Bitcoin Know Your Meme

Ultimate glossary of crypto currency terms, acronyms and abbreviations

I thought it would be really cool to have an ultimate guide for those new to crypto currencies and the terms used. I made this mostly for beginner’s and veterans alike. I’m not sure how much use you will get out of this. Stuff gets lost on Reddit quite easily so I hope this finds its way to you. Included in this list, I have included most of the terms used in crypto-communities. I have compiled this list from a multitude of sources. The list is in alphabetical order and may include some words/terms not exclusive to the crypto world but may be helpful regardless.
2FA
Two factor authentication. I highly advise that you use it.
51% Attack:
A situation where a single malicious individual or group gains control of more than half of a cryptocurrency network’s computing power. Theoretically, it could allow perpetrators to manipulate the system and spend the same coin multiple times, stop other users from completing blocks and make conflicting transactions to a chain that could harm the network.
Address (or Addy):
A unique string of numbers and letters (both upper and lower case) used to send, receive or store cryptocurrency on the network. It is also the public key in a pair of keys needed to sign a digital transaction. Addresses can be shared publicly as a text or in the form of a scannable QR code. They differ between cryptocurrencies. You can’t send Bitcoin to an Ethereum address, for example.
Altcoin (alternative coin): Any digital currency other than Bitcoin. These other currencies are alternatives to Bitcoin regarding features and functionalities (e.g. faster confirmation time, lower price, improved mining algorithm, higher total coin supply). There are hundreds of altcoins, including Ether, Ripple, Litecoin and many many others.
AIRDROP:
An event where the investors/participants are able to receive free tokens or coins into their digital wallet.
AML: Defines Anti-Money Laundering laws**.**
ARBITRAGE:
Getting risk-free profits by trading (simultaneous buying and selling of the cryptocurrency) on two different exchanges which have different prices for the same asset.
Ashdraked:
Being Ashdraked is essentially a more detailed version of being Zhoutonged. It is when you lose all of your invested capital, but you do so specifically by shorting Bitcoin. The expression “Ashdraked” comes from a story of a Romanian cryptocurrency investor who insisted upon shorting BTC, as he had done so successfully in the past. When the price of BTC rose from USD 300 to USD 500, the Romanian investor lost all of his money.
ATH (All Time High):
The highest price ever achieved by a cryptocurrency in its entire history. Alternatively, ATL is all time low
Bearish:
A tendency of prices to fall; a pessimistic expectation that the value of a coin is going to drop.
Bear trap:
A manipulation of a stock or commodity by investors.
Bitcoin:
The very first, and the highest ever valued, mass-market open source and decentralized cryptocurrency and digital payment system that runs on a worldwide peer to peer network. It operates independently of any centralized authorities
Bitconnect:
One of the biggest scams in the crypto world. it was made popular in the meme world by screaming idiot Carlos Matos, who infamously proclaimed," hey hey heeeey” and “what's a what's a what's up wasssssssssuuuuuuuuuuuuup, BitConneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeect!”. He is now in the mentally ill meme hall of fame.
Block:
A package of permanently recorded data about transactions occurring every time period (typically about 10 minutes) on the blockchain network. Once a record has been completed and verified, it goes into a blockchain and gives way to the next block. Each block also contains a complex mathematical puzzle with a unique answer, without which new blocks can’t be added to the chain.
Blockchain:
An unchangeable digital record of all transactions ever made in a particular cryptocurrency and shared across thousands of computers worldwide. It has no central authority governing it. Records, or blocks, are chained to each other using a cryptographic signature. They are stored publicly and chronologically, from the genesis block to the latest block, hence the term blockchain. Anyone can have access to the database and yet it remains incredibly difficult to hack.
Bullish:
A tendency of prices to rise; an optimistic expectation that a specific cryptocurrency will do well and its value is going to increase.
BTFD:
Buy the fucking dip. This advise was bestowed upon us by the gods themselves. It is the iron code to crypto enthusiasts.
Bull market:
A market that Cryptos are going up.
Consensus:
An agreement among blockchain participants on the validity of data. Consensus is reached when the majority of nodes on the network verify that the transaction is 100% valid.
Crypto bubble:
The instability of cryptocurrencies in terms of price value
Cryptocurrency:
A type of digital currency, secured by strong computer code (cryptography), that operates independently of any middlemen or central authoritie
Cryptography:
The art of converting sensitive data into a format unreadable for unauthorized users, which when decoded would result in a meaningful statement.
Cryptojacking:
The use of someone else’s device and profiting from its computational power to mine cryptocurrency without their knowledge and consent.
Crypto-Valhalla:
When HODLers(holders) eventually cash out they go to a place called crypto-Valhalla. The strong will be separated from the weak and the strong will then be given lambos.
DAO:
Decentralized Autonomous Organizations. It defines A blockchain technology inspired organization or corporation that exists and operates without human intervention.
Dapp (decentralized application):
An open-source application that runs and stores its data on a blockchain network (instead of a central server) to prevent a single failure point. This software is not controlled by the single body – information comes from people providing other people with data or computing power.
Decentralized:
A system with no fundamental control authority that governs the network. Instead, it is jointly managed by all users to the system.
Desktop wallet:
A wallet that stores the private keys on your computer, which allow the spending and management of your bitcoins.
DILDO:
Long red or green candles. This is a crypto signal that tells you that it is not favorable to trade at the moment. Found on candlestick charts.
Digital Signature:
An encrypted digital code attached to an electronic document to prove that the sender is who they say they are and confirm that a transaction is valid and should be accepted by the network.
Double Spending:
An attack on the blockchain where a malicious user manipulates the network by sending digital money to two different recipients at exactly the same time.
DYOR:
Means do your own research.
Encryption:
Converting data into code to protect it from unauthorized access, so that only the intended recipient(s) can decode it.
Eskrow:
the practice of having a third party act as an intermediary in a transaction. This third party holds the funds on and sends them off when the transaction is completed.
Ethereum:
Ethereum is an open source, public, blockchain-based platform that runs smart contracts and allows you to build dapps on it. Ethereum is fueled by the cryptocurrency Ether.
Exchange:
A platform (centralized or decentralized) for exchanging (trading) different forms of cryptocurrencies. These exchanges allow you to exchange cryptos for local currency. Some popular exchanges are Coinbase, Bittrex, Kraken and more.
Faucet:
A website which gives away free cryptocurrencies.
Fiat money:
Fiat currency is legal tender whose value is backed by the government that issued it, such as the US dollar or UK pound.
Fork:
A split in the blockchain, resulting in two separate branches, an original and a new alternate version of the cryptocurrency. As a single blockchain forks into two, they will both run simultaneously on different parts of the network. For example, Bitcoin Cash is a Bitcoin fork.
FOMO:
Fear of missing out.
Frictionless:
A system is frictionless when there are zero transaction costs or trading retraints.
FUD:
Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt regarding the crypto market.
Gas:
A fee paid to run transactions, dapps and smart contracts on Ethereum.
Halving:
A 50% decrease in block reward after the mining of a pre-specified number of blocks. Every 4 years, the “reward” for successfully mining a block of bitcoin is reduced by half. This is referred to as “Halving”.
Hardware wallet:
Physical wallet devices that can securely store cryptocurrency maximally. Some examples are Ledger Nano S**,** Digital Bitbox and more**.**
Hash:
The process that takes input data of varying sizes, performs an operation on it and converts it into a fixed size output. It cannot be reversed.
Hashing:
The process by which you mine bitcoin or similar cryptocurrency, by trying to solve the mathematical problem within it, using cryptographic hash functions.
HODL:
A Bitcoin enthusiast once accidentally misspelled the word HOLD and it is now part of the bitcoin legend. It can also mean hold on for dear life.
ICO (Initial Coin Offering):
A blockchain-based fundraising mechanism, or a public crowd sale of a new digital coin, used to raise capital from supporters for an early stage crypto venture. Beware of these as there have been quite a few scams in the past.
John mcAfee:
A man who will one day eat his balls on live television for falsely predicting bitcoin going to 100k. He has also become a small meme within the crypto community for his outlandish claims.
JOMO:
Joy of missing out. For those who are so depressed about missing out their sadness becomes joy.
KYC:
Know your customer(alternatively consumer).
Lambo:
This stands for Lamborghini. A small meme within the investing community where the moment someone gets rich they spend their earnings on a lambo. One day we will all have lambos in crypto-valhalla.
Ledger:
Away from Blockchain, it is a book of financial transactions and balances. In the world of crypto, the blockchain functions as a ledger. A digital currency’s ledger records all transactions which took place on a certain block chain network.
Leverage:
Trading with borrowed capital (margin) in order to increase the potential return of an investment.
Liquidity:
The availability of an asset to be bought and sold easily, without affecting its market price.
of the coins.
Margin trading:
The trading of assets or securities bought with borrowed money.
Market cap/MCAP:
A short-term for Market Capitalization. Market Capitalization refers to the market value of a particular cryptocurrency. It is computed by multiplying the Price of an individual unit of coins by the total circulating supply.
Miner:
A computer participating in any cryptocurrency network performing proof of work. This is usually done to receive block rewards.
Mining:
The act of solving a complex math equation to validate a blockchain transaction using computer processing power and specialized hardware.
Mining contract:
A method of investing in bitcoin mining hardware, allowing anyone to rent out a pre-specified amount of hashing power, for an agreed amount of time. The mining service takes care of hardware maintenance, hosting and electricity costs, making it simpler for investors.
Mining rig:
A computer specially designed for mining cryptocurrencies.
Mooning:
A situation the price of a coin rapidly increases in value. Can also be used as: “I hope bitcoin goes to the moon”
Node:
Any computing device that connects to the blockchain network.
Open source:
The practice of sharing the source code for a piece of computer software, allowing it to be distributed and altered by anyone.
OTC:
Over the counter. Trading is done directly between parties.
P2P (Peer to Peer):
A type of network connection where participants interact directly with each other rather than through a centralized third party. The system allows the exchange of resources from A to B, without having to go through a separate server.
Paper wallet:
A form of “cold storage” where the private keys are printed onto a piece of paper and stored offline. Considered as one of the safest crypto wallets, the truth is that it majors in sweeping coins from your wallets.
Pre mining:
The mining of a cryptocurrency by its developers before it is released to the public.
Proof of stake (POS):
A consensus distribution algorithm which essentially rewards you based upon the amount of the coin that you own. In other words, more investment in the coin will leads to more gain when you mine with this protocol In Proof of Stake, the resource held by the “miner” is their stake in the currency.
PROOF OF WORK (POW) :
The competition of computers competing to solve a tough crypto math problem. The first computer that does this is allowed to create new blocks and record information.” The miner is then usually rewarded via transaction fees.
Protocol:
A standardized set of rules for formatting and processing data.
Public key / private key:
A cryptographic code that allows a user to receive cryptocurrencies into an account. The public key is made available to everyone via a publicly accessible directory, and the private key remains confidential to its respective owner. Because the key pair is mathematically related, whatever is encrypted with a public key may only be decrypted by its corresponding private key.
Pump and dump:
Massive buying and selling activity of cryptocurrencies (sometimes organized and to one’s benefit) which essentially result in a phenomenon where the significant surge in the value of coin followed by a huge crash take place in a short time frame.
Recovery phrase:
A set of phrases you are given whereby you can regain or access your wallet should you lose the private key to your wallets — paper, mobile, desktop, and hardware wallet. These phrases are some random 12–24 words. A recovery Phrase can also be called as Recovery seed, Seed Key, Recovery Key, or Seed Phrase.
REKT:
Referring to the word “wrecked”. It defines a situation whereby an investor or trader who has been ruined utterly following the massive losses suffered in crypto industry.
Ripple:
An alternative payment network to Bitcoin based on similar cryptography. The ripple network uses XRP as currency and is capable of sending any asset type.
ROI:
Return on investment.
Safu:
A crypto term for safe popularized by the Bizonnaci YouTube channel after the CEO of Binance tweeted
“Funds are safe."
“the exchage I use got hacked!”“Oh no, are your funds safu?”
“My coins better be safu!”


Sats/Satoshi:
The smallest fraction of a bitcoin is called a “satoshi” or “sat”. It represents one hundred-millionth of a bitcoin and is named after Satoshi Nakamoto.
Satoshi Nakamoto:
This was the pseudonym for the mysterious creator of Bitcoin.
Scalability:
The ability of a cryptocurrency to contain the massive use of its Blockchain.
Sharding:
A scaling solution for the Blockchain. It is generally a method that allows nodes to have partial copies of the complete blockchain in order to increase overall network performance and consensus speeds.
Shitcoin:
Coin with little potential or future prospects.
Shill:
Spreading buzz by heavily promoting a particular coin in the community to create awareness.
Short position:
Selling of a specific cryptocurrency with an expectation that it will drop in value.
Silk road:
The online marketplace where drugs and other illicit items were traded for Bitcoin. This marketplace is using accessed through “TOR”, and VPNs. In October 2013, a Silk Road was shut down in by the FBI.
Smart Contract:
Certain computational benchmarks or barriers that have to be met in turn for money or data to be deposited or even be used to verify things such as land rights.
Software Wallet:
A crypto wallet that exists purely as software files on a computer. Usually, software wallets can be generated for free from a variety of sources.
Solidity:
A contract-oriented coding language for implementing smart contracts on Ethereum. Its syntax is similar to that of JavaScript.
Stable coin:
A cryptocoin with an extremely low volatility that can be used to trade against the overall market.
Staking:
Staking is the process of actively participating in transaction validation (similar to mining) on a proof-of-stake (PoS) blockchain. On these blockchains, anyone with a minimum-required balance of a specific cryptocurrency can validate transactions and earn Staking rewards.
Surge:
When a crypto currency appreciates or goes up in price.
Tank:
The opposite of mooning. When a coin tanks it can also be described as crashing.
Tendies
For traders , the chief prize is “tendies” (chicken tenders, the treat an overgrown man-child receives for being a “Good Boy”) .
Token:
A unit of value that represents a digital asset built on a blockchain system. A token is usually considered as a “coin” of a cryptocurrency, but it really has a wider functionality.
TOR: “The Onion Router” is a free web browser designed to protect users’ anonymity and resist censorship. Tor is usually used surfing the web anonymously and access sites on the “Darkweb”.
Transaction fee:
An amount of money users are charged from their transaction when sending cryptocurrencies.
Volatility:
A measure of fluctuations in the price of a financial instrument over time. High volatility in bitcoin is seen as risky since its shifting value discourages people from spending or accepting it.
Wallet:
A file that stores all your private keys and communicates with the blockchain to perform transactions. It allows you to send and receive bitcoins securely as well as view your balance and transaction history.
Whale:
An investor that holds a tremendous amount of cryptocurrency. Their extraordinary large holdings allow them to control prices and manipulate the market.
Whitepaper:

A comprehensive report or guide made to understand an issue or help decision making. It is also seen as a technical write up that most cryptocurrencies provide to take a deep look into the structure and plan of the cryptocurrency/Blockchain project. Satoshi Nakamoto was the first to release a whitepaper on Bitcoin, titled “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System” in late 2008.
And with that I finally complete my odyssey. I sincerely hope that this helped you and if you are new, I welcome you to crypto. If you read all of that I hope it increased, you in knowledge.
my final definition:
Crypto-Family:
A collection of all the HODLers and crypto fanatics. A place where all people alike unite over a love for crypto.
We are all in this together as we pioneer the new world that is crypto currency. I wish you a great day and Happy HODLing.
-u/flacciduck
feel free to comment words or terms that you feel should be included or about any errors I made.
Edit1:some fixes were made and added words.
submitted by flacciduck to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

A few stories about Brian Krebs: The independent cybercrime journalist who exposes criminals on the internet

First, a bit of introduction before we get into the living drama that is Brian Krebs.
Brian Krebs has been a journalist for decades, starting in the late 90s. He got his start at The Washington Post, but what he's most famous for are his exposes on criminal businesses and individuals who perpetuate cyber crime worldwide. In 2001, he got his interest in cybercrime piqued when a computer worm locked him out of his own computer. In 2005, he shifted from working as a staff writer at The Washington Post's tech newswire to writing for their security blog, "Security Wire". During his tenure there, he started by focusing on the victims of cybercrime, but later also started to focus on the perpetrators of it as well. His reporting helped lead to the shutdown of McColo, a hosting provider who provided service to some of the world's biggest spammers and hackers. Reports analyzing the shutdown of McColo estimated that global spam volume dropped by between 40 and 70 percent. Further analysis revealed it also played host to child pornography sites, and the Russian Business Network, a major Russian cybercrime ring.
In 2009, Krebs left to start his own site, KrebsOnSecurity. Since then, he's been credited with being the first to report on major events such as Stuxnet and when Target was breached, resulting in the leakage of 40 million cards. He also regularly investigates and reveals criminals' identities on his site. The latter has made him the bane of the world of cybercrime, as well as basically a meme, where criminals will include references like Made by Brian Krebs in their code, or name their shops full of stolen credit cards after him.
One of his first posts on his new site was a selection of his best work. While not particularly dramatic, they serve as an excellent example of dogged investigative work, and his series reveal the trail of takedowns his work has documented, or even contributed to.
And now, a selection of drama involving Krebs. Note, all posts are sarcastically-tinged retellings of the source material which I will link throughout. I also didn't use the real names in my retellings, but they are in the source material. This took way too long to write, and it still does massively condense the events described in the series. Krebs has been involved with feuds with other figures, but I'd argue these tales are the "main" bits of drama that are most suited for here.

Fly on the Wall

By 2013, Krebs was no stranger to cybercriminals taking the fight to the real world. He was swatted previously to the point where the police actually know to give him a ring and see if there'd actually been a murder, or if it was just those wacky hackers at it again. In addition, his identity was basically common knowledge to cybercriminals, who would open lines of credit in his name, or find ways to send him money using stolen credit cards.
However, one particular campaign against him caught his eye. A hacker known as "Fly" aka "Flycracker" aka "MUXACC1" posted on a Russian-language fraud forum he administered about a "Krebs fund". His plan was simple. Raise Bitcoin to buy Heroin off of a darknet marketplace, address it to Krebs, and alert his local police via a spoofed phone call. Now, because Krebs is an investigative journalist, he develops undercover presences on cybercrime forums, and it just so happened he'd built up a presence on this one already.
Guys, it became known recently that Brian Krebs is a heroin addict and he desperately needs the smack, so we have started the "Helping Brian Fund", and shortly we will create a bitcoin wallet called "Drugs for Krebs" which we will use to buy him the purest heroin on the Silk Road. My friends, his withdrawal is very bad, let’s join forces to help the guy! We will save Brian from the acute heroin withdrawal and the world will get slightly better!
Fly had first caught Krebs' attention by taunting him on Twitter, sending him Tweets including insults and abuse, and totally-legit looking links. Probably either laced with malware, or designed to get Krebs' IP. He also took to posting personal details such as Krebs' credit report, directions to his house, and pictures of his front door on LiveJournal, of all places.
So, after spotting the scheme, he alerted his local police that he'd probably have someone sending him some China White. Sure enough, the ne'er-do-wells managed to raise 2 BTC, which at the time was a cool $200 or so. They created an account on the premiere darknet site at the time, The Silk Road under the foolproof name "briankrebs7". They found one seller who had consistently high reviews, but the deal fell through for unknown reasons. My personal theory is the seller decided to Google where it was going, and realized sending a gram of dope into the waiting arms of local law enforcement probably wasn't the best use of his time. Still, the forum members persevered, and found another seller who was running a buy 10 get 2 free promotion. $165 of Bitcoin later, the drugs were on their way to a new home. The seller apparently informed Fly that the shipment should arrive by Tuesday, a fact which he gleefully shared with the forum.
While our intrepid hero had no doubt that the forum members were determined to help him grab the tail of the dragon, he's not one to assume without confirmation, and enlisted the help of a graduate student at UCSD who was researching Bitcoin and anonymity on The Silk Road, and confirmed the address shared by Fly was used to deposit 2 BTC into an account known to be used for money management on the site.
By Monday, an envelope from Chicago had arrived, containing a copy of Chicago confidential. Taped inside were tiny baggies filled with the purported heroin. Either dedicated to satisfied customers, or mathematically challenged, the seller had included thirteen baggies instead of the twelve advertised. A police officer arrived to take a report and whisked the baggies away.
Now, Fly was upset that Krebs wasn't in handcuffs for drug possession, and decided to follow up his stunt by sending Krebs a floral arrangement shaped like a cross, and an accompanying threatening message addressed to his wife, the dire tone slightly undercut by the fact that it was signed "Velvet Crabs". Krebs' curiosity was already piqued from the shenanigans with the heroin, but with the arrival of the flowers decided to dive deeper into the сука behind things.
He began digging into databases from carding sites that had been hacked, but got his first major breakthrough to his identity from a Russian computer forensics firm. Fly had maintained an account on a now-defunct hacking forum, whose database was breached under "Flycracker". It turns out, the email Flycracker had used was also hacked at some point, and a source told Krebs that the email was full of reports from a keylogger Fly had installed on his wife's computer. Now, because presumably his wife wasn't part of, or perhaps even privy to her husband's illicit dealings, her email account happened to be her full legal name, which Krebs was able to trace to her husband. Now, around this time, the site Fly maintained disappeared from the web, and administrators on another major fraud forum started purging his account. This is a step they typically take when they suspect a member has been apprehended by authorities. Nobody knew for sure, but they didn't want to take any chances.
More research by Krebs revealed that the criminals' intuition had been correct, and Fly was arrested in Italy, carrying documents under an assumed name. He was sitting in an Italian jail, awaiting potential extradition to the United States, as well as potentially facing charges in Italy. This was relayed to Krebs by a law enforcement official who simply said "The Fly has been swatted". (Presumably while slowly removing a pair of aviator sunglasses)
While Fly may have been put away, the story between Krebs and Fly wasn't quite over. He did end up being extradited to the US for prosecution, but while imprisoned in Italy, Fly actually started sending Krebs letters. Understandably distrustful after the whole "heroin" thing, his contacts in federal law enforcement tested the letter, and found it to be clean. Inside, there was a heartfelt and personal letter, apologizing for fucking with Krebs in so many ways. He also forgave Krebs for posting his identity online, leading him to muse that perhaps Fly was working through a twelve-step program. In December, he received another letter, this time a simple postcard with a cheerful message wishing him a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Krebs concluded his post thusly:
Cybercrooks have done some pretty crazy stuff to me in response to my reporting about them. But I don’t normally get this kind of closure. I look forward to meeting with Fly in person one day soon now that he will be just a short train ride away. And he may be here for some time: If convicted on all charges, Fly faces up to 30 years in U.S. federal prison.
Fly ultimately was extradited. He plead guilty and was sentenced to 41 months in jail

vDOS and Mirai Break The Internet

Criminals are none too happy when they find their businesses and identities on the front page of KrebsOnSecurity. It usually means law enforcement isn't far behind. One such business was known as vDOS. A DDOS-for-hire (also known as a "booter" or a "stresser") site that found itself hacked, with all their customer records still in their databases leaked. Analysis of the records found that in a four-month time span, the service had been responsible for about 8.81 years worth of attack time, meaning on average at any given second, there were 26 simultaneous attacks running. Interestingly, the hack of vDOS came about from another DDOS-for-hire site, who as it turns out was simply reselling services provided by vDOS. They were far from the only one. vDOS appeared to provide firepower to a large number of different resellers.
In addition to the attack logs, support messages were also among the data stolen. This contained some complaints from various clients who complained they were unable to launch attacks against Israeli IPs. This is a common tactic by hackers to try and avoid unwanted attention from authorities in their country of residence. This was confirmed when two men from Israel were arrested for their involvement in owning and running vDOS. However, this was just the beginning for this bit of drama.
The two men arrested went by the handles "applej4ck" and "Raziel". They had recently published a paper on DDOS attack methods in an online Israeli security magazine. Interestingly, on the same day the men were arrested, questioned, and released on bail, vDOS went offline. Not because it had been taken down by Israeli authorities, not because they had shut it down themselves, but because a DDOS protection firm, BackConnect Security, had hijacked the IP addresses belonging to the company. To spare a lot of technical detail, it's called a BGP hijack, and it basically works by a company saying "Yeah, those are our addresses." It's kind of amazing how much of the internet is basically just secured by the digital equivalent of pinky swears. You can read some more technical detail on Wikipedia. Anyway, we'll get back to BackConnect.
Following the publication of the story uncovering the inner workings of vDOS, KrebsOnSecurity was hit with a record breaking DDOS attack, that peaked at 620/Gbps, nearly double the most powerful DDOS attack previously on record. To put that in perspective, that's enough bandwidth to download 5 simultaneous copies of Interstellar in 4K resolution every single second, and still have room to spare. The attack was so devastating, Akamai, one of the largest providers of DDOS protection in the world had to drop Krebs as a pro bono client. Luckily, Google was willing to step in and place his site under the protection of Google's Project Shield, a free service designed to protect the news sites and journalists from being knocked offline by DDOS attacks.
This attack was apparently in retaliation for the vDOS story, since some of the data sent in the attack included the string "freeapplej4ck". The attack was executed by a botnet of Internet of Things (or IoT) devices. These are those "smart" devices like camera systems, routers, DVRs. Basically things that connect to the cloud. An astounding amount of those are secured with default passwords that can be easily looked up from various sites or even the manufacturers' websites. This was the start of a discovery of a massive botnet that had been growing for years.
Now time for a couple quick side stories:
Dyn, a company who provides DNS to many major companies including Twitter, Reddit, and others came under attack, leaving many sites (including Twitter and Reddit) faltering in the wake of it. Potentially due to one of their engineers' collaboration with Krebs on another story. It turned out that the same botnet that attacked Krebs' site was at least part of the attack on Dyn
And back to BackConnect, that DDOS protection firm that hijacked the IP addresses from vDOS. Well it turns out BGP Hijacks are old hat for the company. They had done it at least 17 times before. Including at least once (purportedly with permission) for the address 1.3.3.7. Aka, "leet". It turns out one of the co-founders of BackConnect actually posted screenshots of him visiting sites that tell you your public IP address in a DDOS mitigation industry chat, showing it as 1.3.3.7. They also used a BGP Hijack against a hosting company and tried to frame a rival DDOS mitigation provider.
Finally, another provider, Datawagon was interestingly implicated in hosting DDOS-for-hire sites while offering DDOS protection. In a Skype conversation where the founder of Datawagon wanted to talk about that time he registered dominos.pizza and got sued for it, he brings up scanning the internet for vulnerable routers completely unprompted. Following the publication of the story about BackConnect, in which he was included in, he was incensed about his portrayal, and argued with Krebs over Skype before Krebs ultimately ended up blocking him. He was subsequently flooded with fake contact requests from bogus or hacked Skype accounts. Shortly thereafter, the record-breaking DDOS attack rained down upon his site.
Back to the main tale!
So, it turns out the botnet of IoT devices was puppeteered by a malware called Mirai. How did it get its name? Well, that's the name its creator gave it, after an anime called Mirai Nikki. How did this name come to light? The creator posted the source code online. (The name part, not the origin. The origin didn't come 'til later.) The post purported that they'd picked it up from somewhere in their travels as a DDOS industry professional. It turns out this is a semi-common tactic when miscreants fear that law enforcement might come looking for them, and having the only copy of the source code of a malware in existence is a pretty strong indicator that you have something to do with it. So, releasing the source to the world gives a veneer of plausible deniability should that eventuality come to pass. So who was this mysterious benefactor of malware source? They went by the name "Anna-senpai".
As research on the Mirai botnet grew, and more malware authors incorporated parts of Mirai's source code into their own attacks, attention on the botnet increased, and on the people behind it. The attention was presumably the reason why Hackforums, the forum where the source code was posted, later disallowed ostensible "Server Stress Tester" services from being sold on it. By December, "Operation Tarpit" had wrought 34 arrests and over a hundred "knock and talk" interviews questioning people about their involvement.
By January, things started to come crashing down. Krebs published an extensive exposé on Anna-senpai detailing all the evidence linking them to the creation of Mirai. The post was so big, he included a damn glossary. What sparked the largest botnet the internet had ever seen? Minecraft. Minecraft servers are big business. A popular one can earn tens of thousands of dollars per month from people buying powers, building space, or other things. It's also a fiercely competitive business, with hundreds of servers vying for players. It turns out that things may have started, as with another set of companies, two rival DDOS mitigation providers competing for customers. ProTraf was a provider of such mitigation technology, and a company whose owner later worked for ProTraf had on at least one occasion hijacked addresses belonging to another company, ProxyPipe. ProxyPipe had also been hit with DDOS attacks they suspected to be launched by ProTraf.
While looking into the President of ProTraf, Krebs realized he'd seen the relatively uncommon combination of programming languages and skills posted by the President somewhere else. They were shared by Anna-senpai on Hackforums. As Krebs dug deeper and deeper into Anna-senpai's online presence, he uncovered other usernames, including one he traced to some Minecraft forums where a photoshopped picture of a still from Pulp Fiction contained the faces of BackConnect, which was a rival to ProTraf's DDOS mitigation business, and another face. A hacker by the name of Vyp0r, who another employee of ProTraf claimed betrayed his trust and blackmailed him into posting the source of another piece of malware called Bashlite. There was also a third character photoshopped into the image. An anime character named "Yamada" from a movie called B Gata H Hei.
Interestingly, under the same username, Krebs found a "MyAnimeList" profile which, out of 9 titles it had marked as watched, were B Gata H Hei, as well as Mirai Nikki, the show from which Mirai derived its name. It continues on with other evidence, including DDOS attacks against Rutgers University, but in short, there was little doubt in the identity of "Anna-senpai", but the person behind the identity did contact Krebs to comment. He denied any involvement in Mirai or DDOS attacks.
"I don’t think there are enough facts to definitively point the finger at me," [Anna-senpai] said. "Besides this article, I was pretty much a nobody. No history of doing this kind of stuff, nothing that points to any kind of sociopathic behavior. Which is what the author is, a sociopath."
He did, however, correct Krebs on the name of B Gata H Kei.
Epilogue
Needless to say, the Mirai botnet crew was caught, but managed to avoid jailtime thanks to their cooperation with the government. That's not to say they went unpunished. Anna-senpai was sentenced to 6 months confinement, 2500 hours of community service, and they may have to pay up to $8.6 million in restitution for their attacks on Rutgers university.

Other Stories

I don't have the time or energy to write another effortpost, and as is I'm over 20,000 characters, so here's a few other tidbits of Krebs' clashes with miscreants.
submitted by HereComesMyDingDong to internetdrama [link] [comments]

14 Things We Learned Creating a Million Dollar Hyperdeflationary Currency (DRAFT)

14 Things We Learned Creating a Million Dollar Hyperdeflationary Currency (DRAFT)
Four months ago we made a reddit post announcing a social experiment to create a “self-destructing currency” called BOMB. The reactions were polarizing, to say the least:
Some comments were positive
A currency that no one wants to spend but everyone wants to have would result in an ever growing value. However, it might only be on paper because no one wants to spend it. I wonder what will happen. I really hope this gains popularity, very interesting.
Many comments were negative
Aaand this is why crypto is viewed with such cynicism. People can literally create their own private currencies in their basements.
Multiple comments were entertaining
LOL, I wonder how many FBI safeguards this will trigger.
The success and legitimacy of the project were still to be determined, but one thing was for sure: people were curious.

The Big Bang


On January 15th, we launched one million BOMB into the digital abyss known as the blockchain. The rules of the currency were simple:
  • Only 1,000,000 BOMB would be created.
  • Each time the BOMB is transferred, 1% is destroyed
  • There would never be a newly created BOMB.
Over the following months, more than 750,000 tokens were distributed for free, over 3,000 individuals participated, and over 20,000 BOMB were burned through transfers and trading (2% of total supply). The social communities grew into the multiple thousands, and many respected projects began getting involved.
The intention was not to be used as a transactional currency, but rather a consistently deflating and decentralized store of value.
The problem we were attempting to solve (or at least experiment with) is the token velocity problem that plagues many of the tokens in the market today.
The goal was to become the deflationary currency of the decentralized world. Many currencies focus on speed, cost, and privacy. We focus on deflation.

https://preview.redd.it/da1yr3z2qf031.png?width=600&format=png&auto=webp&s=1cea93246a0ce9bb96dd63708371ba66512e8420

The Journey


The reaction of the events over the next months took us down a winding road of adventure and a fair share of heart attacks. One day we would get an endorphin rush after the co-creator of the #OccupyWallStreet movement wrote an article; the next day we would find a major vulnerability in the code that would literally cause us to re-issue tokens.
Through it all, the journey has been a rewarding one, and we learned a lot along the way. Here are the top 14 things we learned while creating a million dollar hyper deflationary currency.

1) A Deflationary Asset Can Survive... So Far At Least.


One of the biggest things we wanted to learn when starting the social experiment was to ask:
“Can a deflationary asset survive?”

Good question in theory, but how do you measure that? Do you measure it by price? Do you measure it by how many people hold it? Do you measure by usage?
Within the community, one of our members recently public a “The Bomb Report”, a case study breakdown of some really interesting statistics and analysis of the currency and the success/failures it has had so far.

Total Bombs Burned per Day


Total Bombs Burned Over Time


Price vs. Total Percentage Bomb Burned

2) If You Build it, They Won’t Come


The blockchain industry consists of some of the most talented technical and visionary minds in the world. However, despite this, most average consumers haven’t experienced a blockchain application or used the currencies built on top of it.
While there is still plenty of time for true mass adoption to occur, it has become clear that the amount of technical value being developed is not equating to the amount of activity or users.
We believe this is not for lack of building, but for lack of storytelling and communication. Average consumers don’t resonate with technological features, they resonate with the stories and the advantages within a solution.
Bitcoin, the most successful cryptocurrency to date, has one of the best stories behind it. An anonymous and mystical figure behind the name of Satoshi Nakamoto took his passion and pain from the financial crisis of 2008 to create a better solution.
The building behind BOMB wasn’t intensive or complex at all, just a few dozen lines of code in solidity. But that wasn’t our story. Our story was our journey and social experimentation of a deflationary currency. That is why people joined, and this is what keeps people intrigued still to this day.

3) Hodling is Still Alive & Kicking


Despite the average airdrop value sitting over $200 per participant, 84.5% of people have not touched or moved their BOMB. Out of 3073 current addresses, 2604 people would rather hold than sell their BOMB.

4) The Cryptocurrency Industry is Skeptical by Default


Despite giving away all our tokens for free and answering questions as transparently as possible, the default response was skepticism; and rightfully so.
Despite over $13,000,000,000 in public capital allocated to the decentralized world in the first half of 2018 alone, over 1000 projects are now dead. Many of the people who joined the industry joined during this time and still feel the resentment to this day.
While it will probably take many years to overcome this skepticism, and may never go away, we learned it is important to take every comment and negative remark in stride. Some are valid concerns, but a majority aren’t actually mad or disgruntled with you, but at the industry as a whole.

5) Going from 0 to 1 is 10x harder than 1 to 10


Like most projects, when we started, our followers and community count started at zero.
During the first few weeks of sharing the story of BOMB with a few friends, the growth was extremely slow (relative to what it is today) at maybe 1–5 people per day.
Nobody wants to be the first to the party. When you’re walking down the street, everyone assumes the crowded bar is better than the empty bar. The one thing you can do to overcome this early stage is making your early adopters feel like absolute VIPs.
More than the early adopters getting more free tokens than everyone else, myself and the co-creators spent endless hours on telegram talking with each and every single person who joined. There was not a lost soul who wandered into our group that didn’t get an overly ambitious introduction.
This is the core and foundation that will set everything in motion. While I no longer introduce myself to every new person to the group, our community does, and its an amazing feeling.

6) Clear & Concise Communication is Everything


When I first started telling my friends about BOMB, the natural response was “What else does it do?”
We as humans have a natural instinct to think more is better. Many founders start with a very clear mission to create something like a comfortable chair but they end up explaining their product as an “Anti-Gravitational Sitting Apparatus to Disrupt the Entire Furniture Industry with Built-in LED Lights and Omni-Rocking Functionality”
The problem is when we try to communicate this vision to the world, our vision becomes convoluted and messy. The most successful projects to date consist of the ones doing one thing better than anyone else.
When people explain what BOMB is, they explain it very clearly and concisely: A deflationary currency. When people explain how BOMB works, they easily recall and reference the three rules of the currency as stated above.

7) Transparently Bad News is Better than No News


The biggest “OH SNAP” moment for BOMB occurred in February, just a few weeks after airdropping our creation to the world. A community member following the project found an error on the code that could open up the currency to exploitation in the future.
Rather than attempting to hide the situation, we made a medium post to explain the situation and news to the community.
Just a few weeks ago, many of our community members began to get anxious about a potential exchange listing that was taking longer than expected. While frustrating to take criticism for items we couldn’t control, we wrote a 19 thread tweet storm titled “Transparency Update”. Despite the negative news, the community loved it and felt closer to the project than ever.
People many times don’t mind what happened, as long as they understand why you did it, and the reasoning behind it. Yes, there will always be that 10% that won’t accept your answer. But the people who truly care about your vision and value will stick with you. Those are the people who matter.

8) You Don’t Need to Spend $25,000 on an Exchange


Getting on an exchange after raising zero capital was definitely hard. We made a commitment early on that we would never ask our community for money, so everything we did had to be extremely scrappy and resourceful.
To help get us off the ground, a few of our early members kept talking about a community/technology called ParJar. In short, this was a telegram bot we could implement that allowed our community to openly trade BOMB instantly and feeless whenever they wanted.
There are a lot of items that helped us build our community, but we believe ParJar gave us more native engagement than any other campaign we have done. This organic incentivization ecosystem for individuals to exchange assets was and continues to be the backbone and foundation for our growth.

9) Not All Exchanges Are Created Equal


Even at the peak of the bear market, exchanges attempted to charge anywhere between $20,000 and $250,000; and those were the low-level ones. We definitely couldn’t afford this.
After doing more research, we narrowed down our goals with exchanges and what we were trying to accomplish. While many projects immediately want to get on the “bigger volume” markets, research showed there were only a handful of exchanges that had real volume. The rest were doing a lot of wash trading.
Instead of going after the top level exchanges, we focused on connecting with other respected and up-and-coming exchanges that would be willing to work with us on integration. The deflationary features inside our contract make us incompatible with many exchanges. This was a full-time job in itself.
After many months of searching, we were able to really connect with the team at DDEX (an exchange that is venture backed by reddit’s co-founder) that saw the potential in BOMB and took a chance on us.

10) Liquidity Premium is a Real Thing


While I have heard the term ‘Liquidity Premium’ before, I didn’t quite know how this would impact a deflationary currency. In short, a liquidity premium occurs when something costs more/less because it has high/low liquidity.
The best way for me to think of this is a house. Although houses are valuable, they many times take months to be sold or liquidated for cash. Because of this, prices can be up to 20–30% lower than it would be if it were liquid.
In relation to BOMB, our goal from the beginning was to decrease token velocity as much as possible. The side effect of this was low liquidity.
As soon as we reached Mercatox (a centralized exchange that didn’t burn the tokens) BOMB value increased by nearly 25–50% overnight.
Of course, we can probably attribute some of this to new eyeballs and demand, but it has been interesting to watch the arbitrage between a DEX (burns BOMB) and a CEX (doesn’t burn BOMB).

Price After Mercatox Listing


11) The Market Decides Value, Not the Founders


One of the biggest questions we got in the early days was:
How much are BOMB worth?
When we explained that the tokens were being given away for free, many equated this to no value.
In traditional coins or tokens, the value is determined (or at least decided) by the founders at the price they are willing to sell them at. If XYZ project decides to launch an ICO and sell them at $1, that is the given “value” of the token.
The problem with this premise is that this initial value is completely arbitrary and theoretical until it can be actively traded. I can attempt to sell my car for $250,000, but if the market will only pay me $250, that’s what its worth.
If we learned one thing from the 2018 bear market, its that the founder’s of projects are very bad at knowing the intrinsic value of their own tokens; many times 90–99% off.
Rather than giving our token an arbitrary number, we gave every single token away for free and let the world decide its value.

12) Capital is a Luxury, Not a Necessity


In the startup world, people many times reference the Lean Startup approach. The premise is pretty simple, get your idea into the world for as little amount of money as possible, and see if the world is willing to give it value. In the cryptocurrency world, everything seems to be backward.
Cryptocurrencies spend months planning an ICO, then another few years developing a project, only to find out if their idea is worth building. Millions of dollars are spent on the building before confirming the demand.
IF you truly believe you have an idea that people want or need, and IF you are willing/able to build an MVP first, and IF you want to build a community fueled project; give a portion away for free and let the market decide your fate.
Then, if the market gives it a thumbs up, you have some liquid capital to build your grand vision; all while raising zero capital.

13) Code is Replicable, Community is Not


One mission of BOMB from the beginning was to hopefully provide a financial case study for other people to learn from and implement into their own tokenomic structure.
We anticipated and expected others to do this. But, what we did not expect is the number of exact copy cats that would arise of the first weeks. At this time on Etherscan, there are more than five other replicas of BOMB that people created.
While we were originally discouraged at others attempting to directly imitate our project, we quickly learned that what made BOMB special was no the code, but the community of people around what we were creating.
You can copy code, but you can’t copy a community.

14) People Who Truly Believe in Something Will Go Above and Beyond


To this day, we haven’t paid anything beyond a few #BombUp rewards to our community. And yet, they do some of the most creative, amazing, and impressive creations we could have ever asked for.

Report: An in-depth financial and data-driven report on BOMB explosions, price, and analytics trends.
Art: Everything from designs to stickers for the community to use and play with.
Bomb Up: A community member-run group that gives away BOMB every day for playing telegram games.
Articles: Some of the most passionate people writing in-depth articles about the project.
Languages: Alternative languages that wanted to discuss BOMB in Russian and German.

Conclusion


There is no doubt that to some, BOMB will be nothing more than a meme coin, and we are okay with that.
One of the most fascinating parts of this experiment has been watching our original meaning, goal, and vision of BOMB change and evolve for other people over time. Instead of attempting to control the dialogue, we let the community interpret the project in whatever way they want.
This individual empowerment has truly given the currency a life of its own and the amount of fun, insight, and overall awesome people we have been able to connect within our short lifespan has been nothing short of amazing.
At the current rate of deflation, if the current pace stays constant the last BOMB is expected o be destroyed by 2031.

BombLytics Bot

_______________________________________________

If you would prefer reading or sharing this story through a medium format, here is the link.
submitted by Kowallo to u/Kowallo [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: btc top posts from 2018-04-20 to 2018-05-20 06:58 PDT

Period: 29.85 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 53623
Rate (per day) 33.50 1780.26
Unique Redditors 466 5134
Combined Score 118969 219877

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 7839 points, 57 submissions: MemoryDealers
    1. If all the 32MB blocks were permanently 100% full, this $400 hard drive could store the blockchain for the next 7 years. (373 points, 352 comments)
    2. The people behind Bitcoin Cash are the ones who created Bitcoin's network effect in the first place. (357 points, 123 comments)
    3. Bitcoin subscribers are now calling for people to report Bitcoin.com to the Internet Crime Complaint Center of the FBI. It's sad that BTC supporters all seem to be statists who yell about hodling their muh store of value all day. (348 points, 288 comments)
    4. I have more emails saved on my computer than the entire BTC or BCH block chains. (319 points, 131 comments)
    5. Bitcoin.com is now sponsoring pro female MMA athletes. (293 points, 121 comments)
    6. CoinGeek will support Bitcoin.com in lawsuit over the real Bitcoin - Coingeek (273 points, 354 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Cash is now on iOS in the world’s most popular crypto wallet. #winning (257 points, 131 comments)
    8. "The vast majority of mining hash power was controlled by people who were psychologically incapable of disobedience to perceived authority." -Mike Hearn (250 points, 194 comments)
    9. "BTC True Believers" Are Boycotting the First National Talk Radio Show that ever Discussed Bitcoin because they accept BCH payments. (245 points, 116 comments)
    10. All I keep hearing is that Bitcoin Cash is an infested cesspool of lawless, leaderless, disrespectful, narcissistic, greedy, scammy, capitalistic anarchists that will never create digital money! I swear I’m getting dejavu! (225 points, 46 comments)
  2. 3965 points, 19 submissions: hunk_quark
    1. Warren Buffet's Berkshire is the single largest stockholder in BoA and WellsFargo. In case you were wondering about his attitude towards Bitcoin. (614 points, 114 comments)
    2. Purse.io is paying its employees in Bitcoin Cash. (447 points, 63 comments)
    3. Shoutout to Kraken for standing up to NY Attorney General. If Schneiderman wants transparency and accountability he should be looking into auditing the fed. (406 points, 28 comments)
    4. Bitcoin is rat poison. The bankers are the rats. (404 points, 56 comments)
    5. Forbes Author Frances Coppola takes blockstream to task. (364 points, 35 comments)
    6. Purse CEO Andrew Lee confirms they are paying employees in BCH and native BCH integration update will be coming soon! (343 points, 43 comments)
    7. PSA: So called 'low-fee' cryptocurrency Litecoin has transaction fees 20x higher than Bitcoin Cash (264 points, 80 comments)
    8. After today's BCH Upgrade, longer posts are now enabled on memo.cash! (250 points, 31 comments)
    9. Jeffrey Tucker is promoting bitcoin.com at Atlanta Bitcoin Embassy. (195 points, 57 comments)
    10. Anti-Bitcoiners, life comes at you fast! (109 points, 26 comments)
  3. 3846 points, 30 submissions: Kain_niaK
    1. Bitcoin Cash has not only removed the cap on transactions but also the cap on development. Something new pops up every time I blink. (368 points, 162 comments)
    2. I am getting flashbacks from when I tried to close my Bank of America account ... (353 points, 155 comments)
    3. Fucking /bitcoin assholes reported my twitter account and now I need to verify with a phone number before I can continue with twitter. (325 points, 218 comments)
    4. Paul Wasensteiner: When is @Twitter going to fix the abuse of the report button by @bitcoincoreorg supporters? Why are supporters of a supposedly censorship-resistant money using censorship at every opportunity? (295 points, 106 comments)
    5. We should pirate the entire piratebay.org website and all it's functionality directly on to the Bitcoin Cash blockchain. The piratebay.org is just magnet links and comments. Then they will say bcash stole our business ... (232 points, 439 comments)
    6. Fees higher than a dollar cent or waiting times longer than a couple of seconds defeat the entire purpose of why Bitcoin was invented. (218 points, 164 comments)
    7. moneybutton.com is a configurable client-side Bitcoin Cash (BCH) wallet in an iframe. When the user makes a payment, a webhook URL is called allowing your app to respond to the payment, such as displaying content behind a pay wall. (189 points, 37 comments)
    8. We proudly present BCHpizza.org! Now the community can create city bounties for pizza shops to incentivize them to accept Bitcoin Cash. First pizza shop in a city to do so gets the bounty! (177 points, 117 comments)
    9. Bitcoin Cash can turn in to the biggest non violent protest against the establishment ever : "We simply stop using their money." Which is a great way of getting edgy teenagers to join us. There is an almost infinite supply of edgy teenagers in the world. (156 points, 42 comments)
    10. We need testers for the Cash Shuffle plugin. (121 points, 17 comments)
  4. 3666 points, 28 submissions: Windowly
    1. "Billion-dollar corporations take note: Bitcoin Cash is open for business! Just try to fill up our blocks, I dare you. There will be no "Fidelity Effect" with BCH. Unlike BTC, we want you to use the Blockchain. BCH never really hits a scale ceiling."~Dr. Peter Rizun (415 points, 177 comments)
    2. "In a discussion group of BCH, lots of investors concerned about the address confusing problem. BCH community should push every software of ecosystem to upgrade to Cashaddr ASAP."~Jihan Wu (366 points, 215 comments)
    3. "Maybe the best way to bring economic freedom to the world is to make an uncensorable Twitter."~Ryan X. Charles (300 points, 114 comments)
    4. Newbie tip! Do yourself a favor, get a Protonmail email account and switch all your crypto exchanges to that email. No reason Google/Gmail need to have your entire crypto history at their fingertips. (299 points, 133 comments)
    5. "On the 15th of May, I'll be popping the champagne, not to celebrate high fees, but to celebrate continued low fees, privacy enablements, smart contract capabilities, and PayPal level throughput capability."~Eli Afram (233 points, 46 comments)
    6. 24% of the trading on GDAX in the last 24 hours was for Bitcoin Cash (BCH)! 😊💃 (185 points, 16 comments)
    7. Yeah!! "We are pleased to announce that the new Bitcoin Cash address format has been implemented on QuadrigaCX. This will help our users to easily distinguish Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash addresses when funding/withdrawing their account. The BCH legacy addresses will still be supported." (165 points, 8 comments)
    8. ANNOUNCE: Coinbase has blocked the official @WikiLeaks shop from its platform without notice or explanation. You can continue to donate #Bitcoin to WikiLeaks at https://WikiLeaks.org/donate . (164 points, 55 comments)
    9. There is a Bitcoin Unlimited election today. (BU is one of the 6+ development teams that develop clients for Bitcoin Cash (BCH). BU has a unique governance system where developers are not king. . instead members vote on proposals. If you are a member, please vote! (161 points, 29 comments)
    10. Bitpay Adds Bitcoin Cash Support to Checkout Point-of-Sale App - Bitcoin News (151 points, 22 comments)
  5. 2565 points, 15 submissions: BitcoinXio
    1. Bitcoin Cash is upgrading on May 15 to 32MB max block limit (575 points, 335 comments)
    2. Frances Coppola on Twitter: “Congratulations, Blockstream, you have just reinvented the interbank lending market.” (411 points, 139 comments)
    3. Once again Core supporters threaten with lawsuits and government intervention to try to get their way. This is just pathetic and not the foundations of what Bitcoin was built on. These are not bitcoiners. (299 points, 355 comments)
    4. Get ready - Bitcoin Cash is upgrading on May 15th! (198 points, 132 comments)
    5. CobraBitcoin: "Lightning is cool, but nobody should be recommending it to actual merchants for at least the next few years. Merchants like Steam already got hurt by adopting Bitcoin and regretting it later. Lightning needs time to mature and prove itself. Mad hype to rush adoption will harm it." (157 points, 58 comments)
    6. Blockchain on Twitter: “What's that you see? It's all your BCH that now appears in your #ios wallet. Take control of your financial future and #beyourownbank today.” (138 points, 20 comments)
    7. We are living in the digital age of information, which is why censorship has become such an important issue [...] That’s why I’m excited about decentralized social networks built on top of Bitcoin Cash like @BlockPressApp & @memobch. They are new so need work, but the path is being paved. (131 points, 31 comments)
    8. BlockPress published its protocol (123 points, 22 comments)
    9. We have a new alternative public mod logs (96 points, 35 comments)
    10. If Bitcoin Core (BTC) is no longer usable by many people in the world due to being out priced (high tx fees), is it still “borderless”? I’d argue that it’s no longer borderless if people all over the world are excluded from the network. (95 points, 34 comments)
  6. 2030 points, 11 submissions: tralxz
    1. Breaking News: Winklevoss Brothers Bitcoin Exchange Adds Bitcoin Cash support! (508 points, 115 comments)
    2. Jihan Wu was asked "Why are the miners still supporting Bitcoin Core? Is it just a short term profitability play?", he answered: "Yes, exactly." (279 points, 215 comments)
    3. Cobra:"That feeling when Blockstream, [...] release Liquid, a completely centralized sidechain run only by trusted nodes and designed for banks, financial institutions and exchanges." (245 points, 145 comments)
    4. LibreOffice Foundation accepts Bitcoin Cash donations. (191 points, 11 comments)
    5. Breaking News! Vin Armani: "Major mining pools have agreed to establish a treasury and start funding $BCH development from their block rewards. HUGE!!!" (186 points, 80 comments)
    6. CNBC's Fast Money: Ran NeuNer says he would HODL Bitcoin Cash and sell Bitcoin Core. (172 points, 59 comments)
    7. Jihan Wu on Bloomberg predicting Bitcoin Cash at $100,000 USD in 5 years. (172 points, 65 comments)
    8. Let's start the Bitcoin Cash upgrade party. New era for BCH is coming May 15. Privacy tools + smart contracts + PayPal capacity handling. Exciting times ahead! (106 points, 37 comments)
    9. Coindesk: "Florida Tax Collector to Accept Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash Payments" (60 points, 8 comments)
    10. Adam B.: "Bitcoin is not a democracy". The authoritarian moves by Core makes perfect sense now. (59 points, 46 comments)
  7. 1485 points, 12 submissions: jonald_fyookball
    1. BTCers fundraise for frivolous lawsuit. BCH fundraises to feed Venezuelans. (233 points, 58 comments)
    2. bitcoin admits: best way to use Lightning Network: don't use it. (189 points, 286 comments)
    3. Electron Cash 3.2 is available. Includes new op-codes and fixes for Ledger hardware wallet (180 points, 50 comments)
    4. If you have to call it bcash you've already lost the argument (164 points, 257 comments)
    5. Cash Shuffle plugin 0.2 - Cash Shuffle development continues (131 points, 37 comments)
    6. Claims that BCH is a "centralized coin" are exaggerations at best. (114 points, 83 comments)
    7. (shitpost) philosoraptor meme: if honeybadger don't care... (106 points, 22 comments)
    8. BCH being a minority chain may be a blessing in disguise (97 points, 83 comments)
    9. Another reason to be bullish on BCH (92 points, 18 comments)
    10. BCHpizza already has 4 bounties posted. It's also no longer needed to sign a message to post a bounty. (89 points, 21 comments)
  8. 1393 points, 8 submissions: rdar1999
    1. Naomi Brockwell on Twitter: "[I] won’t succumb to censorship through intimidation." (332 points, 190 comments)
    2. Consensus 2018 sucked hard. Superficial talks, ridiculous ticket price, overcrowded venue. (233 points, 78 comments)
    3. ==> Becash or Begone: reclaiming the "bcash" trolling (213 points, 107 comments)
    4. See in this twitter thread Luke Jr actually arguing that PayPal is cheaper than BCH!! Is this guy in full delirium? Or just spouts misinformation on purpose? (172 points, 227 comments)
    5. ///\ BTC-BCH persists as the most popular trade on ShapeShift.io /// (171 points, 20 comments)
    6. The retard tribalism is so real. SBI japan's financial giant says they will launch a platform with BCH as settlement coin (due to BTC being bad) and XRP as remittances. I provide the link and cryptocurrency shills deny plain literally declared fact. (124 points, 50 comments)
    7. Chris DeRose on Twitter: "So if Roger ver wins the class action lawsuit, I assume that Bitcoin cash can then rightfully sue Bitcoin core proponents for fraud?" (92 points, 61 comments)
    8. Upgrade completed at height 530356! (56 points, 2 comments)
  9. 1377 points, 12 submissions: Egon_1
    1. Genesis Mining:"We are more than happy to announce that Bitcoin Cash is now available as a Native Mining option for all Bitcoin (Sha256) contracts!" (287 points, 22 comments)
    2. Jihan Wu on BCH Lighthouse:”This project was abandoned on BTC Blockchain long time ago, it is very excited to see it is alive again on BCH Blockchain. It can be very huge.” (278 points, 50 comments)
    3. Yahoo Finance: "Bitcoin Goes Lateral as Bitcoin Cash Steals the Show… AGAIN" (189 points, 46 comments)
    4. "Bitcoin Cash is actually more interesting ..." (119 points, 15 comments)
    5. Jeff Garzik:"Just got an earful from a Chicago cabbie, on $LTC He was very grumpy at @SatoshiLite selling, saying it indicated a lack of founder's confidence in his own creation. #StreetCrypto" (100 points, 8 comments)
    6. “Why don't we start saying: "Bitcoin is Cash" It's much harder to refute than "Bitcoin Cash IS Bitcoin"“ (75 points, 49 comments)
    7. "Because Bitcoin Cash is effectively Bitcoin ✌️ (72 points, 22 comments)
    8. Bye Bye P2P Electronic Cash ... (68 points, 88 comments)
    9. Bitcoin.com Wallet needs more useful services integrated... beyond Shapeshift (59 points, 24 comments)
    10. BCH keeps bitcoins minions busy (48 points, 28 comments)
  10. 1291 points, 9 submissions: increaseblocks
    1. Vitalik Buterin says what we've all been saying - CoinDesk is scammy and complicit bad actor in the cryptocurrency world and should be shunned (510 points, 61 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Wallet Mycelium Begins Rolling Out Bitcoin Cash BCH Support (163 points, 39 comments)
    3. Cheddr is a Bitcoin Cash Point Of Sale system that runs in most modern browsers - no server infrastructure required (137 points, 31 comments)
    4. Leaked Telegram chat shows bitcoin.com "fraud" lawsuit was abandoned due to lack of support 😂😂😂 (135 points, 32 comments)
    5. Toshi to expand beyond Ethereum - will add Bitcoin Cash (91 points, 7 comments)
    6. Litecoin transaction fees 20 times higher than Bitcoin Cash (85 points, 44 comments)
    7. DAMN BCH! (68 points, 25 comments)
    8. In honor of the Bitcoin Cash successful upgrade and now we have the true lightning network. I present to you lightningnetwork.cash! (58 points, 22 comments)
    9. Bcore shills are crying right now 😭😭😂😂 (44 points, 10 comments)
  11. 1202 points, 9 submissions: SharkLaserrrrr
    1. Memo is now open source! (361 points, 160 comments)
    2. Based on @BitcoinCashFund report, preliminary calculation: Total spent: $153,138.49 Total spent on Salaries and Travel: $101,996.79 ~66% of donations is spent on themselves, charities/non-profits (official registered ones) limit themselves to less than 10% (161 points, 181 comments)
    3. [PREVIEW] Looks like Lighthouse powered by Bitcoin Cash is coming together nicely thanks to the hard work of an anonymous developer. I wonder how Mike Hearn feels about his project being resurrected. (159 points, 24 comments)
    4. We heard you want a Bitcoin Cash exclusive wallet that uses ‘bits’ and enables you to buy anything online and pay with Bitcoin Cash so we are building one #cashpay #CryptonizeYourPurchases (137 points, 77 comments)
    5. Bitcoin Cash is the real Bitcoin experience. If you have any doubts, go buy something on cryptonize.it, then buy something off a Lightning store and compare what you had to go through to pay for your order. (103 points, 51 comments)
    6. As of today, cryptonize.it shows prices in Bitcoin Cash next to fiat! (81 points, 9 comments)
    7. Incompatible protocols gave us the ’90s web which was not a pretty sight. Let’s not repeat the same mistakes when building censorship resisted social media powered by Bitcoin Cash. Support @MemoBCH protocol. (72 points, 57 comments)
    8. To help developers raise funds, cryptonize.it is sponsoring a Lighthouse server and website so useful projects can be funded by the community directly. (66 points, 7 comments)
    9. $25,- Amazon gift cards back in store, 0-conf. instant delivery, the real bitcoin experience (62 points, 18 comments)
  12. 1189 points, 1 submission: ocist1121
    1. No spend (1189 points, 87 comments)
  13. 1148 points, 6 submissions: BeijingBitcoins
    1. Three years ago today, Mike Hearn published an article explaining exactly what would happen when the 1MB blocksize limit was hit. He was right on all counts. (473 points, 173 comments)
    2. An easy way to visualize the August 1st Hard Fork. Neither of the two branches resulting from a fork can be called "the original road," but only one branch continues towards the same destination. (163 points, 140 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Core fanatics are trying to organize a lawsuit against Bitcoin.com for using the term "Bitcoin (BCH)", while they run around all day labelling it "Bcash" (157 points, 167 comments)
    4. "Bitcoin Cash won't "fork" in May. Instead, Bitcoin Cash will just upgrade." (123 points, 53 comments)
    5. Just launched: Satoshi Pulse, by Bitcoin.com (121 points, 44 comments)
    6. Ryan Charles delivers an epic rant about Lightning Network problems (111 points, 19 comments)
  14. 1085 points, 10 submissions: unitedstatian
    1. Reminder: Blockstream plans to make money from the proprietary solutions it sells, which is why it moved away from the free permissionless blockchain to an abstracted layer on top which requires 3rd party solutions to be cost effective for most users. (220 points, 146 comments)
    2. It seems there's been a massive propaganda campaign to brainwash people into thinking hardforks are bad. (180 points, 56 comments)
    3. BCH could really be missing the new big use case. Gamers would love to have real ownership of game items. The first game which will integrate a digital coin and make it popular will be groundbreaking. (141 points, 76 comments)
    4. The guy had 350 bucks received via Lightning Network but he can't even close the channels to actually withdraw the bitcoins. (139 points, 188 comments)
    5. What gives Core the right to change the model so drastically and still keep the brand name? (119 points, 117 comments)
    6. One of the most ignorant - even anti-crypto - argument I hear around is that BCH is a currency controlled by Chinese miners. (88 points, 74 comments)
    7. The first megabytes are far more crucial than the 100th. Not every MB was born equal and by giving up on adoption for years Core may have given up on adoption forever. (69 points, 20 comments)
    8. In light of the recent ERC-20 bug I think this is a good time to remember these wise words (54 points, 25 comments)
    9. If BCH had decent privacy features it'd gain so much more market share. It's hard to compete with privacy-always-on coins such as XMR but many more coins offer moderate privacy and would be easy to beat. (42 points, 31 comments)
    10. If Memo taught me one thing it's the more uses around the coin the better - can BCH be adopted to help fight counterfeiting? (33 points, 4 comments)
  15. 1055 points, 5 submissions: ForkiusMaximus
    1. MortuusBestia hits on a pitch-perfect way of looking at BCH's value proposition in epic comment on /BitcoinMarkets (604 points, 109 comments)
    2. I am excited that BCH is being irrationally criticized, because it reminds me of 2011 and 2012 when Bitcoin was being irrationally criticized. Any of 2013, when the price rose 100x. (183 points, 82 comments)
    3. Japanese tweeter makes a good point about BTC: "You don't call it an asset if it crumbles away every time you go to use it. You call it a consumable." (144 points, 21 comments)
    4. Jimmy Nguyen: Bitcoin Cash can function for higher level technical programming (80 points, 3 comments)
    5. How NOT to tell which is "the real Bitcoin" (44 points, 15 comments)
  16. 1032 points, 6 submissions: theantnest
    1. Let's start a class action lawsuit against Canada for calling their currency the dollar. I accidentally bought CAD when I wanted USD, and didn't know I could just exchange it again. (511 points, 243 comments)
    2. BTC noobs conned into being concerned about node count to distract them from the real centralization problem: (137 points, 172 comments)
    3. Any real scientist interested in Bitcoin should be happy Bitcoin Cash exists. (110 points, 40 comments)
    4. Blockstream shill admits to exaggerating and slandering Roger purely because he doesn't support BTC. (103 points, 49 comments)
    5. Cognitive Dissonance: It's totally fine to call BCH 'bcash', but it's fraudulent to call it Bitcoin? (93 points, 51 comments)
    6. Be Cash! (78 points, 45 comments)
  17. 1029 points, 7 submissions: zhell_
    1. MEMO NOW SUPPORTS REPLIES, join the Party now ! (208 points, 50 comments)
    2. memo.cash has been generating 2000 tx/day since its start, which is near 10% of all transactions on the BCH network. (201 points, 73 comments)
    3. "Money comes from being the most tradable of all commodities" Austrian Economics (189 points, 104 comments)
    4. Fiat is crashing: Inflation in the US averages at 10%/year in the past 5 years when measured as the price of the top 500 items on which Americans spend their after-tax dollars. (183 points, 49 comments)
    5. Memo.cash breaks a record with 3000 on-chain actions in the last 24h after implementing replies (143 points, 25 comments)
    6. with 2k tx/day, memo.cash is only using ~0.09% of 8MB blocks capacity currently on the BCH network (that would be 0.02% of 32MB blocks) (69 points, 3 comments)
    7. Help! I bought what I thought was Bitcoin and it is now gone! /s (36 points, 8 comments)
  18. 1020 points, 4 submissions: Anenome5
    1. Let's End the War and focus on the TRUE ENEMY (719 points, 349 comments)
    2. Satoshi's original whitepaper talks about "Reclaiming Disk Space" by pruning transactions, what's being done on this front? Core-trolls say we don't need to store forever that you bought a coffee, and that's true, and Satoshi also proposed how to fix that long ago. (200 points, 166 comments)
    3. Core'er says $50 fees "a wtf moment for everyone" but doubts it will ever happen again. Seems they're in for a surprise, BTC is still extremely vulnerable to transaction-fee price-inflation due to low capacity. BTC transaction fees currently 19+ times higher than BCH. (65 points, 30 comments)
    4. Bitcoin Cash, the early years... [OC] (36 points, 16 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. jessquit (3904 points, 368 comments)
  2. Kain_niaK (3058 points, 684 comments)
  3. bambarasta (2674 points, 360 comments)
  4. H0dl (2352 points, 464 comments)
  5. rdar1999 (2352 points, 404 comments)
  6. BitttBurger (2301 points, 313 comments)
  7. Adrian-X (2118 points, 506 comments)
  8. MemoryDealers (2084 points, 102 comments)
  9. trolldetectr (2073 points, 502 comments)
  10. LexGrom (2055 points, 709 comments)
  11. Ant-n (1834 points, 334 comments)
  12. LovelyDay (1820 points, 468 comments)
  13. jimbtc (1734 points, 212 comments)
  14. fruitsofknowledge (1618 points, 469 comments)
  15. ForkiusMaximus (1612 points, 211 comments)
  16. unstoppable-cash (1537 points, 201 comments)
  17. unitedstatian (1485 points, 388 comments)
  18. jonald_fyookball (1481 points, 142 comments)
  19. Bitcoinopoly (1471 points, 175 comments)
  20. BeijingBitcoins (1430 points, 100 comments)
  21. KoKansei (1330 points, 84 comments)
  22. MobTwo (1309 points, 93 comments)
  23. btcnewsupdates (1263 points, 153 comments)
  24. lubokkanev (1252 points, 298 comments)
  25. BitcoinXio (1251 points, 76 comments)
  26. taipalag (1248 points, 250 comments)
  27. mrtest001 (1075 points, 271 comments)
  28. LuxuriousThrowAway (1072 points, 163 comments)
  29. MarchewkaCzerwona (1046 points, 119 comments)
  30. cbeaks (985 points, 175 comments)
  31. SharkLaserrrrr (976 points, 135 comments)
  32. tippr (974 points, 523 comments)
  33. knight222 (963 points, 132 comments)
  34. PsyRev_ (941 points, 189 comments)
  35. radmege (919 points, 62 comments)
  36. Anenome5 (914 points, 182 comments)
  37. Churn (886 points, 75 comments)
  38. 324JL (855 points, 200 comments)
  39. emergent_reasons (854 points, 143 comments)
  40. TiagoTiagoT (841 points, 320 comments)
  41. bahkins313 (831 points, 121 comments)
  42. silverjustice (825 points, 62 comments)
  43. cryptorebel (812 points, 148 comments)
  44. scotty321 (811 points, 121 comments)
  45. DaSpawn (808 points, 113 comments)
  46. homopit (795 points, 100 comments)
  47. AcerbLogic (786 points, 205 comments)
  48. normal_rc (777 points, 59 comments)
  49. fiah84 (774 points, 136 comments)
  50. Deadbeat1000 (753 points, 61 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. No spend by ocist1121 (1189 points, 87 comments)
  2. 1 For whoever questions the utility of Bitcoin, here's banking summarized accurately by rlibec (783 points, 163 comments)
  3. Let's End the War and focus on the TRUE ENEMY by Anenome5 (719 points, 349 comments)
  4. Am I the only one that doesn't mind Bitcoin Cash being called "Bitcoin Cash" instead of just "Bitcoin" (for now)? by d3on (672 points, 401 comments)
  5. Warren Buffet's Berkshire is the single largest stockholder in BoA and WellsFargo. In case you were wondering about his attitude towards Bitcoin. by hunk_quark (614 points, 114 comments)
  6. MortuusBestia hits on a pitch-perfect way of looking at BCH's value proposition in epic comment on /BitcoinMarkets by ForkiusMaximus (604 points, 109 comments)
  7. coincall.io labels BCH a "shitcoin" by groovymash (586 points, 329 comments)
  8. Erik Voorhees: “Roger - please stop referencing me to back up your opinion that Bitcoin Cash is Bitcoin. It isn't. Bitcoin is the chain originating from the genesis block with the highest accumulated proof of work. The Bitcoin Cash fork failed to gain majority, thus it is not Bitcoin.” by sumsaph (585 points, 547 comments)
  9. Can’t believe this was available. My new license plate.. by VanquishAudio (581 points, 113 comments)
  10. Bitcoin Cash is upgrading on May 15 to 32MB max block limit by BitcoinXio (575 points, 335 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 322 points: rdar1999's comment in My dog ate my TREZOR. Check your recovery seeds folks!
  2. 314 points: my_next_account's comment in Erik Voorhees: “Roger - please stop referencing me to back up your opinion that Bitcoin Cash is Bitcoin. It isn't. Bitcoin is the chain originating from the genesis block with the highest accumulated proof of work. The Bitcoin Cash fork failed to gain majority, thus it is not Bitcoin.”
  3. 259 points: everyother's comment in 1 For whoever questions the utility of Bitcoin, here's banking summarized accurately
  4. 225 points: morli's comment in Can’t believe this was available. My new license plate..
  5. 209 points: groovymash's comment in coincall.io labels BCH a "shitcoin"
  6. 206 points: insanityzwolf's comment in Am I the only one that doesn't mind Bitcoin Cash being called "Bitcoin Cash" instead of just "Bitcoin" (for now)?
  7. 183 points: BitttBurger's comment in MoneyTrigz fails to raise more than $3,700 for Bitcoin.com lawsuit. Considers pulling the plug.
  8. 182 points: patrick99e99's comment in I used to think BCH was the bad guy, now I'm beginning to change the way I see it... Convince me that BCH is the real Bitcoin
  9. 175 points: RollieMe's comment in Trying to see both sides of the scaling debate
  10. 156 points: KillerDr3w's comment in My dog ate my TREZOR. Check your recovery seeds folks!
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
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BITCOIN par le Sushi belge ! Suite et surtout, fin The Dysfunctional Nature of BitCoin New Text Messages Reveal FBI Agent Was Friends With FISA Judge Stocker vos bitcoin, ethereum et autre crypto avec Exodus FBI [WRAY] In SENATE REVEAL SHOCKING THREATS TO USA CLASSIFIED NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN [M]ops

FBI Director Wray took the lead in answering the question, saying that cryptocurrencies already present a problem for the agency. He stated: He stated: “For us, cryptocurrency is already a significant issue and we can project out pretty easily that it’s going to become a bigger and bigger one. With the rising price and popularity of bitcoin come numerous scams. Bitcoin Superstar and Bitcoin Era are two investment schemes that have recently gained much attention. News.Bitcoin.com took a ... FBI Used Bitcoin Trail to Catch Russian Rapper Accused of Money Laundering. By CryptoNews Apr 03, 2020. 1 Views The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) used bitcoin wallet activity and an old exchange account as key evidence to arrest … Coinbase. AT&T Files for Dismissal in $24M Phone Hack Case, Claims Crypto Exec Didn’t Read Terms . By CryptoNews Apr 02, 2020. 1 Views U.S. mobile ... Subculture Status Confirmed Type: Company Year 2009 Origin Bitcoin Foundation Tags money, currency, coin, cryptocurrency, satoshi nakamoto, blockchain, digital currency, fiat currency, economy, wei dai, cypherpunks, nick colas Additional References Encyclopedia Dramatica Facebook Meme Generator Reddit Twitter Urban Dictionary Wikipedia About. Bitcoin is a virtual cryptocurrency regulated by a ... Le FBI. Le FBI est l'un des plus grands détenteurs de Bitcoin. En septembre 2013, ils ont mis à terre le site internet Silk Road, une place de marché qui hébergeait des activités illégales sur le Dark Web. Ils ont alors saisi 144.000 BTC appartenant au propriétaire du site : Ross Ulbricht. Si on additionne toutes les saisies effectuées par le FBI, cela place cette entité étatique au ...

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BITCOIN par le Sushi belge ! Suite et surtout, fin

Bitcoin Mongolia Videos; Playlists; Community; Channels; About ; Home Trending History Get YouTube Premium Get YouTube TV Best of YouTube Music Sports Gaming Movies & Shows News Live Fashion ... Sources: Who Owns the World's Biggest Bitcoin Wallet? The FBI, Wired http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/12/fbi_wallet/?cid=15955134 BitCOin Suicide Pr... The messages, which were part of the texts given to Congress by the Department of Justice, show how Peter Strzok and his partner FBI attorney Lisa Page discussed Strzok’s relationship with U.S ... Le Crypto Trade De La Semaine - La Bulle du Bitcoin éclate - USD / BTC mes formations gratuites : Réaliser des trades de 50 pips en Scalpant le forex et les ... Wheedl is a new bitcoin-powered social network that that uses “wemes”, an easy-to-use user-generated content format for communicating thoughts more effectively than in traditional message posts.

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