeated builds for all architectures.
The developers are proud to present this release to the community and we believe this represents the starting point for a true renaissance for Gridcoin!

Summary Changelog

Accrual

Changed

Most significantly, nodes calculate research rewards directly from the magnitudes in EACH superblock between stakes instead of using a two- or three- point average based on a CPID's current magnitude and the magnitude for the CPID when it last staked. For those long-timers in the community, this has been referred to as "Superblock Windows," and was first done in proof-of-concept form by @denravonska.

Removed

Beacons

Added

Changed

Removed

Unaltered

As a reminder:

Superblocks

Added

Changed

Removed

Voting

Added

Changed

Removed

Detailed Changelog

[5.0.0.0] 2020-09-03, mandatory, "Fern"

Added

Changed

Removed

Fixed

submitted by jamescowens to gridcoin [link] [comments]

PSA: Enable Tor as a simple way to make your node reachable.

Become one of the 10% of node operators that receive incoming connections.
Installing bitcoin core is easy, and with pruning it really isn't the space sink it is characterized as. Even a modest computer can complete the initial block download (IBD) and become a full node. But what some users (90%) find a bit more challenging, is how to become a listening node. Listening nodes are an important part of the network, and are simple enough to enable. I can think of 4 ways to do it:
  1. Operate on an OS and Network that support uPnP, allowing bitcoin to open the ports for you.
  2. Subscribe to a VPN that allows you to open ports through their service.
  3. Manually configure your OS and network to forward port 8333 and 18333.
  4. Run Tor and direct bitcoin to listen through it.
I'll discuss #4. Obviously #1 or #2 are easier, but require a VPN subscription or uPnP enabled HW. And if you live in a dorm or don't control the network, Tor may be the only free option available.
As a bit of background, bitcoin supports three networks that your node can listen on:
Obviously, the more you enable, the better, but here are the basic steps for Tor in broad strokes. If you have any questions post them here and I'll see if we can't help you out:
  1. Download, verify1 and install Gpg4win
  2. Download, verify2, install, and launch Tor Browser
  3. Download, verify3, install, and launch Bitcoin Core
  4. Launch and Admin command console in the directory containing tor.exe
  5. Install the Tor service: tor.exe --service install
  6. CD to service dir: cd %windir%\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming\tor
  7. Create and edit a file called torrc with the contents suggested below
  8. Restart tor: tor.exe --service stop && tor.exe --service start
  9. Record the hostname: type .\HiddenService\hostname as
  10. Add the bitcoin.conf options suggested below
  11. Restart the bitcoin-qt program
  12. (Optional) Activate the bitnodes crawler at https://bitnodes.io/nodes/-8333/
It may take a while for your node to show up on bitnodes. I've found the check button sometimes has trouble with onions. Of course you don't need to do it, but it can provide a simple way to check status once your on the list.

torrc file: (replace c:\windows with the proper path as needed)

```

Change to C:\Windows\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming

Log notice file \tor\service.log

Bridges may be needed if the Gov't shuts down Tor exit nodes. Get Bridges by

emailing [email protected] from Gmail (only) and uncomment as follows:

Bridge obfs4 : cert= iat-mode=

HiddenServiceDir \tor\HiddenService HiddenServiceVersion 2 HiddenServicePort 8333 127.0.0.1:8333 HiddenServicePort 18333 127.0.0.1:18333 ```

bitcoin.conf file: (entries to be ADDED)

```

Change to what you recorded earlier

onion=127.0.0.1:9050 listen=1 externalip= discover=1 ```
Footnotes:
  • 1 Cert: {Subject: Intevation GmbH; SHA1: c13a65963ad53e78694dd223d518007791a05fe4}
  • 2 PGP Signing Key: 0xEF6E286DDA85EA2A4BA7DE684E2C6E8793298290
  • 3 PGP Signing Key: 0x01EA5486DE18A882D4C2684590C8019E36C2E964
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Tor

Subject: PSA: Make your node reachable by using Tor
There is usually a post every few months with someone asking for tips on how to make their node reachable. It's always a hard question to answer since its impossible to know what type of routers and firewalls they are going to have to punch through. This is especially difficult in college dorms. One cheap (and easy) way around it is to to just jump through a few extra steps to make your bitcoin node a bitcoin onion node. Tor is great about traversing routers and firewalls like a hot knife through butter.
  1. Download, verify1, install and initialize Gpg4win
  2. Download, verify2, install, and launch Tor Browser
  3. Download, verify3, install, and launch Bitcoin Core
  4. Launch an Admin command console in the directory with tor.exe
  5. Install the Tor service: tor.exe --service install
  6. CD to service dir: cd %windir%\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming\tor
  7. Create and edit a file called torrc with the contents suggested below
  8. Restart tor: tor --service stop && tor --service start
  9. Record your onion hostname: type .\HiddenService\hostname as
  10. Add the bitcoin.conf options suggested below
  11. Restart the bitcoin-qt program
  12. Verify node connectivity at https://bitnodes.io/nodes/-8333/

torrc file: (replace c:\windows with the proper path as needed)

```

Change to C:\Windows\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming

Log notice file \tor\service.log HiddenServiceDir \tor\HiddenService HiddenServiceVersion 2 HiddenServicePort 8333 127.0.0.1:8333 HiddenServicePort 18333 127.0.0.1:18333 ```

bitcoin.conf file: (entries to be ADDED)

```

Change to what you recorded earlier

onion=127.0.0.1:9050 listen=1 externalip= discover=1 ```
Footnotes:
  • 1 - Cert-Subject: "Intevation GmbH"  ;  Cert-SHA1: c13a65963ad53e78694dd223d518007791a05fe4
  • 2 - PGP Signing Key: 0xEF6E286DDA85EA2A4BA7DE684E2C6E8793298290
  • 3 - PGP Signing Key: 0x01EA5486DE18A882D4C2684590C8019E36C2E964
submitted by brianddk to brianddk [link] [comments]

Reddcoin (RDD) 02/20 Progress Report - Core Wallet v3.1 Evolution & PoSV v2 - Commits & More Commits to v3.1! (Bitcoin Core 0.10, MacOS Catalina, QT Enhanced Speed and Security and more!)

Reddcoin (RDD) Core Dev Team Informal Progress Report, Feb 2020 - As any blockchain or software expert will confirm, the hardest part of making successful progress in blockchain and crypto is invisible to most users. As developers, the Reddcoin Core team relies on internal experts like John Nash, contributors offering their own code improvements to our repos (which we would love to see more of!) and especially upstream commits from experts working on open source projects like Bitcoin itself. We'd like tothank each and everyone who's hard work has contributed to this progress.
As part of Reddcoin's evolution, and in order to include required security fixes, speed improvements that are long overdue, the team has up to this point incorporated the following code commits since our last v3.0.1 public release. In attempting to solve the relatively minor font display issue with MacOS Catalina, we uncovered a complicated interweaving of updates between Reddcoin Core, QT software, MacOS SDK, Bitcoin Core and related libraries and dependencies that mandated we take a holistic approach to both solve the Catalina display problem, but in doing so, prepare a more streamlined overall build and test system, allowing the team to roll out more frequent and more secure updates in the future. And also to include some badly needed fixes in the current version of Core, which we have tentatively labeled Reddcoin Core Wallet v3.1.
Note: As indicated below, v3.1 is NOT YET AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD BY PUBLIC. We wil advise when it is.
The new v3.1 version should be ready for internal QA and build testing by the end of this week, with luck, and will be turned over to the public shortly thereafter once testing has proven no unexpected issues have been introduced. We know the delay has been a bit extended for our ReddHead MacOS Catalina stakers, and we hope to have them all aboard soon. We have moved with all possible speed while attempting to incorproate all the required work, testing, and ensuring security and safety for our ReddHeads.
Which leads us to: PoSV v2 activation and the supermajority on Mainnet at the time of this writing has reached 5625/9000 blocks or 62.5%. We have progressed quite well and without any reported user issues since release, but we need all of the community to participate! This activation, much like the funding mechanisms currently being debated by BCH and others, and employed by DASH, will mean not only a catalyst for Reddcoin but ensure it's future by providing funding for the dev team. As a personal plea from the team, please help us support the PoSV v2 activation by staking your RDD, no matter how large or small your amount of stake.
Every block and every RDD counts, and if you don't know how, we'll teach you! Live chat is fun as well as providing tech support you can trust from devs and community ReddHead members. Join us today in staking and online and collect some RDD "rain" from users and devs alike!
If you're holding Reddcoin and not staking, or you haven't upgraded your v2.x wallet to v3.0.1 (current release), we need you to help achieve consensus and activate PoSV v2! For details, see the pinned message here or our website or medium channel. Upgrade is simple and takes moments; if you're nervous or unsure, we're here to help live in Telegram or Discord, as well as other chat programs. See our website for links.
Look for more updates shortly as our long-anticipated Reddcoin Payment Gateway and Merchant Services API come online with point-of-sale support, as we announce the cross-crypto-project Aussie firefighter fundraiser program, as well as a comprehensive update to our development roadmap and more.
Work has restarted on ReddID and multiple initiatives are underway to begin educating and sharing information about ReddID, what it is, and how to use it, as we approach a releasable ReddID product. We enthusiastically encourage anyone interested in working to bring these efforts to life, whether writers, UX/UI experts, big data analysts, graphic artists, coders, front-end, back-end, AI, DevOps, the Reddcoin Core dev team is growing, and there's more opportunity and work than ever!
Bring your talents to a community and dev team that truly appreciates it, and share the Reddcoin Love!
And now, lots of commits. As v3.1 is not yet quite ready for public release, these commits have not been pushed publicly, but in the interests of sharing progress transparently, and including our ReddHead community in the process, see below for mind-numbing technical detail of work accomplished.
e5c143404 - - 2014-08-07 - Ross Nicoll - Changed LevelDB cursors to use scoped pointers to ensure destruction when going out of scope. *99a7dba2e - - 2014-08-15 - Cory Fields - tests: fix test-runner for osx. Closes ##4708 *8c667f1be - - 2014-08-15 - Cory Fields - build: add funcs.mk to the list of meta-depends *bcc1b2b2f - - 2014-08-15 - Cory Fields - depends: fix shasum on osx < 10.9 *54dac77d1 - - 2014-08-18 - Cory Fields - build: add option for reducing exports (v2) *6fb9611c0 - - 2014-08-16 - randy-waterhouse - build : fix CPPFLAGS for libbitcoin_cli *9958cc923 - - 2014-08-16 - randy-waterhouse - build: Add --with-utils (bitcoin-cli and bitcoin-tx, default=yes). Help string consistency tweaks. Target sanity check fix. *342aa98ea - - 2014-08-07 - Cory Fields - build: fix automake warnings about the use of INCLUDES *46db8ad51 - - 2020-02-18 - John Nash - build: add build.h to the correct target *a24de1e4c - - 2014-11-26 - Pavel Janík - Use complete path to include bitcoin-config.h. *fd8f506e5 - - 2014-08-04 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - qt: Demote ReportInvalidCertificate message to qDebug *f12aaf3b1 - - 2020-02-17 - John Nash - build: QT5 compiled with fPIC require fPIC to be enabled, fPIE is not enough *7a991b37e - - 2014-08-12 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - build: check for sys/prctl.h in the proper way *2cfa63a48 - - 2014-08-11 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - build: Add mention of --disable-wallet to bdb48 error messages *9aa580f04 - - 2014-07-23 - Cory Fields - depends: add shared dependency builder *8853d4645 - - 2014-08-08 - Philip Kaufmann - [Qt] move SubstituteFonts() above ToolTipToRichTextFilter *0c98e21db - - 2014-08-02 - Ross Nicoll - URLs containing a / after the address no longer cause parsing errors. *7baa77731 - - 2014-08-07 - ntrgn - Fixes ignored qt 4.8 codecs path on windows when configuring with --with-qt-libdir *2a3df4617 - - 2014-08-06 - Cory Fields - qt: fix unicode character display on osx when building with 10.7 sdk *71a36303d - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: fix race in 'make deploy' for windows *077295498 - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: Fix 'make deploy' when binaries haven't been built yet *ffdcc4d7d - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: hook up qt translations for static osx packaging *25a7e9c90 - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: add --with-qt-translationdir to configure for use with static qt *11cfcef37 - - 2014-08-04 - Cory Fields - build: teach macdeploy the -translations-dir argument, for use with static qt *4c4ae35b1 - - 2014-07-23 - Cory Fields - build: Find the proper xcb/pcre dependencies *942e77dd2 - - 2014-08-06 - Cory Fields - build: silence mingw fpic warning spew *e73e2b834 - - 2014-06-27 - Huang Le - Use async name resolving to improve net thread responsiveness *c88e76e8e - - 2014-07-23 - Cory Fields - build: don't let libtool insert rpath into binaries *18e14e11c - - 2014-08-05 - ntrgn - build: Fix windows configure when using --with-qt-libdir *bb92d65c4 - - 2014-07-31 - Cory Fields - test: don't let the port number exceed the legal range *62b95290a - - 2014-06-18 - Cory Fields - test: redirect comparison tool output to stdout *cefe447e9 - - 2014-07-22 - Cory Fields - gitian: remove unneeded option after last commit *9347402ca - - 2014-07-21 - Cory Fields - build: fix broken boost chrono check on some platforms *c9ed039cf - - 2014-06-03 - Cory Fields - build: fix whitespace in pkg-config variable *3bcc5ad37 - - 2014-06-03 - Cory Fields - build: allow linux and osx to build against static qt5 *01a44ba90 - - 2014-07-17 - Cory Fields - build: silence false errors during make clean *d1fbf7ba2 - - 2014-07-08 - Cory Fields - build: fix win32 static linking after libtool merge *005ae2fa4 - - 2014-07-08 - Cory Fields - build: re-add AM_LDFLAGS where it's overridden *37043076d - - 2014-07-02 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - Fix the Qt5 build after d95ba75 *f3b4bbf40 - - 2014-07-01 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - qt: Change serious messages from qDebug to qWarning *f4706f753 - - 2014-07-01 - Wladimir J. van der Laan - qt: Log messages with type>QtDebugMsg as non-debug *98e85fa1f - - 2014-06-06 - Pieter Wuille - libsecp256k1 integration *5f1f2e226 - - 2020-02-17 - John Nash - Merge branch 'switch_verification_code' into Build *1f30416c9 - - 2014-02-07 - Pieter Wuille - Also switch the (unused) verification code to low-s instead of even-s. *1c093d55e - - 2014-06-06 - Cory Fields - secp256k1: Add build-side changes for libsecp256k1 *7f3114484 - - 2014-06-06 - Cory Fields - secp256k1: add libtool as a dependency *2531f9299 - - 2020-02-17 - John Nash - Move network-time related functions to timedata.cpp/h *d003e4c57 - - 2020-02-16 - John Nash - build: fix build weirdness after 54372482. *7035f5034 - - 2020-02-16 - John Nash - Add ::OUTPUT_SIZE *2a864c4d8 - - 2014-06-09 - Cory Fields - crypto: create a separate lib for crypto functions *03a4e4c70 - - 2014-06-09 - Cory Fields - crypto: explicitly check for byte read/write functions *a78462a2a - - 2014-06-09 - Cory Fields - build: move bitcoin-config.h to its own directory *a885721c4 - - 2014-05-31 - Pieter Wuille - Extend and move all crypto tests to crypto_tests.cpp *5f308f528 - - 2014-05-03 - Pieter Wuille - Move {Read,Write}{LE,BE}{32,64} to common.h and use builtins if possible *0161cc426 - - 2014-05-01 - Pieter Wuille - Add built-in RIPEMD-160 implementation *deefc27c0 - - 2014-04-28 - Pieter Wuille - Move crypto implementations to src/crypto/ *d6a12182b - - 2014-04-28 - Pieter Wuille - Add built-in SHA-1 implementation. *c3c4f9f2e - - 2014-04-27 - Pieter Wuille - Switch miner.cpp to use sha2 instead of OpenSSL. *b6ed6def9 - - 2014-04-28 - Pieter Wuille - Remove getwork() RPC call *0a09c1c60 - - 2014-04-26 - Pieter Wuille - Switch script.cpp and hash.cpp to use sha2.cpp instead of OpenSSL. *8ed091692 - - 2014-04-20 - Pieter Wuille - Add a built-in SHA256/SHA512 implementation. *0c4c99b3f - - 2014-06-21 - Philip Kaufmann - small cleanup in src/compat .h and .cpp *ab1369745 - - 2014-06-13 - Cory Fields - sanity: hook up sanity checks *f598c67e0 - - 2014-06-13 - Cory Fields - sanity: add libc/stdlib sanity checks *b241b3e13 - - 2014-06-13 - Cory Fields - sanity: autoconf check for sys/select.h *cad980a4f - - 2019-07-03 - John Nash - build: Add a top-level forwarding target for src/ objects *f4533ee1c - - 2019-07-03 - John Nash - build: qt: split locale resources. Fixes non-deterministic distcheck *4a0e46e76 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: fix version dependency *2f61699d9 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: quit abusing AMCPPFLAGS *99b60ba49 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: avoid the use of top and abs_ dir paths *c8f673d5d - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: Tidy up file generation output *5318bce57 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: nuke Makefile.include from orbit *672a25349 - - 2019-06-29 - John Nash - build: add stub makefiles for easier subdir builds *562b7c5a6 - - 2020-02-08 - John Nash - build: delete old Makefile.am's *066120079 - - 2020-02-08 - John Nash - build: Switch to non-recursive make
Whew! No wonder it's taken the dev team a while! :)
TL;DR: Trying to fix MacOS Catalina font display led to requiring all kinds of work to migrate and evolve the Reddcoin Core software with Apple, Bitcoin and QT components. Lots of work done, v3.1 public release soon. Also other exciting things and ReddID back under active dev effort.
submitted by TechAdept to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

Dogecoin 1.5.1 Released - Upgrade Now!

We’re happy to announce the release of Dogecoin version 1.5.1!
This release incorporates a range of updates from community contributors, some much needed bug fixes, plus some cool treats brought down-stream from the recent Bitcoin 0.9 release candidate.
Thanks to everyone who helped make this release possible, the entire community appreciates it. We recommend all users update to the latest version and please report any issues you may encounter. As always, backup your wallet.dat file before updating (just to be safe).
Downloads: Windows Installer Windows Archive Mac OS X App
Release highlights: - Switched to Boost 1.55 to fix network connectivity issues on Windows - Removal of reliance on IRC for discovering nodes - Support for URL protocol, eg. dogecoin:addr?amount=xxx&(see Bitcoin’s implementation) - Ability to automatically look up transactions on Dogechain from your client - Working Windows setup script and installer - Opt-in debug logging via -debuglog (to save disk space and stop constant writing) - Fixed Mac Splashscreen’s greedy desktop behavior - Reimplemented testnet, fixing RPC crash due to no genesis block being present - Allow user to load any wallet from data directory specified using -wallet=mywallet.dat - Updated to LevelDB 1.15 to address blockchain database corruption issues - Allow user to send change only to specified address(es) using -change= (one -change parameter per address) - Fixed RPC difficulty look up
Troubleshooting
If anyone experiences issues, delete all 1.4 data (apart from your backed up wallet.dat file) and do a fresh 1.5.1 install.
Enjoy!
submitted by Laika1954 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

A Guide to Keeping Keys Offline Using Armory +rPi

Hi Redditors.
I am going to post in this thread my experiences in getting my Desktop (Debian) machine running Armory in watch-only mode, and coupling that with an offline Raspberry Pi (which holds my private keys) for signing the transactions previously made in watch-only mode.
I actually compiled Armory from source directly on my Pi. This guide is probably more for the bitcoin 'power user', as to run Armory online, and broadcast the signed transactions, you need to have a bitcoin full node running (bitcoind).
Basic requirements:
Aimed-for Setup:
I'll post the guide in digestible sections...

Section 1

I should begin by saying I installed source code from git, and got Armory to build the DB on my desktop initially, WITHOUT creating a wallet.. (This allowed me to debug what was going on a little!)
Go to Bitcoin.org, select Armory..
It leads to a Download from Git:
https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory/releases
Followed the procedure for Linux Debian verify code, compile, install, all straight-forward..
Began by running bitcoind, and telling Armory where to find it. This is the command I used, obviously it was all on one line and didn't include the arrows/explanations!:
python ArmoryQt.py \ --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks \ # <-----(where my bitcoind blocks live) --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi \ # <-----(this is instead of ~/.armory) --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases # <-------(again, non std. place used for Armory's databases.. my choice.) 
So, on the Desktop, after the initial "build databases"
(NB the initial "Build Databases" took about 1.5h and my two CPUs were maxed the whole time, Temps up to 62C. Not ideal; Im not in a rush!)
I then wanted to import a watch-only wallet.
Before I did this, I took a full backup of the Armory data dir:
/ArmoryDataDi
(or ~/.armory in a default installation).
I'd hate to have to make Armory do another full sync with the bitcoind node!

Section 2

Next step: offline wallet (with Private Keys) is on a Raspberry Pi.
I downloaded the source and managed to compile it on the pi itself! :)
Though there were some gymnastics needed to setup the Pi.
My Pi is running Raspbian based on Wheezy.. quite old!
I did the following on the Pi:
apt-get update apt-get upgrade (<---took about an hour!) apt-get install autotools-dev apt-get install autoconf 
Then I followed the instructions exactly as I had done for my Debian Desktop machine, EXCEPT:
I had to increase the Pi's swap space. I upped it from 100Mb to 400Mb.
The compilation took 7 hours, and my poor SD card got a thrashing.
But after compilation, I put the Swap back to 100Mb and Armory runs ok with about 150Mb of memory (no swap needed).
Swap increase on the Pi:
use your favourite editor, and open the file /etc/dphys-swapfile
add/change the following line:
CONF_SWAPSIZE=400 
Then, REBOOT the Pi:
sudo shutdown -h -P now 
Once the compilation was done on the Pi, put the swap back, rebooted and created an Armory wallet.
I added manual entropy and upped the encryption 'time' from 250ms to 2500ms - since the Pi is slow, but I'll be happy to wait for more iterations in the Key Derivation Function.
Once the wallet was created, it obviously prompts you for backup.
I want to add a private key of my own (i.e. import), so don't do the backup until this is over.
I import my Private Key, and Armory checks that this corresponds to a Public Key, which I check is correct.
This is the point now where the Pi storage medium (e.g an SD card) has to be properly destroyed if you ever get rid of it.
I had thought that now would be a good time to decide if your new wallet will generate Segwit receiving addresses, and also addresses used to receive 'change' after a transaction..
But it seems Armory WON'T let you switch to P2SH-P2WPKH unless your Armory is connected to a node offering "WITNESS" service.
Obviously, my Pi is offline and will never connect to a node, so the following will not work on the Pi:
NB: I thought about setting this on the Debian "watch-only" wallet, but that would surely mean doom, as the Pi would not know about those addresses and backups might not keep them.. who knows...
So, end result:- no segwit for me just yet in my offline funds.

--If anyone can offer a solution to this, I'd be very grateful--

Section 3

Ok, now this is a good point to back up your wallet on the Pi. It has your imported keys. I choose a Digital Backup - and put it on a USB key, which will never touch the internet and will be stored off-site. I also chose to encrypt it, because I'm good with passwords..
NB: The Armory paper backup will NOT back up your imported private keys, so keep those somewhere if you're not sweeping them. It would be prudent to have an Armory paper backup anyway, but remember it will likely NOT help you with that imported key.
Now for the watch-only copy of the wallet. I want to get the "watch-only" version onto my Desktop Debian machine.
On the Pi, I created (exported to a USB key) a "watching-only" copy of my wallet.
I would use the RECOMMENDED approach, export the "Entire Wallet File".
As you will see below, I initially exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key I entered manually above (i.e. the public Key!).
Now, back on the Debian Desktop machine...
I stopped all my crontab jobs; just give Armory uninterrupted CPU/memory/disk...
I also stopped bitcoind and made a backup prior to any watch-only wallet being imported.
I already made a backup of Armory on my Desktop, before any wallet import.
(this was needed, as I made a mistake.. see below)
So on the Debian Desktop machine, I begin by firing up bitcoind.
my command for this is:
./bitcoind -daemon -datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414 -dbcache=400 -maxmempool=400 

Section 4

I try running Armory like this:
(I'm actually starting Armory from a script - StartArm.sh)
Inside the script StartArm.sh, it has the line:
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage=4 --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
I know from bitter experience that doing a scan over the blockchain for a new wallet takes a looong time and a lot of CPU, and I'd like it to play nicely; not gobble all the memory and swap and run my 2xCPUs both at 100% for four hours...
So... I aim to run with --ram-usage=X and --thread-count=X
(For me in the end, X=1 but I began with X=4)
I began with --ram-usage=4 (<--- = 4x128Mb)
The result is below...
TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 
It didn't recognise the ram-usage and carried on, crippling my Debian desktop PC.
This is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up, and it can take over 30 minutes just to exit nicely from bitcoind and ArmoryDB.
So, I ssh to the machine from another computer, and keep an eye on it with the command
"free -h" 
I'd also be able to do a "sudo reboot now" if needed from here.

Section 5

So, trying to get my --ram-usage command recognised, I tried this line (added quotes):
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="4" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
But no, same error...
Loading Armory Engine: Armory Version: 0.96.4 Armory Build: None PyBtcWallet Version: 1.35 Detected Operating system: Linux OS Variant : ('debian', '9.4', '') User home-directory : /home/ Satoshi BTC directory : /BlockChain/chain20180414 Armory home dir : /ArmoryDataDi ArmoryDB directory : /ArmoryDataDidatabases Armory settings file : /ArmoryDataDiArmorySettings.txt Armory log file : /ArmoryDataDiarmorylog.txt Do wallet checking : True (ERROR) ArmoryUtils.py:3723 - Unsupported language specified. Defaulting to English (en) (ERROR) ArmoryQt.py:1833 - Failed to start Armory database: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects Traceback (most recent call last): File "ArmoryQt.py", line 1808, in startArmoryDBIfNecessary TheSDM.spawnDB(str(ARMORY_HOME_DIR), TheBDM.armoryDBDir) File "/BitcoinArmory/SDM.py", line 387, in spawnDB pargs.append('--ram-usage=' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 

Section 6

So, I edit the Armory python file SDM.py:
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=4') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =4 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) 
Running it, I now have acknowledgement of the --ram-usage=4:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=4 
Also, even with ram-usage=4, it used too much memory, so I told it to quit.
It took over 30 minutes to stop semi-nicely. The last thing it reported was:
ERROR - 00:25:21: (StringSockets.cpp:351) FcgiSocket::writeAndRead FcgiError: unexpected fcgi header version 
But that didn't seem to matter or corrupt the Armory Database, so I think it's ok.
So, I get brave and change SDM.py as below, and I make sure my script has a command line for --ram-usage="ABCDE" and --thread-count="FGHIJ"; the logic being that these strings "ABCDE" will pass the IF criteria below, and my hardcoded values will be used...
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) if ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT != -1 pargs.append('--thread-count=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 #' + ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT) 
So, as usual, I use my script and start this with: ./StartArm.sh
(which uses command line:)
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="ABCDE" --thread-count="FGHIJ" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
(this forces it to use my hard-coded values in SDM.py...)
So, this is the command which it reports that it starts with:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=1 --thread-count=1 
Again, this is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up. So I ssh to the machine and keep an eye on it with:
"free -h" 

Section 7

So, on the Debian Desktop PC, I inserted the USB stick with the watch-only wallet I exported from the Pi.
Start Armory...
Import "Entire Wallet File" watch-only copy.
Wait 4 hours..
YAY!!!
After running Armory for about 30m, the memory usage dropped by 400m... wierd...
It took ~2 hours to get 40% completion.
After 3.5 hours it's almost there...
The memory went up to about 1.7Gb in use and 900Mb of Swap, but the machine remained fairly responsive throughout, apart from a few (10?) periods at the start, where it appeared to freeze for 10-30s at a time.
(That's where my ssh session came in handy - I could check the machine was still ok with a "free -h" command)
Now, I can:
Create an unsigned transaction on my Desktop,
Save the tx to USB stick,
Move to the Pi,
Sign the tx,
Move back to the Desktop,
Broadcast the signed tx.

Section 8

My initial Mistake:
This caused me to have to roll-back my Armory database, using the backup. so you should try to avoid doing this..
On the Pi, I exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key
It is RECOMMENDED to use the Digital Export of Entire Wallet File from the Pi when making a watch-only copy. If you just export just the "ROOT data", not the "Entire Wallet File", you'll have problems if you used an imported Private Key in the offline wallet, like I did.
Using the ROOT data text import, after it finished... my balance was zero. So,. I tried a Help->Rescan Balance (Restart Armory, takes 1minute to get back up and running) No Luck. Still zero balance.
So, I try Rescan Databases.. This will take longer. Nah.. no luck.
So, I tried again, thinking it might be to do with the fact that I imported the text "root data" stuff, instead of following the (Recommended) export of watching-wallet file.
So, I used my Armory backup, and wound back the ArmoryDataDi to the point before the install of the (zero balance) wallet. (you should not need to do this, as you will hopefully use the RECOMMENDED approach of exporting the "Entire Wallet File"!)
submitted by fartinator to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Core 0.10.1 Released

Bitcoin Core version 0.10.1 is now available from:
https://bitcoin.org/bin/bitcoin-core-0.10.1/
This is a new minor version release, bringing bug fixes and translation updates. If you are using 0.10.0, it is recommended to upgrade to this version.
Please report bugs using the issue tracker at github:
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/issues

Upgrading and downgrading

How to Upgrade

If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer (on Windows) or just copy over /Applications/Bitcoin-Qt (on Mac) or bitcoind/bitcoin-qt (on Linux).

Downgrade warning

Because release 0.10.0 and later makes use of headers-first synchronization and parallel block download (see further), the block files and databases are not backwards-compatible with pre-0.10 versions of Bitcoin Core or other software:
If you want to be able to downgrade smoothly, make a backup of your entire data directory. Without this your node will need start syncing (or importing from bootstrap.dat) anew afterwards. It is possible that the data from a completely synchronised 0.10 node may be usable in older versions as-is, but this is not supported and may break as soon as the older version attempts to reindex.
This does not affect wallet forward or backward compatibility.

Notable changes

This is a minor release and hence there are no notable changes. For the notable changes in 0.10, refer to the release notes for the 0.10.0 release at https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/v0.10.0/doc/release-notes.md

0.10.1 Change log

Detailed release notes follow. This overview includes changes that affect external behavior, not code moves, refactors or string updates.
RPC:
Block (database) and transaction handling:
P2P protocol and network code:
Validation:
Build system:
Wallet:
GUI:
Tests:
Miscellaneous:

Credits

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this release:
As well as everyone that helped translating on Transifex.
submitted by harda to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to run a Bitcoin Cash full node properly?

I would like to run a Bitcoin Cash full node to support the network.
I've done the following steps:
My client seemed to be syncing without any issue until the first Bitcoin Cash block (478558). After this block the the synchronization stopped. I haven't modified the default "Bitcoin-Qt.conf" file. My client is connected currently to 8 other nodes (6xBitcoin ABC, 1xBUCash and 1xBitcoinUnlimited). The debug log is huge it is about 100MB. At the end of the log file there are few messages like this:
AcceptBlockHeader: block is marked invalid
or [Net] Id: 1434 0 => 100 Ban threshold exceeded
Any idea why is my client stuck at block 478558?
submitted by abokq to btc [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

errors with CMakelists

I'm trying to make it pass the cmake lists, I use msys2, windows 10, Qt creator 5 static minGW64. I get this:
Running Windows Runtime device detection. No winrtrunner.exe found. Running "C:\msys64\mingw64\bin\cmake.exe -E server "--pipe=\\.\pipe\{3ce861c4-799f-4cd3-ba7b-26e0ea59d410}" --experimental" in C:\Users\xxx\AppData\Local\Temp\QtCreator-OrxkPO\qtc-cmake-wOyWMGGN. Starting to parse CMake project, using: "-DCMAKE_CXX_COMPILER:STRING=C:/msys64/mingw64/bin/g++.exe", "-DCMAKE_C_COMPILER:STRING=C:/msys64/mingw64/bin/gcc.exe", "-DCMAKE_PREFIX_PATH:STRING=C:/msys64/mingw64/qt5-static", "-DPYTHON:FILEPATH=C:\msys64\mingw64\bin\python3.7.exe", "-DQT_QMAKE_EXECUTABLE:STRING=C:/msys64/mingw64/qt5-static/bin/qmake.exe", "-DSECP256K1_ENABLE_MODULE_ECDH:BOOL=ON". The C compiler identification is GNU 8.2.0 The CXX compiler identification is GNU 8.2.0 Check for working C compiler: C:/msys64/mingw64/bin/gcc.exe Check for working C compiler: C:/msys64/mingw64/bin/gcc.exe -- works Detecting C compiler ABI info Detecting C compiler ABI info - done Detecting C compile features Detecting C compile features - done Check for working CXX compiler: C:/msys64/mingw64/bin/g++.exe Check for working CXX compiler: C:/msys64/mingw64/bin/g++.exe -- works Detecting CXX compiler ABI info Detecting CXX compiler ABI info - done Detecting CXX compile features Detecting CXX compile features - done Performing Test FLAG_IS_SUPPORTED Performing Test FLAG_IS_SUPPORTED - Success Found OpenSSL: C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/libcrypto.dll.a (found version "1.1.1") Looking for include file endian.h Looking for include file endian.h - not found Looking for include file sys/endian.h Looking for include file sys/endian.h - not found Looking for include file byteswap.h Looking for include file byteswap.h - not found Looking for bswap_16 Looking for bswap_16 - not found Looking for bswap_32 Looking for bswap_32 - not found Looking for bswap_64 Looking for bswap_64 - not found Looking for include file sys/select.h Looking for include file sys/select.h - not found Looking for include file sys/prctl.h Looking for include file sys/prctl.h - not found Looking for __builtin_clz Looking for __builtin_clz - found Looking for __builtin_clzl Looking for __builtin_clzl - found Looking for __builtin_clzll Looking for __builtin_clzll - found Looking for M_ARENA_MAX Looking for M_ARENA_MAX - not found Looking for malloc_info Looking for malloc_info - not found Looking for strnlen Looking for strnlen - found Looking for daemon Looking for daemon - not found Looking for getentropy Looking for getentropy - not found Looking for getentropy Looking for getentropy - not found Performing Test HAVE_SYS_GETRANDOM Performing Test HAVE_SYS_GETRANDOM - Failed Performing Test HAVE_SYSCTL_ARND Performing Test HAVE_SYSCTL_ARND - Failed Looking for EVP_MD_CTX_new Looking for EVP_MD_CTX_new - found Check if the system is big endian Searching 16 bit integer Looking for sys/types.h Looking for sys/types.h - found Looking for stdint.h Looking for stdint.h - found Looking for stddef.h Looking for stddef.h - found Check size of unsigned short Check size of unsigned short - done Using unsigned short Check if the system is big endian - little endian Looking for unistd.h Looking for unistd.h - found Looking for crc32c_value in crc32c Looking for crc32c_value in crc32c - not found Looking for snappy_compress in snappy Looking for snappy_compress in snappy - not found Looking for malloc in tcmalloc Looking for malloc in tcmalloc - not found Looking for fdatasync Looking for fdatasync - not found Performing Test HAVE_CLANG_THREAD_SAFETY Performing Test HAVE_CLANG_THREAD_SAFETY - Failed Performing Test HAVE_CXX17_HAS_INCLUDE Performing Test HAVE_CXX17_HAS_INCLUDE - Success Looking for pthread.h Looking for pthread.h - found Looking for pthread_create Looking for pthread_create - found Found Threads: TRUE Looking for sqlite3_open in sqlite3 Looking for sqlite3_open in sqlite3 - found Performing Test HAVE_KYOTOCABINET Performing Test HAVE_KYOTOCABINET - Failed GMP libs: C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/libgmp.dll.a C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/libgmpxx.dll.a Found GMP: C:/msys64/mingw64/include Performing Test USE_ASM_X86_64 Performing Test USE_ASM_X86_64 - Success Check size of __int128 Check size of __int128 - done SHLWAPI lib: SHLWAPI_LIBRARY-NOTFOUND Could NOT find GMP (missing: SHLWAPI_INCLUDE_DIR SHLWAPI_LIBRARY) Boost version: 1.68.0 Found the following Boost libraries: chrono filesystem program_options thread system date_time atomic libevent: C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/libevent.dll.a Found Event: C:/msys64/mingw64/include Boost version: 1.68.0 Found the following Boost libraries: unit_test_framework Performing Test BOOST_TEST_DYN_LINK Performing Test BOOST_TEST_DYN_LINK - Failed BerkeleyDB libs: C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/libdb.a C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/libdb_cxx.a Found BerkeleyDB: C:/msys64/mingw64/include libevent: C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/libevent.dll.a ZeroMQ lib: C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/libzmq.dll.a Found ZeroMQ: C:/msys64/mingw64/include Found Protobuf: C:/msys64/mingw64/lib/libprotobuf.dll.a (found version "3.6.1") CMake Error: The following variables are used in this project, but they are set to NOTFOUND. Please set them or make sure they are set and tested correctly in the CMake files: C:/Users/xxx/Documents/CPP_programs/QtCreatobitcoin-abc1/src/SHLWAPI_INCLUDE_DIR used as include directory in directory C:/Users/xxx/Documents/CPP_programs/QtCreatobitcoin-abc1/src SHLWAPI_LIBRARY (ADVANCED) linked by target "util" in directory C:/Users/xxx/Documents/CPP_programs/QtCreatobitcoin-abc1/src WS2_32_LIBRARY linked by target "util" in directory C:/Users/xxx/Documents/CPP_programs/QtCreatobitcoin-abc1/src Configuring incomplete, errors occurred! See also "C:/Users/xxx/AppData/Local/Temp/QtCreator-OrxkPO/qtc-cmake-wOyWMGGN/CMakeFiles/CMakeOutput.log". See also "C:/Users/xxx/AppData/Local/Temp/QtCreator-OrxkPO/qtc-cmake-wOyWMGGN/CMakeFiles/CMakeError.log". CMake Project parsing failed. 
submitted by rdar1999 to BitcoinABC [link] [comments]

bitcoin-qt ready for use within half an hour … download an up-to-date pruned blockchain

Let us discuss how safe this is :-)
This tutorial is for Linux only but people using other operating systems will understand what to do.
Download the bitcoin blockchain
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B0nH34wIYOSlSG81ZUZUZGZjVkE?usp=sharing
This will download (~20 minutes) the 2485 MB file:
bitcoin_blockchain_pruned_550MB_19aug2016.tar.gz
It contains only blocks, no wallet or log files. It has been created with -prune=550
Unpack
tar -zxvf bitcoin_blockchain_pruned_550MB_19aug2016.tar.gz
and observe it contains only blocks and chain state data. This will create the directory:
.bitcoin_pruned_550MB_19aug2016
Let’s assume you move this to ~/.bitcoin_pruned, so
mv .bitcoin_pruned_550MB_19aug2016 ~/.bitcoin_pruned
Run bitcoin-qt
When you start bitcoin-qt, a new wallet will be created: back it up first. My advice is to use bitcoin-qt 0.13.0rc3, because it creates a HD wallet that never runs out of addresses.
Start bitcoin-qt in fast start-up mode first:
bitcoin-qt –prune=550 –checklevel=2 –checkblocks=10 –checkblocksverify=10 –datadir=yourpath/.bitcoin_pruned
and let it sync quickly. Check more thoroughly next time with 10 -> 500000.
You can have a quick look at what’s happening:
tail ~/.bitcoin_pruned/debug.log.
 
FOR NOW, the drawback is that if you want to add addresses (watch-only or spendable) that already contain bitcoins, you have to create the pruned blockchain from scratch yourself, which takes a lot of time (or have someone with a full blockchain rescan the wallet for you). This is not really necessary: if the user is not interested in the history of his transactions, the balances can be obtained directly from the UTXO set. It has already been approved to add this feature in some future Core release:
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/issues?q=is%3Aissue+is%3Aopen+label%3AWallet, #8497.
I will automatically update the google drive with new up-to-date blockchains soon.
EDIT:
openssl dgst -sha256 bitcoin_blockchain_pruned_550MB_19aug2016.tar.gz SHA256(bitcoin_blockchain_pruned_550MB_19aug2016.tar.gz)= ce36bcb9ab691c358b27d3051f8f38452bc182ca636eae992563c60805a9d4b0
submitted by sumBTC to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Don't make the same mistakes I made

I first got "into" bitcoin about 2 years ago when bitcoin was about $5-10 each. I started mining with my gpu on slush's pool and got to 1 bitcoin and had it sent to my wallet. I then raised the threshold to 10 bitcoins, but I only got to 2.88 bitcoins before I lost my interest because at the time (and even now) I don't have a lot of money and couldn't afford to replace my gpu if it died an early life from being ran at 100% for so long, especially with bitcoins being as cheap as they were.
So here's where I made my 3 essential mistakes:
1: I didn't pay attention to what I was doing
2: I left bitcoins in the mining pool account
3: I didn't continue mining
I got a new larger SSD and backed up some stuff onto an external and wiped the old one for a fresh install of windows. I didn't realize that I didn't make sure to back up my wallet until months later, but by that time I didn't really care too much. I did backup my entire windows profile though (I'm sure you see where this is going). So I spent the last year and a half thinking that bitcoin was gone as I watched the price of bitcoin climb, climb, and climb some more, getting a little more upset at each hurdle, but still thinking "well at least I still have that 2.88 bitcoins"
So then I fast forward to about a week or so ago when bitcoin flew past 700+. I think "oh I should log into slush's pool" and what do I find when I log in? an empty balance. Somehow someone took my coins! Now that was really devastating, but I only have myself to blame for not making sure I transferred those funds to my own wallet.
But tonight I had a spark of dumb genius luck. I tried doing data recovery on my old SSD with low hopes since that computer has been in use for so long, the data has likely been overwritten. Obviously I found nothing. I give up and lie down in bed, but I can't sleep still. So I get up and plug my external in and start searching, and what else do I find but a bitcoin folder in my appdata folder, and what's this? it contains a bitcoin.dat! All this time I assumed that the bitcoin.dat was contained in the program files directory, not appdata! So first thing I do is backup my current wallet.dat, and put this one in its place and rescan with bitcoin-qt. After scanning, the program opens and my first 1BTC is sitting right before my eyes, back in my possession after all this time.
It's kindof a bittersweet ending, because yeah, I still am out 2.88BTC, and the full amount could have paid for half of the debt I'm in, and I'm sure if I waited out longer, I could have paid it all off in full which would have been great because all the money going towards bills could be put back into investing in bitcoin. But not all is lost, and I'm definitely being more careful from here on out.
submitted by WolfDemon to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Facilitating Discussion of 0.9.0 FINAL of Bitcoin Core (aka Bitcoin QT)

To facilitate a detailed discussion of some of the finer points of this update, I added numbering to each bullet in release notes, and also posted it to RapGenius, where people can annotate it if they'd like.
I'm not a programmer, but I'm curious to hear what programmers and other people smarter than me have to say about all the new changes.
http://rapgenius.com/The-bitcoin-dev-team-bitcoin-090-final-lyrics
EDIT1 : Doh! Reddit detroyed all the formatting and now i'm on baby duty so can't fix it. EDIT 2: Nap time! Just fixed the formatting :)
---- 0.9.0 RELEASE NOTES ----
Part 1. RPC:
1.1 - New notion of 'conflicted' transactions, reported as confirmations: -1
1.2 - 'listreceivedbyaddress' now provides tx ids
1.3 - Add raw transaction hex to 'gettransaction' output
1.4 - Updated help and tests for 'getreceivedby(account|address)'
1.5 - In 'getblock', accept 2nd 'verbose' parameter, similar to getrawtransaction, but defaulting to 1 for backward compatibility
1.6 - Add 'verifychain', to verify chain database at runtime
1.7 - Add 'dumpwallet' and 'importwallet' RPCs
1.8 - 'keypoolrefill' gains optional size parameter
1.9 - Add 'getbestblockhash', to return tip of best chain
1.10 - Add 'chainwork' (the total work done by all blocks since the genesis block) to 'getblock' output
1.11 - Make RPC password resistant to timing attacks
1.12 - Clarify help messages and add examples
1.13 - Add 'getrawchangeaddress' call for raw transaction change destinations
1.14 - Reject insanely high fees by default in 'sendrawtransaction'
1.15 - Add RPC call 'decodescript' to decode a hex-encoded transaction script
1.16 - Make 'validateaddress' provide redeemScript
1.17 - Add 'getnetworkhashps' to get the calculated network hashrate
1.18 - New RPC 'ping' command to request ping, new 'pingtime' and 'pingwait' fields in 'getpeerinfo' output
1.19 - Adding new 'addrlocal' field to 'getpeerinfo' output
1.20 - Add verbose boolean to 'getrawmempool'
1.21 - Add rpc command 'getunconfirmedbalance' to obtain total unconfirmed balance
1.22 - Explicitly ensure that wallet is unlocked in importprivkey
1.23 - Add check for valid keys in importprivkey
Part 2. Command-line options:
2.1 - New option: -nospendzeroconfchange to never spend unconfirmed change outputs
2.2 - New option: -zapwallettxes to rebuild the wallet's transaction information
2.3 - Rename option '-tor' to '-onion' to better reflect what it does
2.4 - Add '-disablewallet' mode to let bitcoind run entirely without wallet (when built with wallet)
2.5 - Update default '-rpcsslciphers' to include TLSv1.2
2.6 - make '-logtimestamps' default on and rework help-message
2.7 - RPC client option: '-rpcwait', to wait for server start
2.8 - Remove '-logtodebugger'
2.9 - Allow -noserver with bitcoind
Part 3. Block-chain handling and storage:
3.1 - Update leveldb to 1.15
3.2 - Check for correct genesis (prevent cases where a datadir from the wrong network is accidentally loaded)
3.3 - Allow txindex to be removed and add a reindex dialog
3.4 - Log aborted block database rebuilds
3.5 - Store orphan blocks in serialized form, to save memory
3.6 - Limit the number of orphan blocks in memory to 750
3.7 - Fix non-standard disconnected transactions causing mempool orphans
3.8 - Add a new checkpoint at block 279,000
Part 4. Wallet:
4.1 - Bug fixes and new regression tests to correctly compute the balance of wallets containing double-spent (or mutated) transactions
4.2 - Store key creation time. Calculate whole-wallet birthday
4.3 - Optimize rescan to skip blocks prior to birthday
4.4 - Let user select wallet file with -wallet=foo.dat
4.5 - Consider generated coins mature at 101 instead of 120 blocks
4.6 - Improve wallet load time
4.7 - Don't count txins for priority to encourage sweeping
4.8 - Don't create empty transactions when reading a corrupted wallet
4.9 - Fix rescan to start from beginning after importprivkey
4.10 - Only create signatures with low S values
Part 5. Mining:
5.1 - Increase default -blockmaxsize/prioritysize to 750K/50K
5.2 - 'getblocktemplate' does not require a key to create a block template
5.3 - Mining code fee policy now matches relay fee policy
Part 6. Protocol and network:
6.1 - Drop the fee required to relay a transaction to 0.01mBTC per kilobyte
6.2 - Send tx relay flag with version
6.3 - New 'reject' P2P message (BIP 0061, see https://gist.github.com/gavinandresen/7079034 for draft)
6.4 - Dump addresses every 15 minutes instead of 10 seconds
6.5 - Relay OP_RETURN data TxOut as standard transaction type
6.6 - Remove CENT-output free transaction rule when relaying
6.7 - Lower maximum size for free transaction creation
6.8 - Send multiple inv messages if mempool.size > MAX_INV_SZ
6.9 - Split MIN_PROTO_VERSION into INIT_PROTO_VERSION and MIN_PEER_PROTO_VERSION
6.10 - Do not treat fFromMe transaction differently when broadcasting
6.11 - Process received messages one at a time without sleeping between messages
6.12 - Improve logging of failed connections
6.13 - Bump protocol version to 70002
6.14 - Add some additional logging to give extra network insight
6.15 - Added new DNS seed from bitcoinstats.com
Part 7. Validation:
7.1 - Log reason for non-standard transaction rejection
7.2 - Prune provably-unspendable outputs, and adapt consistency check for it
7.3 - Detect any sufficiently long fork and add a warning
7.4 - Call the -alertnotify script when we see a long or invalid fork
7.5 - Fix multi-block reorg transaction resurrection
7.6 - Reject non-canonically-encoded serialization sizes
7.7 - Reject dust amounts during validation
7.8 - Accept nLockTime transactions that finalize in the next block
Part 8. Build system:
8.1 - Switch to autotools-based build system
8.2 - Build without wallet by passing --disable-wallet to configure, this removes the BerkeleyDB dependency
8.3 - Upgrade gitian dependencies (libpng, libz, libupnpc, boost, openssl) to more recent versions
8.4 - Windows 64-bit build support
8.5 - Solaris compatibility fixes
8.6 - Check integrity of gitian input source tarballs
8.7 - Enable full GCC Stack-smashing protection for all OSes
Part 9. GUI:
9.1 - Switch to Qt 5.2.0 for Windows build
9.2 - Add payment request (BIP 0070) support
9.3 - Improve options dialog
9.4 - Show transaction fee in new send confirmation dialog
9.5 - Add total balance in overview page
9.6 - Allow user to choose data directory on first start, when data directory ismissing, or when the -choosedatadir option is passed
9.7 - Save and restore window positions
9.8 - Add vout index to transaction id in transactions details dialog
9.9 - Add network traffic graph in debug window
9.10 - Add open URI dialog
9.11 - Add Coin Control Features
9.12 - Improve receive coins workflow: make the 'Receive' tab into a form to request payments, and move historical address list functionality to File menu
9.13 - Rebrand to Bitcoin Core
9.14 - Move initialization/shutdown to a thread. This prevents "Not responding" messages during startup. Also show a window during shutdown
9.15 - Don't regenerate autostart link on every client startup
9.16 - Show and store message of normal bitcoin:URI
9.17 - Fix richtext detection hang issue on very old Qt versions
9.18 - OS X: Make use of the 10.8+ user notification center to display Growl-like notifications
9.19 - OS X: Added NSHighResolutionCapable flag to Info.plist for better font rendering on Retina displays
9.20 - OS X: Fix bitcoin-qt startup crash when clicking dock icon
9.21 - Linux: Fix Gnome bitcoin: URI handler
Part 10. Miscellaneous:
10.1 - Add Linux script (contrib/qos/tc.sh) to limit outgoing bandwidth
10.2 - Add '-regtest' mode, similar to testnet but private with instant block generation with 'setgenerate' RPC
10.3 - Add 'linearize.py' script to contrib, for creating bootstrap.dat
10.4 - Add separate bitcoin-cli client
submitted by WhiteyFisk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC community? Here is a exhaustive manual to get you up and running. (Only takes about 20-30 minutes if you are fluent in command prompt on linux).

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to rBitcoin [link] [comments]

Scala and Bitcoin (2) - Basics of Akka and Spray JSON Airbitz Bitcoin Wallet & Business Directory Bitcoin Tap to Pay Using NFC How to Back Up Your Bitcoin Wallet How to Send Bitcoin Using Email or SMS

On Windows you will have to modify the BitCoin application's shortcut to add the datadir parameter, so that everytime you launch BitCoin it will always use the new data directory: "C:\Program Files (x86)\Bitcoin\bitcoin-qt.exe" -datadir=d:\BitCoinData. If you're using Armory to manage BitCoin, you need to set the location for the Bitcoin home ... Bitcoin-Qt version v0.7.2-beta: Usage: bitcoin-qt [command-line options] Options:-? This help message-conf=<file> Specify configuration file (default: bitcoin.conf)-pid=<file> Specify pid file (default: bitcoind.pid)-gen Generate coins-gen=0 Don't generate coins-datadir=<dir> Specify data directory Start Bitcoin, now you will see all the files are created in the new data directory. Linux. By default Bitcoin will put its data here: ~/.bitcoin/ You need to do a "ls -a" to see directories that start with a dot. If that's not it, you can do a search like this: find / -name wallet.dat -print 2>/dev/null Mac. By default Bitcoin will put its ... Bitcoin Core (formerly Bitcoin-Qt) is the third Bitcoin client, developed by Wladimir van der Laan based on the original reference code by Satoshi Nakamoto. It has been bundled with bitcoind since version 0.5. Bitcoin-Qt has been rebranded to Bitcoin Core since version 0.9.0 .. Bitcoin Core can be used as a desktop client for regular payments or as a server utility for merchants and other ... 2015-06-16 14:59:17 Default data directory C:\Users\user\AppData\Roaming\Bitcoin: 2015-06-16 14:59:17 Using data directory D:\Crypto\Bitcoin\qt-appdata: 2015-06-16 14:59:17 Using config file D:\Crypto\Bitcoin\qt-appdata\bitcoin.conf: 2015-06-16 14:59:17 Using at most 125 connections (2048 file descriptors available)

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Scala and Bitcoin (2) - Basics of Akka and Spray JSON

Only a login and a password are required and none of your data ever leaves your mobile device without being heavily encrypted. Airbitz is a secure and private Bitcoin wallet with a built in ... The math behind cryptocurrencies. Home page: https://www.3blue1brown.com/ Brought to you by you: http://3b1b.co/btc-thanks And by Protocol Labs: https://prot... See how easy it is to send Bitcoin using the Airbitz mobile app. Airbitz app allows you to create unlimited HD Bitcoin wallets. Only a login and a password are required and none of your data ever ... In the second video of this series, I walk through the basics of both Akka and spray-json by setting up a simple build. Links: Github repo: https://github.co... Hi everyone! Hope you enjoy this episode. We've been super curious about the power of cryptocurrencies so Matt and Thomas decided to test its capacities... B...

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