Mining Litecoin on the Radeon 7970: The quest for 700kh/s ...

Stock Hashrate for Multiple GPU's

Hello Reddit
I'm hoping some people here could post me their Stock Hashrate's and Power Consumption for the cards listed below. I have looked around multiple forums and found multiple answers so I'm trying to collaborate up-to-date information that others will also find useful! From this information, I can work out the Hash per Watt to find the most efficient card for you all.
Please post with (if possible):  
Card > Manufacture and Model (with Ram) > Ethereum Hashrate (Mh/s) > Power Usage > Other Info
 
Card Manufacture and Model Ethereum Hashrate (Mh/s) Power Consumption (Watts) Other Information Hashrate per Watt
GTX 960 EVGA GTX 960 FTW 10.5 75 Ubuntu 0.14
GTX 970 EVGA GTX 970 SC 19 150 Overclocked 0.126666667
GTX 970 EVGA GTX 970 FTW 20 160 Overclocked 0.125
GTX 1050 Ti
GTX 1060 Asus ROG Strix 1060 19.5 65 0.3
GTX 1070s Nvidia GTX 1070 Laptop Card 25.7 180 Laptop Card 0.142777778
GTX 1070 EVGA GTX 1070 FE 8GB 25.9 125 0.2072
GTX 1070 EVGA GTX 1070 SC 26 123 0.211382114
GTX 1070 EVGA FTW 8GB 25 140 0.178571429
GTX 1070 Palit GTX 1070 FE 8GB 26 105 65°C (OC +800 MHz Mem, +0MHz Core, Power 70% = 31.5Mh/s) 0.247619048
GTX 1070 Asus ROG STRIX 1070 25.1 Ubuntu
GTX 1080 MSI GTX 1080 ARMOR 8G OC 20.1
GTX 1080 TI EVGA FTW3 1080 Ti 31
GTX 1080 TI PNY 1080 Ti XLR8 31 225 0.137777778
GTX 1080 TI EVGA Founders 1080Ti 36 250 0.144
GTX 1080 TI GeForce Founders 34 200 0.17
HD 7970 MSI Radeon HD 7970 3GB 12.5
R9 280X Sapphire Dual X 12
R9 290 Sapphire R9 290 26.6
R9 290X MSI 290x Gaming 29 200 0.145
R9 390 MSI Gaming 8GB 31 250 0.124
R9 390X Sapphire Tri X - 390X 1055/1500 Memory 8GB 31.4 250 0.1256
R9 390X Sapphire R9 390X 8GB Nitro 30
R9 M390X R9 M390X 18 Laptop
RX 460
RX 470 MSI Radeon RX 480 4GB 24.5
RX 470 Sapphire Radeon RX470 Nitro OC 4GB 22
RX 470 Asus ROG Strix RX 470 20
RX 480 XFX Radeon RX 480 4GB 20.5
RX 480 MSI 480X Gaming X 8G 24.8
RX 480 Arctic Mono Cooler Mod 23 140 0.164285714
RX 480 RX 480 8gb Gigabyte G1 gaming w/ Samsung Memory 27 105 0.257142857
RX 480 MSI RX 480 Gaming X 8G 24.8
RX 560
RX 570 Asus ROG Strix 570 OC 4GB 24 93 0.258064516
RX 570 Sapphire Pulse RX570 4GB OC 24
RX 570 Sapphire Radeon Nitro+ RX 570 4GB 24.5 140 0.175
RX 570 Gigabyte RX 570 consistent 26.9
RX 580 Powercolor Red Devil RX 580 8GB 24 145 0.165517241
RX 580 XFX GTS Black Core Edition RX580 22.4
RX 580 Asus RX 580 O8G 24
R9 FURYX 27
   
I will update this post as the info comes in. Thanks you to all who contribute.
If this information is useful to you, a beer (or two) would be nice!
 
Bitcoin 1MkpsTiqVgiq2TXM2yF4is4HVzCmFpcoi6
 
Ethereum 0x704826a9fff6580ed71f19dd52ce980946cd3645
 
ZCash t1Y8fLc4TGHzkKw8cQQ9CX6doEqngef1ACa
 
Up-vote if this is/was useful for you so others can see.
submitted by TheFigBird to EtherMining [link] [comments]

[Discussion] My own personal guide to used hardware alternatives.

Hi there. My name is Jeff. I've been building systems for the better part of 15 years and try my best to contribute here actively. After being involved in this little community for a few years now, I'm noticing a serious lack of discussion about buying used components, and I feel like it's time to shed a little light on the subject for those looking to build on a (seriously) tight budget.
As Linus said in his scrapyard wars video, buying new on $300 isn't practical, and if you posed the challenge to him on a random day, buying used is almost certainly the path he'd choose. As someone who's been "scrapyarding" as a hobby for the better part of 10 years, I figured I'd take some time to share some of what I've learned for the modern audience.
Let's begin with a simple rundown of modern "budget" choices, and I'll tell you what I'd do instead.
CPU
The G3258 and Athlon 860k are the sub-$100 CPUs of choice, and both work just fine. I have built with both in the past, and each carries their own set of advantages.
Used Alternatives: You can go in a couple of directions here; if you happen to have an LGA 1366 motherboard lying around, you can get an i7 920 or better for under $50, and they still hold up reasonably well. Being that LGA 1366 boards are not typically cheap when purchased used, my favourite option is the Phenom II x4 Black Edition series, each of which compare favourably to modern budget options, and will even overclock on some incredibly dated, dirt cheap AM2+ boards. In my experience, eBay prices on these get a little too high for my taste, but I've been able to nab several on Kijiji locally in Toronto for under $50 as well.
GPU
The R7 260x and GTX 750 ti are often cited as budget options for most builders, with the latter serving a very specific role in systems where power draw might be a concern. While there exists no option that can complete with the low consumption of the 750 ti (or even the single 6-pin connector goodness of the 260x), its performance can easily be matched (and exceeded) for less money.
Used Alternatives: The bitcoin mining craze from a few years back led to the Radeon 7950 and 7970 being blacklisted on the used market, and I think the fears about burned-out cards are a little overblown. Here in Toronto, you can easily grab a 7950 for the price of a 260x, but I don't pay anywhere near that for my builds. At most, a Windforce will cost me $125, as where I recently picked up some non-boost edition PowerColor versions for a mere $83 each (bought 3 for $250).
EDIT: Forgot to mention something important - avoid the reference 7950 and 7970. They were employed to a far greater degree in mining rigs because of their rear-only exhaust, and if you see a bunch of them from the same seller listed at once, they're likely old mining cards. Only pick them up if they're incredibly cheap.
Want to go even cheaper? The Radeon 6950 (with the shader unlock, preferably) or even the 6970 will rival the performance of the 260x, and shouldn't cost Canadians more than $50-$60. I personally have 2 in my possession right now, and have gone through at least a dozen in the last 6 months.
In general, one should always avoid Nvidia when buying used, because they are far too popular and overvalued for their performance as they age. I still see GTX 660s selling for $150, which is absolutely absurd.
Motherboards
Motherboards on the used market are weird, and this can largely be attributed to the fact that they're hard to transport and don't handle well over time. As such, people don't really sell boards on their own that often, and you'll likely have more luck finding a combo of some kind (or even a ready-to-go tin-can with no graphics card) for less per part than you will finding a given board on its own.
Used Alternatives: The boards I'd recommend depend entirely on the CPU you've chosen. Being that I'm a fan of the Phenom II x4 series, AM2+ boards are going to be dirt cheap, but DDR2 RAM is actually fucking expensive, so you'd likely be better off going with AM3. I've even seen some used AM3+ boards (The 970 ASRock Extreme3, in particular) for as low as $40, so it wouldn't hurt to look.
On the Intel side, you're actually at a significant disadvantage. Much like Nvidia cards, Intel boards (and CPUs) actually retain their value and don't often come cheap. For me, LGA 1156 is the price/performance sweet spot, granted I can find an i7 8XX to go with it. Even still, they're going to run you a fair bit more than an AMD board, and likely aren't worth it by comparison.
RAM
Ram is ram. DDR2 is pricy as fuck due to an obvious market shortage of the stuff, so the AM2+ board option might not be best by comparison. DDR3 ram, however, is ubiquitous, and I always die a little inside when people building on a "budget" choose to buy new at all. If I'm being honest, I can get DDR3 ram from e-waste recycling companies for as low as $10 per 4GB stick, at 1333MHz, and not once have I ever had a bad stick of the stuff. Even for people going the route of the G3258 (which only supports 1333MHz), this is the clear winner.
Is value RAM ugly as sin? Sure it is. It is just as good as that fancy Ripjaws shit you've got in your current build? You betcha.
Storage
Hard Drives are actually a tricky game, as they are the single most volatile component in any budget build, easily succumbing to wear and tear from age and daily use. As such (and some might find this hard to believe) I actively avoid HDDs when building value systems for people and opt for cheap SSDs instead. As always, check the date on a drive if you're really insistent on buying one, and considering how cheap a WD blue is new, don't pull the trigger on one unless it's for less than $30/TB.
SSDs are obviously (akin to RAM) highly resilient and are nearly guaranteed to work when purchased used. The average SSD pulled from an old laptop or an office off-lease desktop, will have no more than 100GB of writes on it, which leaves 99% of its life for you to exploit. While there exists no specific recommendation for which brand to buy, just be sure you're getting a relatively good drive with SATA III capability. 120/128GB variants of these sorts should cost you no more than $50 in my native Canada, and I've even gotten lucky on some larger sizes too. Recently I picked up 4 256GB Samsung 840 Pros for $75 each (I came), just days after I bought a Crucial MX100 of the same size for $85.
Monitors
Monitors are fun to buy, because the recent shifts in display technology have rendered a lot of recent-but-obsolete models nearly valueless. For example, remember when 16:10 was a thing? I actually still like 1680x1050 monitors, but the rest of the world seems to disagree, so I've been able to pick up 23" variants for as little as $40. Being that the slightly lower resolution actually eases the strain on your VRAM a bit, it's a nice fit for a lot of budget cards that might not have a full 2GB available, like some variants of the 6950. 1600x900 monitors are often just as cheap and come with the same inherent benefit of being obsolete despite being almost as good as its bigger 1080p cousin.
Keyboards and Mice
If you're on a budget, we can't even have this discussion. As much as I like mechanical keyboards and high-precision gaming mice, people building used $300 systems aren't going to allot any of their budget buying them. That said, wired USB keyboards and mice are virtually free (search your local goodwill or value village for some), and if you have to pay money, buy a wireless combo for $20 new from some little shit store in a suburb somewhere.
Cases
Cases on their own sell for about half of their original retail price, give or take based on the condition. I normally just get them as a part of a tin-can bundle and make use of them if they aren't too dirty, but when building for someone else, I'd often just prefer to buy a new budget case in the $40 range.
PSUs
I saved this topic for last, because it's by far the most difficult category to master. First off, you really need to do your research and understand how PSUs work before delving into these guys, as the cost associated is almost entirely dependent on how resilient the underlying platform has been proven to be. Generally speaking, reading reviews on JonnyGuru and HardOCP is a great start, but none of them account for units that are several years old.
As a general rule of thumb, I use the EVGA 500W W1 as a reference point, and build my value tree around that. In other words, if a new EVGA 500W (a passable, proven budget unit) is cheaper than a used 500W variant of a better brand, why would I bother buying used? Sure, that 520W Seasonic S12II puts the EVGA to shame in terms of voltage regulation and ripple suppression, but can I really make the same claims of a unit that's 5 years into its life? Wouldn't I just be safer buying new? These are all factors you have to consider.
For me, the threshold lies around 50% in terms of cost savings vs. risk. In other words, if you can find a used quality unit for less than half the price of the cheapest quality unit available at a given time, buy it.
Anyhow I think that covers everything. And as a closing note, remember to be safe. Meet potential sellers (and buyers) in public, well-lit places, and try your best to avoid entering someone's home without some protections in place. Also, the more info you get about the person (address, phone number, etc) the less likely it is that a person will be trying to scam you. People who purposely conceal their identity do so for a reason.
Also, feel free to ask me anything about my own experiences buying and selling used. I've been doing it as a hobby for a long, long time and have sold many value builds to people who can't otherwise afford PCs. I'm happy to impart any wisdom I might've gained over the years.
Edit: CPU Coolers! Forgot those. Air coolers are a safe bet. They're slabs of copper and aluminum with fans strapped to them. Buy with confidence, and seek one out for $10-$15 if you plan to overclock. AIO water cooling is not so safe. Those things are typically only good for 2-3 years, and you have no idea how much longer a pump has before it gives. Budget builders likely aren't water-cooling anyhow, right?
Edit 2: Just to be clear, when I said I'd been doing this for a long time, I should clarify that a) I once owned a game store and sold systems out of there and b) I currently resell systems out of my house to raise money for charity builds. I really don't want people to get the impression I'm trying to sell anything.
submitted by Oafah to buildapc [link] [comments]

Should I buy a 7950 for 225 bucks?

Ok so I have found a guy in my city selling a Powercolor 7950 for 225. He says he used it for bitcoin mining and stopped and hes selling it because he just cashed out and he is moving. Here are my concerns:
  1. Its been used for mining, and while I know bitcoin is not mem intensive, its still mining (seller claims around 6 months of mining).
  2. Its a reference powercolor with another cooler installed and new thermal paste, (guy claims 68c temps consistently) and I do not know the specific model.
  3. I have a 650w PSU its a rosewill capstone (~91% efficiency at 50-80% load) 80+ gold, its about 11 months old. The reason I say this is that my irg already has a 7970 inside and i'm drawing about 290 watts from the wall total (7970 is undervolted as well as my 3770k). even if this card adds 250w overclocked, im still at only 540w pulling from the wall but realistically I will probably undervolt the card to keep temps down.
Is this a good deal and should I jump on it?
EDIT** I decided against buying based on my PSU. I have redirected the seller to hardware swap and this sub in hopes he can still sell the card, but I am not sure he will try selling here.
EDIT 2 I Found a Sapphire 7970 Vapor-X card for 300$!!! this card I know I can undervolt and I will be purchasing that instead
submitted by DrJohnFuckinZoidberg to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

Are you in the market for some computer parts? Looking to bring your rig up to Star Citizen spec? Look no further!

Our very own /KhanKarab has a surplus inventory of the following parts:
He is liquidating this inventory, and will take reasonable offers. If you have no specific offer, you can ask for a price quote. Just a word to the wise: make sure you're near a toilet, because he's pants-soilingly cheap.
Will accept Paypal and BitCoin as payment.
I personally vouch for Karab, because he is an amazing person, and has delivered goods to people I connected him with.
I will update this Subreddit (or Karab will) as his inventory gradually depletes. Be sure to send a direct message to /KhanKarab with your order or questions. He will let you know if he has the item in stock.
(Note: He has a lot. A lot.)
submitted by NKato to TestSquadron [link] [comments]

[Build Help] Choosing a graphics card upgrade

I have an original 7970 reference card, not the GHz model from PowerColor. It's time to change cards sadly. It's stock is 925/1325, however I user to be able to overclock 1125/1500 on air. I used to Bitcoin and eventually Litecoin mine with it when I wasn't using it. I started noticing some artifacting and have slowly been decreasing my overclocks; I am now at 1000/1375. I started looking at graphics cards as soon as I had to star clocking down. I decided on the 780 ti, and it was an spectacular improvement. So I put the 7970 in a dedicated rig to litecoin mine full-time until it eventually would die. However, after the Watch Dogs issues started to creep up with vRAM. I started to worry with consoles having access to potentially 6 GB of vRAM, would a day come soon that 3 GB in the 7970 and the 780 ti limit me before the actual graphics processor. I immediately returned my 780 ti while in my first 30 days and put the 7970 back in my gaming pc. After it was dedicated mining for 24 days, my overclocks are now down to 980/1325 to prevent artifacting. It really needs to be replaced. I started looking at the 295x2 and the Titan Black. obviously the 295x2 will perform better per dollar, but part of the switch from AMD to NVIDIA was a desire to buy the Shield 2 (if it comes out) for game streaming.
So, my question is, in light of Watch_Dogs need for a minimum of 3GB of vRAM just for the highest textures, and stuttering when you are around that amount and including the fact the consoles have access to a potential 6 GB of vRAM at any given time (meaning game developers may start being horribly inefficient with their vRAM sizes). Does the Titan Black seem like requirement to anyone else (if you are wanting NVIDIA)?
My Build:
GPU Choices:
EDIT: formatting
submitted by rhinodude to buildapc [link] [comments]

Fast and Compact Litecoin mining rig with AMD Radeon 7990 GPU = 1.2MH/s XFX Radeon HD7970 - Used for Bitcoin Mining Corsair 600T Water Cooled Komodo HD 7970 NCIX Tech Tips - YouTube (MybadOmen) Overview - MSI Twin Frozr III HD7970 OC/BE Overview

PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 AX7970 3GBD5-2DHV3 3GB 384-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card. Sign in or Create an Account. Search. Cart 0. Search. Home; Frequent Questions; About; Shipping Info; Warranty ; Crypto Payments; Guides; Sign in; Create an Account; Menu. Cart Home › Powercolor HD 7970 V3. Powercolor HD 7970 V3. Earn Bitcoin with GPUs. Quantity . Add ... PowerColor AX7970 3GBD5-M2DHG Radeon HD 7970 3GB 384-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card gpuShack Notes Standard HD 7970 reference design. While the reference design runs loud and hot, it features excellent stability, optimal airflow design, and a long lasting blower fan. Powercolor: Wassergekühlte Radeon HD 7970 mit 1,15 GHz. Die Powercolor LCS HD7970 soll als eine der ersten Grafikkarten auf Basis der Tahiti-GPUs mit Wasser gekühlt werden. Der Hersteller hat ... EDIT: I meant 7950. Thanks for the advice earlier re: F43 Bios - Lucky I asked or I'd have flashed my cards with it tomorrow. Next question... Buy PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 DirectX 11 AX7970 3GBD5-M2DHG 3GB 384-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with fast shipping and top-rated customer service.Once you know, you Newegg!

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Fast and Compact Litecoin mining rig with AMD Radeon 7990 GPU = 1.2MH/s

Powercolor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card Unboxing & First Look Linus Tech ... Noob's Guide To Bitcoin Mining - Super Easy & Simple - Duration: 11:37. UFD Tech 2,246,923 views. 11:37. LIVE ... Selling this card. Used it for BTC Mining before the difficulty got too hard. Now I've just been using it for gaming until I just recently upgraded to a XFX R9 290, so I don't need this guy ... You will see how easy it is to make your own Litecoin mining rig with a single 7990 GPU. You can easily get greater than 1.2MH/s performance with a Powercolor 7990 GPU. LTC donations welcome ... This is my new water cooled setup for my Intel i7 960 with AMD MSI 7970 and Corsair Dominator GT RAM. The RAM block is a Bitspower Galaxy Freezer Memory Block X6. The CPU block is a EK Supreme HF ... Just got back from camp and my new MSI Twin Frozr III 7970 OC/BE GPU was sitting here waiting for me so i whipped out the cam nvidia shirt and all and gave you guys a quick glance and explained ...

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